Showing posts with label prosciutto. Show all posts
Showing posts with label prosciutto. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Luscious Peaches with Prosciutto Recipe




Thanks to the research I'm doing for my COOKBOOK NOOK MYSTERY series, I am amassing a whole new library of cookbooks. I can’t seem to help myself. All in the name of research.

I’ve mentioned this before, but peaches are my favorite fruit, and when they’re in season, I’m a nut for peaches. Thanks to a cookbook I found called the Perfect Peach, I’ve been inspired to make a spinach and peach salad and a peach cobbler. This weekend, I made a peach appetizer that was so simple my protagonist Jenna would shout, “Hooray!”

The authors of the cookbook, Nikiko and Masumoto, share wonderful memories throughout this book. I could spend hours reading of the farm and family. And the pictures...wow, wow!!!

For this particular recipe, the authors wanted something that reached out as a thank you to all the people who help them – in bringing produce to the table. 
Not just the farmer, but the workers on the farm, the people supplying the seeds, etc. You get the idea. It takes a village to make one meal. The story brought tears to my eyes.

So from my table (and the authors') to yours:

PEACH BASIL PROSCIUTTO
(tweaked slightly re: proportions)

To serve four people handsomely:

2 peaches sliced in eighths
1 pound prosciutto, cut into thin one-inch slices
12-16 large leaves of basil, rinsed, stem removed

Directions:

Slice the peaches
Slice the prosciutto
Prepare the basil

Lay one slice of peach in each basil leaf. Using a piece of prosciutto, wrap at the center around the peach/basil combo, twisting or pressing at the end so the prosciutto holds together.

That’s it!  EASY!!!

NOTE: In the Perfect Peach recipe, the skin of the peach is cut off. I prefer the skin on for texture. You can do either.

Also, my husband liked the peach with the prosciutto by itself, no basil. I happen to adore basil and loved the combination.

Eat to your heart’s content!



* * *


The first book in A Cookbook Nook Mystery series is out!!

FINAL SENTENCE
You can order the book HERE.

It's set in the fictional coastal town of Crystal Cove, California and features Jenna Hart, a former advertising exec who returns home to help her aunt open a culinary bookshop and café.

The 4th in A Cheese Shop Mystery series is out, too! 
TO BRIE OR NOT TO BRIE
You can order the book HERE. 

Next up: DAYS OF WINE AND ROQUEFORT preorder here
INHERIT THE WORD, available soon!

You can learn more about Daryl by clicking this LINK. "Like" my page on Facebook and "follow" me on TwitterAnd if you haven't done so, sign up for the mailing list so you can learn about upcoming events, releases, and contests! You can also follow and "like" Avery Aames the same way:  Facebook and Twitter














Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Chicken and Prosciutto Skewers

IMG_20110901_191729First off, congratulations to our very own Krista Davis on the launch of the next Domestic Diva mystery:

Labor Day weekend has traditionally meant the end of various things.

For many children, it means the end of summer vacation (not down here in the South, though—we start school early.)

It’s supposed to mean the end of wearing white shoes (I tend to ignore this and wear white sandals as long as I possibly can. :) )

The outdoor pools usually close after Labor Day until Memorial Day the next year.RileyAdamsFoodBlogPostpic_thumb_thumb[3]

And…some believe it’s time to put away the grill after Labor Day is over.

But we don’t have to! We can keep on grilling while wearing our white sandals, poolside.

With that in mind, here is a fun recipe for the grill that’s great for entertaining.

Chicken and Prosciutto Skewers

Ingredients
Chicken breast (cut into thirds, lengthwise—or use already sliced tenderloins)
Balsamic dressing for marinade
Dates or figs
Prosciutto (enough to wrap each chicken strip)
Skewers

Preheat your grill to medium heat. Marinate the chicken in balsamic dressing for at least 30 minutes in the fridge. Cut the dates or figs in half (pit the date first, if using dates). Wrap the Prosciutto around the marinated chicken breast and date/fig and thread onto skewer. Grill until the chicken is cooked, turning frequently (about 5 minutes for each side, or until juices run clear and chicken is no longer pink).

Fight back against the end of summer! :)

Riley/Elizabeth
Finger Lickin’ Dead (Riley Adams)
Progressive Dinner Deadly ($2.99 on Kindle—Elizabeth Craig)

Wednesday, June 1, 2011

Bruschetta Open-Faced Sandwich

RileyAdamsFoodBlogPostpic_thumb_thumb[3] I had a great time at my book club meeting last Thursday.

