Wednesday, September 27, 2017

French Roquefort tart #recipe + #giveaway from author @DarylWoodGerber





Giveaway below

From Daryl aka Avery:

French food. You're going to get tired of me sharing French food recipes, I'm pretty sure, but the wonderful thing about French food is the variety. When I first started writing the French Bistro Mysteries, I worried that I wouldn't be able to do it well because everything would require flour. Being a celiac, that was horrifying and scary.

But I took heart in something Eleanor Roosevelt said: "You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, ‘I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.’"

Okay, cooking isn't entirely frightening and I wasn't facing life-threatening fear, but I felt fear nonetheless.

Then I learned that cooking French food didn't require using flour all the time. And even if it did, substitutions could be made. Honestly.

I also had the misconception that everything is so rich with butter that I "shouldn't" eat it unless imbibing with a glass of cabernet to balance the cholesterol. Not true. Though I do like a glass of cabernet.

Now, there are some foods that you simply must try and savor despite the calories or cholesterol because, well, the flavor is incredible. {Can't you just see a Frenchman saying this word and then kissing his fingertips and throwing the kiss in the air?}

Here is one that I dare you not to try!


FRENCH ROQUEFORT TART
(Serves 8)

1 layer pastry dough (recipe below)
3 medium onions or 2 large onions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
2/3 cup blue-veined cheese (Roquefort, Bleu, Gorgonzola, Cambozola), crumbled
4 eggs
1 cup Half-and-Half
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Need parchment paper and dried beans, rice, or lentils.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Make and roll out the pastry. (See below) Set the pastry in a deep-dish pie pan. Line the center of the pastry with parchment paper and fill it with dried beans, rice, or lentils, and bake it for 15 minutes. Remove the pie dish from the oven and allow it to cool for 10 minutes. Remove the beans, rice, or lentils and cool them so you can use again.

Slice the onions. They will yield about 2-3 cups. In a large skillet, over low heat, melt the butter and cook the onions for 20 minutes until they're tender but not browned. Be careful not to burn them. I used tongs to stir every few minutes.

Turn up the heat to medium-high and sprinkle the sugar over the onions. Sauté the onions and sugar until the mixture turns golden brown. This takes about 15-20 minutes. Be patient and stir often. The onions will cook down to about 1 ½ cups. Remove the onions from the pan and set on a clean plate. Let cool slightly.

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, beat together the eggs, the Half-and-Half, thyme, salt, and pepper.

Layer the caramelized onions onto the pastry. Top with the crumbled blue-veined cheese. Pour the egg mixture over the onions and cheese.

Bake the tart for 35-40 minutes, until the eggs are set in the middle. Cool slightly and serve.

Neat tip: If you do not have Half-and-Half, you can make a substitute by melting one tablespoon butter and adding enough whole milk to make one cup.

PASTRY DOUGH
Gluten-Free Version
(makes 1 deep-dish pie shell)

1 ½ cup sifted gluten-free flour*
3/4 teaspoon xanthan gum
1 teaspoon salt
7 tablespoons butter or shortening
3-7 tablespoons water

Put gluten-free flour, xanthan gum, and salt into food processor fitted with a blade. Cut in 3 tablespoons of butter or shortening and pulse for 30 seconds. Cut in another 4 tablespoons of butter or shortening. Pulse again for 30 seconds. Sprinkle with 3-5 tablespoons water and pulse a third time for 30 seconds.

Remove the dough from the food processor and form into a ball using your hands. Wrap with wax paper or plastic wrap. Chill the dough for 30 minutes.

Remove the dough from the refrigerator and remove the covering. Place a large piece of parchment paper on a countertop. (If desired, sprinkle parchment paper with 2–4 tablespoons gluten-free flour.) Place the dough on top of the parchment paper. Cover with another large piece of parchment paper. This prevents the dough from sticking to the rolling pin. Roll out dough so it is ¼-inch thick and large enough to fit into a 9-inch deep-dish pie plate, with at least a ½-inch border along the edge.

Spray the deep-dish pie plate with non-stick spray or rub with butter or shortening.

Remove the top parchment paper. Place the pie plate upside down on the dough. Flip the dough and pie plate. Remove the parchment paper. Press the dough into the pie plate. Crimp the edges. Note: Why flip the dough and pie plate? Because gluten-free pastry dough, unlike regular pastry dough, doesn’t roll into a tube or fold well and has a tendency to break. This flip technique works best for me. If your dough does break, don’t worry. Use a little water and fingertips to press any breakage back together. Nobody will see the bottom of the quiche. Also, here’s a quickie tip re: gluten-free pastry. If you run a knife between the pastry and the dish before filling with mixture, it will not stick to the pie plate.

* I use a combination of sweet rice flour and tapioca starch; you can use store-bought ingredients like Bob’s Red Mill or King Arthur gluten-free flour.

PASTRY DOUGH
Regular
(makes 1 deep-dish pie shell)

1 ½ cup sifted flour
1 teaspoon salt
7 tablespoons butter or shortening
3-7 tablespoons water

Put flour and salt into food processor fitted with a blade. Cut in 3 tablespoons of butter or shortening and pulse for 30 seconds. Cut in another 4 tablespoons of butter or shortening. Pulse again for 30 seconds. Sprinkle with 3-5 tablespoons water and pulse a third time for 30 seconds.

