Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Agatha Christie Mystery Potatoes #recipe + book giveaway for AS GOUDA AS DEAD


By now, you all know I'm gearing up for the release of the next Cheese Shop Mystery #6: As Gouda As Dead. So yes, another giveaway!  If you leave a comment TODAY, as in weeks past, you'll be entered to win a Cheese Shop Mystery plus some fun swag. See details below!



* * *

My son and DIL gave me a cookbook from England called The Curious Cookbook: Viper Soup, Badger Ham, Stewed Sparrows and 100 More Historic Recipes by Peter Ross. Long title! Whew! Some fun reading inside.


Now, I can't make most of the items. Some require pheasant from the 1400s and vipers. I hate vipers!  I think it's truly meant to be a history book. But, lo and behold, I found a recipe tucked away at the end of the book that I could make.  It's simple; it's tasty. It's called

Agatha Christie’s Mystery Potatoes

I couldn't pass that up!

Here's the recipe directly from the book:
  
“6 good-sized potatoes, a little margarine, 4 tablespoonsful cream, 10 anchovies. Bake the potatoes in a moderate oven. Then cut them in half, remove the insides, and mash them with the margarine and cream. Chop up the anchovies and mix them in. Add pepper and salt to taste. Return mixture to the empty skins, dap on top with margarine and brown in a hot oven.”

I have to admit I tweaked the recipe.  I mean, c'mon, it's a potato, with anchovies. Admittedly, the anchovies are a wonderful touch! Tasty, salty yum!

When you add cheese (how could I not?)...heaven.

I also tweaked by using butter, not margarine!  Sorry, Dame Agatha!  And about a half tablespoon per…

For the moderate oven, I set it at 325 degrees for 1 hour. I wrapped the potatoes in foil. I always find that cooks them through. I used a Barber's Cheddar cheese to top off the potatoes. A truly wonderful addition!  


MY AGATHA CHRISTIE POTATO RECIPE:

6 potatoes
3 tablespoons butter
4-6 tablespoons cream
1 jar (container) anchovies, chopped
1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese

Wrap potatoes individually in foil. Bake potatoes in a preheated oven, at 325 F for 1 hour.  Remove and cut a slit down the middle. Press from the sides to open. Let out steam. Carefully scoop potato flesh out of the skin and put in a bowl with the butter, cream and anchovies. Stir and scoop it back into the potato skins, pushing together so the potato mounds out the top. Sprinkle with Cheddar cheese and serve.

Note: hold the skins together when scooping so they don’t fall apart!











GIVEAWAY

I'm giving away another CHEESE SHOP MYSTERY today, plus some swag.  Tell me what is the most exotic recipe you've ever tried or have the hankering to try. 

Leave your email so I can reach you if you win. If you don't feel like leaving an entire email, you can go cryptic and I'll try to figure it out. I am a mystery writer, after all. I will not use your email for any other purpose other than to contact the winner. I'll pick a name tomorrow morning. The winner will have 48 hours to contact me.

Good luck!

Savor the mystery!

******************

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NEXT BOOK OUT: AS GOUDA AS DEAD, coming February, 2015
pre-order here





STIRRING THE PLOT is available for order: order here.


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so you can learn about upcoming events, releases, and contests! 



93 comments:

  1. love your books and the baked potato looks yummy

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  2. I enjoy reading your Cheese Shop Mystery series. Thank you for the recipe and the giveaway.
    myrifraf(at)gmail(dot)com

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  3. The most exotic I have tried would be homemade noodles and they did not come out at all. The dough was to sticky to work with and all I did was make a huge mess lol thanks for the chance to win. I enjoy reading your books I am safer reading than cooking!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember when pasta machines first came out and I bought one. What a mess. I'm sure the pros know how to use them, but mine, too, were sticky. Ugh! LOL

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  4. As far as exotic foods, not much. I'm a food wussie. I tried sushi, it was OK, but not my fav.

    kaye.killgore@comcast.net

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  5. Not very good with the cooking or exotic. I would rather read recipes. Congrats on the new release.

    gibsonbk at hiwaay dot net

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    Replies
    1. Aha, a recipe reader. I know many of those! Enjoy.

