Sunday, May 12, 2019

Happy Mother's Day - Welcome our guest author Lea Wait + book #giveaway


Please welcome our guest author.  Maine author Lea Wait writes the Mainely Needlepoint, Shadows Antique Print, and Maine Murder mystery series, the last under the name Cornelia Kidd. She has also written the historical mystery JUSTICE AND MERCY for adults, and both historical novels and mysteries for young people. To find out more about Lea and her books, see her website, www.leawait.com

Check out her giveaway below.

Take it away, Lea! 
 *
 
CELEBRATING MOTHERS

I’m Lea Wait, an author and, yes, a mother. To be more specific, I’m the adoptive mother of four girls (now women) who came home when they were ages 5-10, from different countries (Korea, Thailand, Hong Kong and India.)
Mothers and Fathers days were always challenges at my house. To begin with, I adopted my daughters when I was single, so there was no father in the picture. 

The first year one of my daughters came home with a Father’s Day card she’d made in school she asked, “What do fathers do, Mom?” I thought hard and fast before coming up with, “They help Moms.” She nodded and handed me the card.

On Mother’s Day, dads are usually the ones who help children come up with gifts or cards, or take Mom out to dinner. In my house: no dad. So I did my best. On Mother’s Day I gave each of my daughters a small gift and thanked them for making me a mother. It worked pretty well. 

The other challenge on Mother’s Day was that at the church we attended people sponsored roses for the Mother’s Day altar. Red roses for a living mother; white roses if your mother had died. My daughters all had two mothers. (Two of them remembered their birthmothers.) We didn’t know if their birthmothers were alive or dead. So, optimistically (and to avoid tears) I put four red roses on the altar, one for each of their birthmothers. One year the minister put a red rose there in my honor. That year I cried.

As the girls grew up, we had other special ways of celebrating. One of them was inviting two other adoptive moms and their children to join us for dinner and dessert. And, as teenagers, the girls all loved the times we served cheese fondue for dinner, and chocolate fondue for dessert. 

In my most recent book, THREAD ON ARRIVAL, my protagonist, Angie Curtis, is treated to a special lunch on her birthday by the man in her life. And, yes, there is a teenaged boy in the story who has lost his parents and is being questioned in connection with a murder investigation.
He doesn’t join Angie and Patrick for fondue, but perhaps you might like to. (The recipe is also in the book.)


        CHEESE FONDUE

Ingredients:
2 baguettes or Italian or French bread
1 Tablespoon cornstarch
3-4 Tablespoons kirsch (Swiss cherry brandy)
1 clove peeled fresh garlic
1 plus ½ cup dry white wine
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
½ pound freshly shredded Switzerland Swiss cheese
½ pound freshly shredded Gruyere cheese
Pepper

1 fondue pot, preferably ceramic, and as many fondue forks as those dining.

Cut bread into 1 inch cubes with crust on one side. In small bowl, mix cornstarch with kirsch and stir. Put aside.

Cut garlic cloves in half and rub the inside of the clove on the inside of the cooking pan and the fondue pot.  Add wine to the pan and heat. When wine is hot but not boiling, add lemon juice. Add shredded cheese by handfuls, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon until cheeses are melted and blended. Bring fondue mixture to bubbling, briefly. Add ground pepper to taste, stirring until well-blended. Add cornstarch mixture and boil another 15-30 seconds. 

Pour mixture in fondue pot which has been warmed with a votive candle beneath it. Spear bread cubes, dunk in cheese, and swirl. Stir fondue frequently. If it starts to thicken too much, additional wine as needed and to taste.

Leftover fondue may be melted and served on toast.  This recipe will serve 2 as a main course; 4 as an appetizer; and may be doubled.

Note: Yes, there’s wine in the recipe, but heating it eliminates most of the alcohol. 

GIVEAWAY

Lea is giving away a copy of Threads on Arrival to one commenter. 
Tell her a bit about your Mother's Day tradition, 
and leave your email so she can contact you if you win.
 
Check out Lea's website.
You can follow Lea on social media here: 

Facebook
Goodreads

64 comments:

  1. When my mom was still with us, we celebrated mother's day and her birthday(the 13th) on the same day. She really looked forward to everyone coming over for a meal she prepared and receiving presents. Many years of good memories.
    browninggloria(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  2. Happy Mothers' Day! As kids we always made breakfast in bed for mom.
    turtle6422 at gmail dot com

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    1. A classic, loving, act. Your mother must have loved it!

