Thursday, December 8, 2016

Mom's Swedish Coffee Bread or Finnish Cardamon Braid #bookgiveaway Linda Wiken author





I'm delighted to be kicking off our Christmas Week festivities here at Mystery Lovers' Kitchen!

My earliest memories of Christmas are not of decorations and gifts. Not even the Christmas Eve dinner of Lute fisk (the white fish cured in lye) with white cream sauce and boiled potatoes. Very traditional for this Swede-Finn family. Believe me, it was an acquired taste. It took me into my teens to finally appreciate it while my older sister still hasn't caught the bug.

My earliest, and fondest memory, is of my dad waking me up at the raw, dark hour of 5 AM on Christmas morning, bringing a cup of black coffee and slices of warm Swedish Coffee Bread to my bedside. (I started drinking coffee at a very early age -- we won't go there!).

That Swedish Coffee Bread sums up Christmas to me. It was baked with love and cardamon seed; served with joy and anticipation; and is something that could always be counted on. In preparing to bake, I don one of Mom's aprons, turn on the Nutracker CDs, and use her mortar and pestle for the cardamon seeds.


I've continued the tradition after the passing of my mom, and was most delighted to note that my grand-niece, Sarah Coughlin has her own version going in Nova Scotia. Well, actually, she got the recipe from my sister who thinks it was Mom's. A different version. A mystery! Sarah is a professional baker and she pulls off the most amazing taste treats. Her recipe calls this a Finnish Cardamon Braid and it looked fabulous when she posted it on Facebook earlier this week.

So, I thought I'd give it a try but I have done a couple of changes in keeping with the recipe I usually use. The other one from Mom. J




What you need:

6 1/2 c. pre-sifted all purpose flour
2 pkgs active dry yeast
2 c. warm water (about 110F)
1 tsp ground cardamom
2 large eggs, room temperature
1/3 c. sugar
1 tsp. salt
1/2 c. (1/4 lb.) butter or margarine, melted and cooled
1 tbsp. milk
sugar for topping





What to do:
 

1. Measure flour and pack lightly in a measuring cup. In a large bowl, pour 2 c. warm water and then sprinkle in the 2 packages of yeast. Let stand 3-5 minutes, or until the yeast blooms. 


2. Stir in the cardamom, 1 egg, 1/3 c. sugar, salt, milk, butter and about half the flour. Blend well with a wooden spoon until it becomes smooth and elastic. Gradually add remaining flour and continue stirring until soft and blended.

3. Turn out onto a lightly floured board and knead until smooth and satiny feeling. Place in a greased bowl, turning it over to grease the top. Cover and set in warm place to rise until about doubled in volume (about 1 hour).


4. Punch down, then turn out onto a lightly floured board, and knead until free of bubbles.


5. Divide into six equal portions or ropes about 1 inch wide. Roll each rope between your hands to make long strands, about 14 inches in length. Using 3 at a time, make 2 braids. Cover and let rise in warm place until puffy, about 30 min.


6. Brush with remaining egg, lightly beaten. Sprinkle with sugar, as much as you desire.

7. Bake in moderate oven (375F) for 20-25 min. or until richly browned. Cool on wire racks before slicing.



No need to say this, but enjoy!  (I like mine with an espresso each morning.)



MY CHRISTMAS TREAT FOR YOU IS A SIGNED COPY OF TOASTING UP TROUBLE. JUST LEAVE A COMMENT, ALONG WITH A CONTACT EMAIL ADDRESS, BEFORE SATURDAY MORNING TO BE INCLUDED IN THE DRAW!



The first in the Dinner Club Mysteries is available at your favorite bookstore and on-line, as a paperback and as an e-book.  
Recipes included!

Book #2, ROUX THE DAY, is coming in March, 2017!





Writing as Erika Chase -- the Ashton Corners Book Club Mystery series are available on-line or at your favorite bookstore.

             
Visit Linda at www.lindakwiken.com
Love to hear from you at my Facebook author page and
on Twitter  @LWiken  
Also appearing at www.killercharacters.com
                                                                               


Visit Erika at www.erikachase.com 
 at my Facebook author page
and on Twitter  @erika_chase. 


74 comments:

  1. Mmmm, Linda. Looks so good. scoobyvicki57@gmail.com

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  2. Thank you for sharing this recipe. I love that it yields enough for me to take to our family Christmas party. Looks delicious!
    TeacupsAndLipstick@gmail.com

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    1. I always give a loaf to my sister and her family. It does go a long way.

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  4. The bread sounds wonderful! And I would love to read Toasting UpTrouble. EMS591@aol.com

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    1. Thanks for commenting! Your name's in the draw.

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  5. Thanks for the recipe and the chance to win Toasting Up Trouble. mjbookaddict@gmail.com.

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  6. Welcome to our family and thank you for the recipe. I have already enjoyed your first book so good luck to someone else.

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  7. I'm going to try this recipe as I love the taste of cardomon. Thanks for the chance to win one of your books and a Merry Christmas to every one! dbahn(at)iw(dot)net

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  8. This recipe looks delightful! And thank you for the chance!
    karen(dot)kenyon(at)rogers(dot)com

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  9. My Swedish step-grandmother used to make a version of this--it smells wonderful while baking.

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  10. It's nice to have baking traditions for the holiday season. Thank you for the recipe and the giveaway! debprice60@gmail.com

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  11. Holiday family baking traditions are great to keep going. Both the Swedish and Finnish versions of this holiday bread sound delicious, Linda!

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    1. Thanks, Grace. It is fun. And who can go wrong with food!

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  12. I miss my Mom and her Swedish Tea Ring!! Thanks for the recipe. nschwenkner (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. Is it a similar recipe, Nancy? I must look it up.