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  6. The most exotic recipe I ever tried was homemade challah. I actually succeeded at braiding the bread loaf - it was tricky though :) EMS591@aol.com

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    Replies
    1. I would imagine it was. Challah is so pretty! I braided a cinnamon loaf once. :)
      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  7. I don't cook much at all and definitely have not tried making anything exotic :)
    jslbrown2009(at)aol(dot)com

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    Replies
    1. Sometimes, simply cooking can be the challenge, right? :)

      Daryl / Avery

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  8. German chocolate cake
    Dutchcyclone@gmail.com

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  9. I'm not very daring in the kitchen, but I have tried to make lettuce wraps, the filling was too runny, tearing the lettuce. Guess that's not really exotic, but lack of experience! Thanks!
    JHolden955(at)gmail(dot)com

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    Replies
    1. I think that's pretty exotic! I adore lettuce wraps, especially the ones at PF Changs. Gluten free and delicious!

      Daryl / Avery

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  10. Eggplant Parmesan is as exotic as I get. We love cheese so anything made with it is fantastic. Pp92596 at outlook dot com

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  11. Although I'll certainly try exotic foods.... I don't usually cook them. :) Although I am experimenting with Thai foods....
    afarage(at)earthlink.net

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    Replies
    1. Thai anything is exotic. All the nuts and spices!

      Daryl / Avery

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  12. A treasure of a recipe hidden in plain sight!
    I like your tweaks.
    Really? That much anchovy works?
    As to cooking, I'll try to make almost anything that catches my fancy--bread, souffles, whatever.
    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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    Replies
    1. Libby, yes, that much anchovy. It's a pungent flavor! You can always add more. My husband likes extra anchovies on a Caesar salad.

      Daryl / Avery

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    2. Here was thinking that was a lot of anchovy and you tell me I can use more if I want to!
      There was/is a coffee house in the Village (as in NYC) where I had a grilled cheese sandwich with mozzarella and anchovies. The fish with the creamy but mild cheese worked very well.

      Delete
  13. I don't think i'd want to try badger ham.
    sgiden at verizon(.)net

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    Replies
    1. Me, either. The thought...ugh. But way back when, and if it was all that was available... Ah, the good old days. Old, old, old days.

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  14. When I was young and foolish and cooked to please guys, I used to make a Beef Bourguignon. Now, lucky me, my son cooks for me. Hos wife loves cheese so we have a lot of it.
    lkish77123 at gmail dot com


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I still cook to please guys (my husband), but also myself. Love Beef Bourguignon. Shared that a few months ago on this site. :)

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  15. The most exotic food I ever tried to make was Ratatouille Niçoise. It started out fine but hubby was late from work and after sitting there it turned to mush. Never tried it again.
    b5sycop@nefcom.net

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nothing worse that letting something good go cold. No fun!

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  16. A fish dish that was a hit. Exotic is rare but interesting. Thanks for this great feature. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are some fabulously exotic fish dishes out there. Good for you.

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  17. I prefer to be safe and use my traditional recipes. I did once try a unique chicken recipe which was ok. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Okay means you didn't make it again. Great is worth doing twice. In fact, I just learned how to make a gluten-free yule log that was GREAT!!! So I'll share that recipe with you all next Xmas. :)

      Daryl / Avery

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  18. I usually don't try any recipes that I consider exotic because the hubby won't even try them---about the most exotic thing he will eat is chow mein and then it has to be American-style.
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com

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    Replies
    1. Ah, Sue, no fun to be with a party pooper when it comes to experimenting. But chow mien is delish. I don't think I'd know the difference between American and Chinese, having never been to China. :)

      Daryl / Avery

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  19. Thank you for the recipe and the wonderful giveaway! I love your books :) I think the most exotic thing I ever tried was calamari and I really liked it. The other thing was maybe the venison steak tips but I don't know that it really counts as exotic since my friend's son killed the deer himself lol ford0368@comcast.net

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    1. April, I think venison is quite exotic. My sister is a hunter. I haven't taken to venison, but she loves it as does my husband and son.

