Sunday, November 24, 2019

Molasses Cookies with Garam Masala -- guest & #giveaway

LESLIE: One of the delights of writing the Spice Shop Mysteries has been getting to know spice purveyors -- the real-life version! I'm pretty sure Anne Milneck of Red Stick Spice in Baton Rouge found me first, but we've become online pals. Mr. Right and I have talked about spending some time together in Louisiana when Bouchercon returns to New Orleans in the fall of 2021, and you can be sure the itinerary will include time in Baton Rouge! (Red Stick -- get it? I know you did!)

If you've read Guilty as Cinnamon, my second Spice Shop mystery, you've met Garam Masala, the Indian blend Sandra uses in her spiced nuts. It's widely available, or you can make your own with my recipe in Guilty as Cinnamon. And you know my girl Pepper loves to spice up her cookies! I'm eager to try Anne's savory take on the classic molasses cookie!

Fleur de Sel is a French flake salt; if you don't have it, try Maldon Flake or a crystal salt. Ginger Sugar is a Red Stick blend; Anne says if you don't have it, you can substitute turbinado sugar, the raw, golden crystals -- you'll need about 1/4 cup for rolling. That sounds great -- you could add a little dried ginger, 1/2 teaspoon at a time, until you get a good hint of the ginger, without letting it overpower the sweetness. 

Have you used a spice in an unexpected way in a recipe? We’d love to hear your spicy story. Leave a comment below for a chance to win a gift box from Red Spice with Garam Masala, Chai Spice, and Ginger Sugar!  

Molasses Cookies with Garam Masala 

ANNE: Garam Masala is typically reserved for savory cooking. Indian recipes often call for a teaspoon or two in a big, bubbly pot of golden curry—for good reason! Garam Masala is a blend of coriander, cumin, cloves, cinnamon along with a little turmeric. We wondered what this aromatic blend would do for a spice cookie, so we added to a chewy molasses cookie and were pleasantly surprised. We took the flavor a step further by blooming the spice blend in hot, browned butter (known as liquid gold in these parts.) The result? A fantastically complex cookie that’s a must for your next dessert table.

1 stick unsalted butter
1-1/2 teaspoons Garam Masala
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
½ teaspoon Vietnamese Cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon Fleur de Sel
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup molasses
1 large egg, lightly beaten 
nonstick spray
Ginger Sugar

First, bloom the spices in the browned butter. To brown the butter, heat in a small pot over medium heat until the butter begins to brown. Stir often. Adjust the heat to prevent burning. You’re looking for an even caramel-brown color.

Once the butter is browned, turn off the heat and add in the Garam Masala—the spices will bloom in the hot butter. Move the butter to the fridge or freezer and allow to re-solidify.

Whisk together the flour, baking soda, Vietnamese Cinnamon, Garam Masala and Fleur de Sel. Using a stand mixer, cream together the bloomed browned butter and sugar until light and fluffy, scraping down the sides of the mixer occasionally. Beat in the molasses and egg. Add in the flour mixture slowly and beat on low until incorporated. Chill the dough for 2 hours.

Preaheat oven to 350 F. Form dough into 20 balls and roll in Ginger Sugar. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment and lightly spray with nonstick spray. Place 3 inches apart on baking sheets and bake for 8-10 minutes or until puffed and cracked on the top. Slide off the baking sheet with a spatula and onto a cooling rack. Allow to cool completely.






Have you used a spice in an unexpected way in a recipe? We’d love to hear your spicy story. Leave a comment below for a chance to win o gift box from Red Spice with Garam Masala, Chai Spice, and Ginger Sugar!  

(US addresses only; winner will be announced Tuesday, November 27.)  

Anne Milneck, a native of LaPlace, Louisiana, is a classically trained chef and owner of Red Stick Spice Company in Baton Rouge. She has lived and raised her family in Baton Rouge for 30 plus years. Anne returned to school at the age of 40 to earn a culinary degree from Nicholl State’s John Folse Culinary Institute. 
Red Stick Spice offers bulk spices, olive oils, balsamics, and teas, plus cooking classes. You can find Anne in the store teaching classes and guiding customers toward better home cooking. Anne also hosts the home cooking podcast Smidgen. Anne is also a certified Tea Sommelier.