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  3. We have a special meal together. This year I got her geraniums.

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  4. My mother got the short end of the deal as her birthday was May 10th. I am aunt to many and have earned many titles including second mother. I think you are a very brave women to adopt four children in your own. It is hard work. suefoster109@gmail.com

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    1. Yes - being a mother is hard work. But it's worth it! (Most of the time!) Being an "aunt to many" is wonderful. You don't have to BE aa mother, to love and care for a child.

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  5. We always had a special dinner for my mom. I am a mom of six daughters and we try to go to lunch. Jcook22@yahoo.com

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    1. SIX daughters! How wonderful! And lunch with all of them sounds wonderful!

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  6. This is such a lovely post Lea, for what can be a complicated day. Thank you for sharing!

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    1. Thank you, Roberta! Yes -- special days can be complicated for many families ...

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  7. Mother's Day has became complicated at our home. I can remember the typical Mother's Day growing up. Then I had a daughter of my own and it was kind of a split holiday with my Mom.

    When our daughter was 17 she died tragically in a car accident and suddenly I was a Mom with no living daughter. Oh how I dreaded the approach of the first Mother's Day. My amazingly wonderful hubby made it a beautiful day. He had bought me this gorgeous ring with sapphires and diamonds (Jenet's favorite stone and her birthstone) and first thing Mother's Day he took me out to our favorite family place with so many special memories of our daughter and told me how Jenet was still in our lives - in our hearts - and that I would ALWAYS be her Momma. He said she was smiling from heaven and wanted me to have a special present on this "first" Mother's Day and then he gave me the ring. I treasure the ring, the precious memories of Jenet and the wonderful man that God sent to me.

    Then a few years later my Mom went to her heavenly home after living with us for 5 years with Alzheimer. That Mother's Day we went on a picnic and remembered my Mom, my being able to mother and the daughter that made me a Mom. It was then that I realized that Mother's Day is also memory day whether your Mom is living or dead, you can cherish not only the present but smile at the memories of the past. So every Mother's Day is special to me and we try to do something special every day to commemorate it.

    This year we traveled almost 400 miles to spend the day with hubby's Mom who is 89 and whose health isn't the best. We will spend the day enjoying each other's company, sharing the beautiful flowers in her yard and then I will fix a nice supper as we sit and remember the times of the past and enjoy the present. Today is my present for Mother's Day - creating sweet memories to cherish in years to come.

    Thank you for the chance to win a copy of "Threads on Arrival". Most of all, cherish the day and celebrate the woman that you call Mom in your life whether with you or gone on before you.
    2clowns at arkansas dot net

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  8. My Mom took herself out of the picture when I was twelve, with four other siblings. Our tradition was to give my Dad Mother's Day cards (and gifts) . . . decades later, when he was moving into much smaller living quarters, he gave back to each of us all the cards we'd given him over the years. All of them. I cried. pjcoldren[at]tm[dot]net

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    1. I would have cried, too! You had a very special Dad. So many people forget non-traditional families at special times like this.

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  9. Wonderful story. You have a special family who understand the conflicting emotions about a day like Mother's Day. Thinking of you and your loved ones today!

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  10. We usually had presents, a nice meal, and her favorite card game. ckmbeg (at) gmail (dot) com

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  11. When my mother was alive we used to get together for the day and give gifts, prepare a special meal and enjoy the memorable day together. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Exactly the right thing to have done .. and to remember.

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  12. Your story is heartwarming and special. My mother is no longer with us and I mourn her everyday. I wish that I could spend time with her and talk about important things. I miss her terribly. Now I am a grandmother and realize so much. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. Talking is so critical .. I know there are many questions I wish I'd asked my mother … and more for my grandmother.

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  13. I have a contentious relationship with my mother, but I am blessed to have a mother-in-law who is like a mother to me. Happy Mother’s Day!

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  14. Relationships are complicated, by pasts, present, and personalities. I'm so glad you found a kindred spirit!

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  15. My mom passed away in 2018 so today is hard😫

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    1. So sorry. Peace through memories be with you.

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  16. My favorite memory on mothers day is when my mom showed me how to make her famous rolls. She has alzheimers so it hard for her.

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