      Daryl / Avery

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    2. ...as "do" my husband and son. Awkk! Personal editor. :)

      Delete
  20. I'm a pretty basic cook so I can't think of any exotic recipe I have tried. I love cheese and potatoes so I'm sure I would love this recipe---I'd omit the anchovies. Your book sounds great and thank you for the contest!
    woodrumbetty@gmail.com

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  21. My hubby and I like to try new things. This new year I have been trying 3 or 4 new recipes each week. Even my 11 year old is pretty good about trying stuff. We have a deal, he has to try one bite before he can't like anything, lol. I want to try making seafood stew and curry, but sometimes my recipe book and budget don't always agree. =) Thanks for the chance to win! mamamoongrrlie at gmail.com

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    Replies
    1. Good for you to take so many challenges! Love it. And yes, I was that way with my son. At least one bite and then if you don't like it, at least you tried. :)

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  22. Pat (patdupuy@yahoo.com)January 28, 2015 at 12:28 PM

    Not too exotic, but after we visited Spain I tried to make a tortilla from a Spanish cookbook. That is a dish with eggs and potatoes, mainly. It was very labor intensive. There has got to be an easier recipe! I did make a Scottish crannoch dessert recently. Much easier and yummy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tortillas, eggs and potatoes? Sounds yummy! And the dessert, too!

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  23. Interesting! Thanks for the giveaway!

    littleone AT shaw Dot ca

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  24. The most exotic was brining and cooking beef tongue. It actually came out very well.

    little lamb lst at yahoo dot com

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  25. That sounds so yummy. I have got to try it. Oh and the recipe as well.

    ReplyDelete
  26. I've always wanted to try lobster. It's so expensive that I won't order it at a restaurant and it's not something I would make at home. Love cheese of all kinds.
    txmlhl@yahoo.com

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    Replies
    1. Interestingly enough, lobster isn't that hard to make at home and if you get the frozen tail, it's fairly reasonable (once in a while).

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
    2. Mary, you are the winner by random number selection. Congrats!!! I'll contact you and you'll have 48 hours to respond. Say cheese!

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  27. Oops, forgot my email
    Theresjustlife@gmail (at) gmail (dot) com

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  28. I like crisp skins so don't wrap my potatoes. grammyd01@comcast.net

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    Replies
    1. Aha, yes, crispy is better when not wrapped. I love stuffed potato skins as appetizers.

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  29. Don't do exotic food. I am simple girl.

    xzjh04@ Gmail.com

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  30. I am kinda picky when it comes to eating so don't really go for exotic dishes jody.714@hotmail.com

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  31. My husband is a avid outdoorsman. The second Christmas that we were married, he wanted a "traditional " holiday dinner. So he wanted me to cook goose instead of turkey. Finding a goose was almost as much excitement as the cooking. It was good but needles to say we have had turkey for the last 35 Christmases.
    Benglish@whro.net

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    Replies
    1. Goose is difficult to get right. I'm not sure I'd try it, but I think Krista has had plenty of success with it!

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  32. Cooking pheasant is the most exotic thing that I have cooked. It took quite a bit of time to prepare it for cooking. My dad shot and cleaned the pheasants. But then you have to soak the pheasant in salt water (changing it several times) until the water is clear. Then you can cook the pheasant.
    annabanana.heck@yahoo.com

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    Replies
    1. Fascinating. Another brining technique. Thanks for sharing.
      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  33. I am not very adventurous than it comes to food. I did make spring rolls once. angelhwk68@yahoo.com

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    Replies
    1. That's pretty darned adventuresome!! I'm impressed.

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  34. The most exotic I have tried is sweet and sour chicken. My husband liked it but he is more an Italian cooking kind of guy. Nothing to strange or exotic!
    cece56@nycap.rr.com

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    1. Cece, I find many men are that way. But Italian is yummy! Why switch? :)

      Daryl / Avery

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  35. I am normally a pretty simple cook. But I did make a risotto with scallops. It was yummy.

    kpowers784@yahoo.com

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    Replies
    1. One of my favorite comfort foods is risotto! Yum.