The book itself was interesting, the discussion was lively, but the very best part was visiting with my friends—and the food that was there!

My friend Corby was the book club hostess for May and she’d prepared a delicious bruschetta open-faced sandwich that all the club members oohed over! So of course I thought I’d share it with you here. The construction of the sandwich is quick and so is the cooking time…but you do need to put aside an hour for the caramelized onions. Corby said that if you try to cheat, it just doesn’t taste the same. And this dish was too delish to mess up!

Bruschetta Open-Faced Sandwich

IMG_20110526_193101

Ingredients:

A take-and–bake loaf of artisan bread
2 -3 onions sliced Caramelized onions
(sauté on low with olive oil and a little butter for about an hour) Take your time because the onions will be sweeter.
1 large Mozzarella ball, sliced
2 medium sized tomatoes cut into thin slices
1/4 pound prosciutto
balsamic vinegar blend (about 1/4 cup)
1/4 cup fresh basil
A seasoning blend (like Nature’s Seasons)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut the loaf of bread in half. Layer these ingredients on the top of the loaf halves—prosciutto on the bottom, then sliced tomatoes, then the caramelized onions. Place the Mozzarella on the top then bake according to the bread instructions (about 10 minutes.) After removing the bread from the oven, add the basil, balsamic blend, and your seasoning mix.

IMG_20110526_193055One of the nice things is that it still seemed like a fairly light meal---perfect for summer. And it wasn’t as messy to eat as it looks in the picture…which is important when you’re at a party or book club!

Coming June 7!
imageFINGER LICKIN' DEAD by Riley Adams
Riley/Elizabeth
Delicious and Suspicious (Riley Adams)
Finger Lickin’ Dead—June 7 (book 2 of the Memphis BBQ series!)

Friday, April 2, 2010

Cleo Coyle's Italian Easter Pie Palmiers



Every year at Pasqua, my late Aunt Mary would make her Easter Pie. This rustic pie was amazing to me not because it was filled with dozens of ingredients, but because it was so satisfying yet so simple. She called it a "pizza," but Americans would probably recognize it as closer to a white calzone.

My aunt would fill her rustic Easter pie with ricotta; diced ham; fresh parsley (always fresh!); strong, grated Italian cheese; and raw eggs for binding. 



Cleo Coyle has a partner in
crime-writing—her husband.
Learn about their books
by clicking here and here.

She'd mix up a delicious, slightly sweet dough using just her hands on a big bread board. Then she'd roll our the dough, mound in the filling, fold over the dough, seal it, and bake it. After it was baked and chilled (yes, chilled!), we would cut thin slices and eat it at all hours -- for breakfast, lunch, snacks, as an appetizer before dinner, or a savory dessert after.

Italian Easter Pies are a famous tradition, but the recipe can differ from house to house. In our neighborhood that was quite literal. The family next door made a much more elaborate pie with sausage, whole boiled eggs, and a bread-like yeast crust. Other families make theirs in a pie tin with spinach as an ingredient.

My Aunt Mary Capaccio
I greatly miss my Aunt Mary. She came to the USA from Italy (with my mother), lived with us during my childhood, and (in so many ways) was like a second mother to me and my sister. Aunt Mary passed away almost exactly ten years ago, and I still yearn for all the wonderful foods she made for our family. Although I do try to duplicate her recipes, it's the cooking from her heart that I miss the most.

That's why I am dedicating my post to her today with the tastes of her Easter Pie folded into a palmier. The French palmier (a cookie made of sugar-dusted puff pastry) is actually named after a palm leaf, but the shape reminds me more of a heart and that seemed just perfect for my memory of Aunt Mary and her Easter Pie. I can also testify that a bite of this palmier (after it is baked and chilled) will give you an almost identical taste to what my aunt made every Easter.


Buona Pasqua, Aunt Mary!
Happy Easter, everyone!
~ Cleo




Cleo Coyle's
Easter Pie
Palmiers

Makes 10 savory palmiers

Serve as an appetizer or snack; taste can be compared to a quiche.