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  13. I miss my Mom and her Swedish Tea Ring!! Thanks for the recipe. nschwenkner (at) gmail (dot) com

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  14. Thanks for this delectable recipe. This baking tradition is very special. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. It certainly is. It's a very important part of the holidays for me.

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  15. The bread looks yummy. norbert8bubba(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Thanks, Jamie. And, thanks for commenting.

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  16. Bread recipe looks good. Thanks for the chance to win. pwtish171@gmail.com

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    1. So nice of you to take the time to comment, Trish. Thanks.

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  17. Nothing smells as good as bread baking in the oven. I'll have to try your recipe. Thanks for the giveaway.
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com

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    1. The smell of the cardamom while baking is wonderful, Sue.

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  18. It's an interesting recipe. Take away the milk and cardamom seeds and you pretty much have the Challah bread we use for Sabbath meals every week.

    Wonderful interview and thank you for having a giveaway also.

    NoraAdrienne (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. I think that's the way with many cultures, Nora. Many similarities when you look at it.

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  19. Thanks for the chance to win. I just had breakfast but now your recipe made me hungry again! lol nerdsrgood AT msn DOT com

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  20. Thank you for this recipe! I am also of Finn/Swedish decent and I'm going to make this for Christmas for my grandfather who is from Finland! A.incashola@yahoo.com

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  21. What a yummy sounding recipe. Thank you for this opportunity to win a book and the wonderful recipe. I hope to enjoy both.
    mommomsworld(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  22. I love a good bread for breakfast. This one sounds & looks excellent. Thanks for the chance. turtle6422(at)gmail(dot)com

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    Replies
    1. It is tasty when toasted. Especially with a strong cup of coffee.

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  23. recipe looks good.....can't wait to try it. Thanks for the opportunity. kckendler at gmail dot com

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    1. Thanks for taking the time to comment, Kathleen.

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  24. Looks delicious and not too difficult! Colleenbyrne6@gmail.com Happy Holidays!

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  25. Isn't it wonderful when different family members keep the special food traditions going? Happy Holidays and thanks for the giveaway.
    sallycootie@gmail.com

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  26. Looks good! My dad had a Swedish father and "enjoyed" lutefisk from time to time. I think I'll pass on it myself.
    Pat
    patdupuy@yahoo.com

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  27. Thank you for the chance. jenne.turner@unt.edu

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  28. This sounds wonderful. I love cardamom.

    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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    1. I do also, Libby. Thanks for commenting.

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  29. What a wonderful family memory and recipe.Thanks for the chance! emmasmom69 AT gmail DOT com

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  30. would love to read this..
    greeneyes2755@yahoo.com

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  31. Awesome recipe and memory.donamaekutska7@gmail.com

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  32. The recipe looks amazing and fun to bake!! I would like to make it one of these days. The book looks exciting to read! Thank you for the giveaway slpathkp19@gmail.com

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  33. Oh Linda, this brought back wonderful memories of my Mom and her making her Swedish Cardamom bread. Last week I asked my daughter to take me to the Swedish bakery in the city near to us so that I could get some Limpa and a loaf of Swedish Rye plus the Cardamom Braid with Almond filling. (There was hardly enough filling, but it was Cardamom bread, ummm). My mother used to bake the Cardamom breads with a crumble on top and the Cardamom braids or braided rings with some type of sugar topping, similar to the raw sugar but it was white. She could have possibly used the mortar and pestle to chop up sugar cubes with the cardamom pods, I just cannot remember. Her recipes were either never written down or saved where I could find them so over the years I have adjusted recipes found in cookbooks to try to match my mother's flavors. It was the toppings that I loved so much and also a lot of cardamom in them which isn't what I find in the bakery items but at least it is one of my favorite breads to bring back those fond memories of my heritage. Thank you for a trip down memory lane.
    Linda, do you know of a Swedish version of cooked white fudge> I never found my Mom's recipe and still cannot match her flavors of this white fudge that was slightly beige in color probably since she used the cold water testing method and not a candy thermometer many times. I am really wanting to make up some of this fudge if anyone else has a recipe that sounds like what I am looking for. It tastes like their might be marshmallow in it or even brown sugar but I don't remember anything but white sugar being used. Perhaps it was canned milk and not fresh milk or cream, I just don't know but any recipes for cooked shite Swedish fudge would be so appreciated. Thank you.

    Cynthia

    ceblain AT tmlponline DOT net

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    1. It all sounds wonder, Cynthia. My Mom didn't make cooked white fudge but I'll bet it's delicious. I'll let you know if I come across a recipe.

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  34. I have never had cardamon bread before, but I had a friend who would always go to the Swedish bakery to have it for Christmas. Looks like a great recipe.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. I wish there was a Swedish bakery around here!

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  35. Your recipe looks delicious! Thank you for sharing your wonderful memory and recipe. Thank you for the opportunity to win a copy of your book. crossxjo @hotmail. com

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  36. Sounds yummy!!! Both the bread and the book!!! saracarver07@gmail.com

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  37. I don't know that I have ever tasted cardamom. I don't think my mom ever made any Swedish recipes for us. Her mother was 100% Swedish. The bread sounds tasty. Thanks for the recipe.
    lkish77123 at gmail dot com

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  38. Will need to try this sometime
    parkeremma2003 at yahoo dot com

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  39. This sounds good! Lefse is a Christmas tradition that I grew up with. But no lutefisk ever!

    ElaineE246 at msn dot com

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  40. That looks yummy. I have a lot of baking on my list over the next 2 weeks, I might be able to sneak this one in for us. =) I hope everyone is enjoying a safe holiday season. konecny7@gmail.com

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