Visit Red Stick Spice on their website, on Facebook, or on Instagram, @redstickspice

50 comments:

  1. I put cinnamon and nutmeg in my chocolate chip cookie bars which I don’t think most people do but it tastes really good.

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  2. Mmm, looks good! A lady I work with says she always puts a little cinnamon in her chicken noodle soup. Sounds odd but it's really good.
    kozo8989@hotmail.com

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    1. Oh, my gosh -- how wonderfully inventive! I bet everyone says "there's something different, but I can't tell what it is..."

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  3. Yum. Perfect for a Thanksgiving treat. ~ Daryl

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    1. Right? If you're going to have lots of folks mingling for a few days, a batch of these would be a big hit. Dip in a little coffee or chai...

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  4. I put cinnamon and horseradish in my vegetable soup. I make molasses cookies that are very popular. I might have to try this one also.

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    1. Now that cinnamon in soup has been mentioned twice, in chicken and vegetable, I may have to try it!

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  5. I forgot my email above suefoster109 at gmail dot com

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  6. I haven't had molasses cookies in years since my mom made them many years ago. pgenest57(at)aol(dot)com

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  7. These Molasses Cookies with Garam Masala sound fantastic! And I love the browned butter addition too. I use cayenne pepper in both my favorite double chocolate cookie recipe and my gingerbread cookie recipe. It adds just a little kick without overwhelming the other flavors.

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    1. Cayenne and chocolate are a great combo, aren't they? My gingersnaps, featured in Killing Thyme, I think, include black pepper for that little kick you mention.

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  8. Those cookies sound awesome! I would love to try your spices! Thanks for the chance! almaj80(at)suddenlink(dot)net

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  9. We love trying new spices & flavors. And I quite agree. There are a ton of things cinnamon is good in. And a lot depends on the type of cinnamon you use. So I keep the different types on hand. Same with the different types of salts and peppers. Which one you use depends of the out come of flavors. Definitely have to give this version of Molasses cookie a try. Thank you for the recipe. deepotter at centurylink dot net

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    1. Yes, yes! I'm enjoying a lovely cinnamon blend on the top of my morning latte right now!

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  10. Spice really makes a big difference and lives up the dishes. when we make home made applesauce we always put in cinnamon. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Apples and cinnamon are perfect together, aren't they?

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  11. When I was young and my grandmother lived with us for many years we would enjoy her creative meals. She was an inventive and talented cook and baker and no one could compete with her skills. Her chicken stew with bayleaf and oregano was delectable. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. Oh, bay! I could write a whole book about it! (Oh, wait -- I just did. Coming in June!)

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  12. Those look absolutely divine! It's amazing how a small amount of a spice can completely transform something. I would say my spice use is pretty typical. I love to use spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, or clove on red meat which some people find repulsive. I quite enjoy it. Thank you for the chance to win and for sharing!
    magicgirl2357@yahoo.com

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  13. Every time I make chicken (regardless of any other flavors I'm using) I add a dash of vanilla, nutmeg, and honey. It works with any other flavor and adds a unique undertone. I've done this with venison as well.

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    1. Vanilla with chicken is surprising, but I've done it and loved it, esp with a nutmeg-tinted cream sauce. The honey is a great idea1

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  14. First, is there a logic to the usual "like" and Facebook share links not being available?
    As to spices, I put unsweetened cocoa in chili for a flavor depth addition.
    We went to a friend of my mother's for dinner. She serve lasagna and proudly announced that she had a secret ingredient that we'd never guess. One bite and I said, "Clove". Yup. A heavy dose of clove. Not my idea of a good addition or subtle!
    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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    1. I think I might have had the same reaction you did!

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  15. I make oatmeal cookies with cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves. This may not be unusual, but since my mother didn't use those spices in her oatmeal cookies, I thought they were out of ordinary when I discovered the recipe years ago. After that, I never made oatmeal cookies without those spices.

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