Thursday, June 25, 2015

Celebration Raspberry Angel Food Cake @LucyBurdette #recipe #giveaway






LUCY BURDETTE: What do you do if two of your old standby cookbooks give different instructions for the same recipe? I wondered this when I decided to bake a celebratory angel food cake in anticipation of the July 7 release of FATAL RESERVATIONS. 


These cakes bring back good memories for me, as my mother made one to celebrate my birthday for many years. (Covered in colored whipped cream, minus the raspberries.)

This recipe is mostly taken from the Silver Palate's The New Basics cookbook, with an assist from the Joy of Cooking. When the two disagreed, I admit I went with what seemed easiest:).

 

Ingredients

11 large egg whites
1 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
1 1/4 cup sugar
1 cup cake flour
1 cup fresh raspberries

 


Separate the egg whites into a clean bowl. Add the cream of tartar and the salt, and beat on high speed until soft peaks form. Beat in the vanilla and almond extracts. 

Egg whites are like black cats, hard to get a good picture!
After sifting the sugar once, begin to beat it into the egg white mixture about 1/4 cup at a time. The egg whites should look glossy and make soft peaks when beaters are removed, without appearing stiff. 








Sift the cake flour over the top of the bowl. Then place the raspberries on top of the flour. Fold in gently without stirring or beating. Egg whites can turn out like expectations if you add too much weight--occasionally deflated! 

Spoon the mixture into a clean angel food cake pan and bake at 350 degrees for 40 minutes. Check with a toothpick to be sure the batter is done.

Rube Goldberg was here...
Cool the cake for one and a half hours. My mother used to invert these cakes onto a bottle, which seemed precarious to me. So I tried the Joy of Cooking method, inverting onto four glasses. 








Panic! Panic! The cake began to fall out of the pan, so we managed to slide a fifth glass under the pan's stem.  (I couldn't take a photo of that, because two of us were too busy trying to save it, but you can see the bulge that resulted here:).

 










In spite of all that excitement, the cake turned out light and lovely enough to stand on its own, but we served it with a dollop of mango purée and mango and raspberry sorbet. 

Because like a lot of things in life, a new book is worth celebrating! 

Let's continue our excitement with a giveaway of FATAL RESERVATIONS, which is coming to bookstores everywhere on July 7. Leave a comment describing a cooking disaster and your email, and you'll be entered in the drawing. And don't forget to preorder!

68 comments:

  1. Burnt cookies, more than once, would be my cooking disaster.
    jslbrown2009 at aol dot com

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  2. Great recipe and story, thanks! My "disaster" happened the first time my gourmand brother came to visit my fiancé and me, and I made my never-fail chocolate cake. But the mine-and-his kitchen still had some things not well labeled, and all the sugar in the recipe turned out to have been salt. The look on my brother's face after the first mouthful of the elegant-appearing cake won't ever be forgotten ... he makes sure to remind me often!!

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    1. LOL, your gourmand brother--that's the worst:). at least you got a good story out of it...

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  3. Raspberries have been so good right now--what a great summery dessert! Thankfully, I haven't had too many true kitchen disasters. However, our oven is starting to go and one side doesn't seem to heat up as well as the other. Now, I know I need to turn baked goods for better baking and rising, but not long ago, had a rather funny looking angel food cake.

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  4. Right now I can't think of any real cooking disasters but I bet if you asked my husband he could tell you about a few! The cake looks very good!

    ElaineE246 at msn dot com

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  5. When I grabbed cinnamon instead of white pepper for fresh peas and potatoes.
    doward1952@yahoo.com

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    1. Oh that must have been a shock! did you know before you tasted them?

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  6. A cake that crumbled to bits and still was edible. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. The good thing about that is you can apply a lot of whipped cream and pretend it's a trifle--that you had in mind all along!

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  7. Recipe looks great! Can't wait for this book! One time my great grandmother was coming over to my parents house for her birthday. My sister decided she wanted to make the cake. She used a boxed cake mix,the kind that you just add oil, milk, and eggs. Well she fogot to use the eggs, but only realized this after the cake was finished. So she went out got another box of cake mix, put it in the oven, and...... forgot the eggs.... AGAIN!!!!!!!! So I just decided to make the cake myself, from scratch. And Grandma never new what happened.
    Thanks for the giveaway!!!!
    magicgirl2357@yahoo.com

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  8. I remember using my Betty Crocker Boys and Girls Cookbook to make a cake. (Why do the boys get top billing, I wonder?) I only wanted one layer, so I cut the recipe in half.
    Except I didn't. I halved the dry ingredients but left the liquids the full amount.
    It was a very moist cake!

    Yours looks lovely and delicious. Especially nice with the extra fruit goodness on the side.
    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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  9. "Disaster", or not, I sure would love to have a piece of that cake! I'm out of practice baking but have had my share of dry/burnt disasters, especially cookies. patucker54 (at aol dot com)

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    1. it's too easy to make a mistake with cookies, isn't it? they go from undone to burnt in a flash!

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  10. I've had so many "disasters" in the kitchen, but my latest was having cupcakes I was making for a party (using a new recipe) completely collapse in the middle. Plan B: whip up a super scrumptious frosting and piled it high to cover up the hole! Your cake looks delicious and I'm looking forward to reading your new book! kimdavishb@gmail.com

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  11. Most of my cooking ends up with some kind of a problem. That's why my son does the cooking now. Well, that and he's a good cook (OCD and he loves cooking shows).

    Burnt cookies, underdone turkey, over dry chicken, a dropped birthday cake...is that enough?

    I used to put my angel food cakes over a soda bottle after I made them. That was when I could cook.

    lkish77123 at gmail dot com

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    1. that's what my mother did too Linda! so glad you have a good cook in the house to take the reins...

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  12. You can't really tweak recipes in bread machines to make them your own; you have to follow the recipe EXACTLY--I still can't live down my banana bread disaster (overflowed the machine, burned--incredible mess)

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  13. My first turkey - 1963 - was a frozen, stuffed one. Opened instructions and it was blank! Got hold of a deli and he said butter baist it and put into a 250 oven. When my folks arrived and we looked at it, it was still frozen. Mom took charge, we played bridge all day and ate about midnight. So much for a new bride impressing her hubby and parents.

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    1. that's a story you and your family must have enjoyed many times over:)

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  14. Angel food cake -- usually strawberry -- was always my childhood choice of birthday cake, too! Congratulations on the new book!

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  15. I made some pie crust that was so hard and tough that when I put it out for the birds, the crows picked it up and dropped it a few yards away----too awful even for them. I've never tried to make pie crust again.
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com