      Daryl / Avery

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  36. Every year for Boxing Day I make something British for dinner: bangers and mash, shepherds pie, roast beef with Yorkshire pudding and bubble and squeak. (Nigella Lawson's "Feast" so helpful) Does British fare count as exotic?
    traceyr1984@msn.com

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    1. What fun!!! Yes, British counts as exotic. I make roast beef and Yorkshire pudding every Christmas (and usually one more time during the year). I'm so impressed with the rest. :)

      Daryl / Avery

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  37. I should say "or" bubble and squeak. Only one meal per year!

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  38. These sound pretty good. I think a few minutes in the oven to melt the cheese would be a nice touch as well to make it a twist on the "twice-baked" potato.
    blueeyedbat72@gmail.com

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    Replies
    1. Amy, you're probably right. The cheese melted right in, but it might be pretty. :)

      Daryl / Avery

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  39. You had me ready to try this recipe-until I read anchovies. No thanks! lol I'll get my saltiness from something other than fish...salt pork, perhaps?

    I don't know about an exotic recipe-I do use a lot of Indian spices-love me some Vindaloo-I know I would love to try turducken, but I never intend to try to cook it! lol

    cozyupwithkathy @ gmail dot com

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    1. Ha! I know. So many people don't like anchovies. So make them without. It was Dame Agatha who suggested them. (I refuse to take the blame LOL) Vindaloo is exotic.

      Daryl / Avery

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  40. My husband loved anchovies on pizza, but I wouldn't have thought to put them in baked potatoes. I'd try it, because I have never met a potato I didn't like. Thanks for the idea and recipe.

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    Replies
    1. Aha, yes, anchovies on pizza. I forgot about those!

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  41. I don't do exotic since no one I know will eat it. Chicken Parm is as out there as I get.
    dotkel50 at comcast dot net

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    Replies
    1. Chicken Parm is WAY out there! Ha-ha. Not. But delish!

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  42. That looks like a very interesting cookbook to read. I think I would like the potatoes, but haven't had anchovies much. Exotic? Hmmm. Does lefse count?

    ElaineE246 (at) msn (dot) com

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    Replies
    1. Okay, not at all sure what "lefse" is....

      Daryl / Avery

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    2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lefse
      I grew up with my grandma Rose and my mom and my aunts getting together to make lefse. Only butter was spread on it and rolled up in it. But a lot of the family now put sugar on the butter. I still prefer just the butter. We had a lefse-making party before Christmas so we could enjoy it at family gatherings.

      Delete
  43. loving this recipe!!!
    thank you for the giveaway!!

    cyn209 at juno dot com

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  44. Spaghetti sauce with cinnamon. mmamacitagrita@gmail.com

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  45. I love those old recipes that are so wonderfully vague and assume you already know how to cook. Your cookbook reminded me a little of the Road Kill Cookbook my brother-in-law gave me. Haven't tried any of those yet. I had an old cookbook from the 1920's - Delineator Recipes - that I passed on to my daughter. Just learned that The Delineator was an American women's magazine of that period.
    sallycootie@gmail.com

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    Replies
    1. Road Kill cookbook? Hysterical!!! And Delineator doesn't sound real cozy, does it? LOL Thanks for sharing.

      Daryl / Avery

      Delete
  46. Maybe I'm too late for the contest? I hope not.

    I used to have a subscription to Redbook magazine. In one of the issues of late 1971, there was a wonderful feature called, "Great, Good, Old-Fashioned Desserts."

    That article contained a recipe for a homemade pear strudel with homemade pear sauce, or some such. Kind of a dumb name for a recipe, I admit.

    But, WOW!

    It was just unbelievably awesome. Totally fresh, real ingredients.I

    (I could never get used to "ingredients" that are prepackaged.)

    I couldn't believe how wondrously delicious it was. My hubby didn't even get any. I just had to eat it all by myself.

    That issue of Redbook also had some very nice fiction. I'll never forget that one issue, for some reason.

    ReplyDelete