Remove the dough from the food processor and form into a ball using your hands. Wrap with wax paper or plastic wrap. Chill the dough for 30 minutes.

Remove the dough from the refrigerator and remove the covering. Place a large piece of parchment paper on a countertop. (If desired, sprinkle parchment paper with 2–4 tablespoons flour.) Place the dough on top of the parchment paper. Cover with another large piece of parchment paper. This prevents the dough from sticking to the rolling pin. Roll out dough so it is ¼-inch thick and large enough to fit into 9-inch deep-dish pie plate, with at least a ½-inch border along the edge.

Remove the top parchment paper. Gently roll the dough into a tube, removing the bottom layer of parchment paper, and then place the tube of dough into the pie plate. Unfurl the dough. Press the dough into the pie plate. Crimp the edges.
































Ah, yes, what a wonderful time I've had researching this new mystery series. What a wonderful treat it has been for me and my family to have me step outside my comfort zone and make all sorts of foods I've never made before. I feel "younger" because of it. Truly.


GIVEAWAY

Just for listening to me wax rhapsodic, I'm offering a giveaway today of a Savor the Mystery tote bag.  Tell me your greatest "fear." Don't forget to leave your email so I can contact you in case you win!



Savor the mystery!

*
Friend Daryl and Avery on Facebook
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Plus check out my website.


A DEADLY ÉCLAIR, the 1st in the French Bistro Mysteries, is coming November 2017. Can Mimi clear her name before the killer turns up the heat? Click here to order.










GRILLING THE SUBJECT, the 5th Cookbook Nook Mystery, is out!
The Wild West Extravaganza has come to Crystal Cove.
Click here to order.









FOR CHEDDAR OR WORSE, the 7th Cheese Shop Mystery is out!
Finally there's going to be a cheese festival in Providence!
Click to order.










GIRL ON THE RUN
                                a stand-alone suspense
When a fairytale fantasy night becomes a nightmare, 
Chessa Paxton must run for her life...but will the truth set her free? 
Click to order




DAY OF SECRETS

my new stand-alone suspense
A mother he thought was dead. A father he never knew. 
An enemy that wants them dead.
Click here to order.



27 comments:

  1. Wonderful recipe and sentiments on fear! My greatest fear, as a major Type A perfectionist, is failure/not doing everything perfectly. Thankfully I'm getting better with overcoming that, preferring the "progress not perfection" mindset instead. EMS591@aol.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do think age helps with the Type A fears. I'm definitely more mellow than I used to be. ~ Daryl

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  2. Oh, my! That sounds so good!!
    I guess my greatest fear is to die alone.
    harbingerdc(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If it helps, know that there will be others on the "other side" ready to greet you. I truly believe this. ~ Daryl

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  3. One can never have too much French food. And I love your phrase "unfurl the dough"--it sounds so triumphant.

    It may sound shallow, but I think I am most afraid of boredom--like being stuck somewhere without a book, or even a piece of paper to write on.

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    1. Sheila, I know what you mean about boredom. I hate that, too. I always need something to do - even if it's a nap! LOL ~Daryl

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  4. I adore French food and the Roquefort Tart will be perfect for a fall meal. My greatest fear, other than the ubiquitous pain, suffering and death, is to not have saved enough for retirement.
    little lamb lst at yahoo dot com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lil, I think that may be many people's fear right now. The world is quite topsy-turvy. Hang in there. ~ Daryl

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  5. Enticing and delectable recipe. My greatest fear has occurred. Poor health and suffering for 5 years. Before that I was healthy and strong. The before and after. Breast cancer, 5 surgeries and now RA. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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    Replies
    1. I'm so sorry. Hopefully you find comfort in reading and friends. Sending you cyber hugs. ~ Daryl

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  6. Looks like a must try recipe. Thanks. This is what is meant by the "variety is the spice of life". My fear is the same ole thing day after day. Boredom. Nothing worse. And you are quite right. Most all fears mellow with time. But not that of boredom. Della at deepotter (at) peoplepc (dot) com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You and Sheila could keep each other company online? LOL Wishing you no boredom. ~ Daryl

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  7. Well done, facing your fears.
    This sounds like a real winner. Onions and blue cheese? What's not to like?

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    Replies
    1. I know, right? Love the combination. This lasted well, too. ~ Daryl

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  8. Paula Jacobson
    The recipe looks yummy. My greatest fear is not making it on my salary. I'm always worried about money.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paula, you are not alone. As I mentioned above, these are trying times for so many. Hang in there. ~ Daryl

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  9. This looks amazing. Now I really dont have many fears, gave them up when I was diagnosed with m/s. Unfortunately I do have a bit of a fear when talking cooking - frying things. Just hate it. So I think I will have someone else make this for me, lol. Oh I do have a fear of bridges/heights, but I can deal with them. Cannot wait for this release. kayt18 (at) comcast (dot) net

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    Replies
    1. Kay, I understand the fear factor re: frying. I make sure I wear long mitts so I'm protected, if that helps. Re: bridges and heights. My husband had that fear. They don't get me. But he went somewhat pale with heights. Even when watching a movie with heights. ~ Daryl

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