For a printable, sendable, saveable
(pdf) version of this
recipe, click here

Ingredients

1 cup ricotta cheese (whole milk)
2 tablespoons grated Pecorino Romano cheese
1/2 cup flat leaf Italian parsley (fresh!), finely chopped
1 sheet of Pepperidge Farm puff pastry (or 10 x 10-inch homemade)
1 egg, lightly beaten
5 thin slices of good quality ham or prosciutto

Method

Step 1: Mix the filling - In a small bowl, mix the ricotta, grated Romano, and finely chopped fresh parsley. (I just use a good handful, which is about 1/2 cup. When you chop it finely, the volume measure goes down to 1/4 cup.) This filling should be very well mixed--be sure to work in all of the grated cheese and parsley. Set aside in the fridge to keep it cold.

Step 2: Prepare the pastry - Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. The paper is mandatory. Not only will it help prevent your palmiers from scorching on your pan's hot spots, it will help you fold the puff pastry when the time comes. Lay the puff pastry out on the parchment paper. Use your favorite recipe or go with the Pepperidge Farm frozen puff pastry sheets. If you've never used these before, see the photo below...



Two folded sheets of puff pastry come in one package. Take out one sheet and allow it to thaw about 30 minutes (or you can cheat and microwave it on low for no more than 10 seconds to thaw it slightly). Now unfold the dough. If there are any cracks, wet your finger and press the dough together to mend it. TIP: Handle the dough as little as possible and keep it cold during the assembly process by returning it to the fridge to re-chill.

Step 3: Brush and layer - Lightly beat the egg and brush it over the entire sheet of puff pastry. Then mound the ricotta cheese mixture onto the egg-washed pastry. Use a rubber spatula or the back of a spoon to smooth the filling into an even layer. Now lay your thin slices of ham (or prosciutto) over the top layer of ricotta and fold.



Step 4: Fold - You want to fold this 10 x 10-inch sheet like a letter, into thirds and then a final time so that the two folded layers are stacked. I like to use the parchment paper to lift and fold, which prevents my hands from warming the puff pastry.





Step 5: Chill and slice - Chill the dough for at least 20 minutes and then cut into 1-inch slices. The chilling is necessary for the best result. If the dough is warm, it will begin to give and bend as you cut it, and you're palmiers will not hold their pretty shapes. Set the slices on their sides, leaving room between each to allow space for expansion while baking.




Step 6 - Bake and cool - Bake 15 to 20 minutes in an oven that is well pre-heated to 400 degrees F. The Easter Pie Palmiers are done when the pastry has puffed and turned golden brown. Remove the pan from the oven and allow the palmiers to cool a bit before carefully transferring to a rack. Allow these savory goodies to cool to room temperature before eating. If you want to experience the true taste of a traditional Italian Easter Pie, then chill these a bit in the fridge, take them out, and...








Eat with joy!

~ Cleo Coyle

New York Times bestselling author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries

Yes, this is me, Cleo (aka Alice). 
Friend me on facebook here.
Follow me on twitter here
Visit my online coffeehouse here.

☕ ☕ ☕

Free Coffeehouse Mystery
E-Newsletter here.






☕ ☕ ☕ ☕ ☕

Coming from Penguin Random House...

The NEW Coffeehouse Mystery!


On sale January 10, 2017

Filled with wonderful twists
and surprises, this is one
Coffeehouse Mystery you
won't want to miss!


To pre-order now, click links for... 




* * *


Our newest bestselling hardcover 
is now a bestseller in paperback!


Join amateur sleuth Clare Cosi
as she sets out to caffeinate
our nation's capital and solve
a capital crime.


To buy now, click links for...



☕ ☕ ☕




This culinary mystery includes

more than 25 delicious new recipes! 

Get a free Recipe Guide by 





* * *


The bestselling Penguin hardcover 
is now a bestseller in paperback!


Once Upon a Grind 
by Cleo Coyle

To learn more, 


A Best of the Year Pick ~ Kings River Life 
"Fresh and fun...clever" ~ Booklist
A Mystery Guild Selection 



Join coffeehouse manager Clare Cosi as she solves the crime against "Sleeping Beauty," opens secret doors (uptown and down), and investigates a cold case that's been unsolved since the Cold War.

*

Wonderful recipes are also featured
in Cleo's 14th culinary mystery, Once Upon a Grind including...



* Dairy-Free "Cinderella" Pumpkin Cake
* Dairy-Free Almond Milk Custard
* Caramel-Dipped Meltaway Cookies 
* Black Forest Brownies 
* Cappuccino Blondies 
* Shrimp Kiev
* Dr Pepper Glazed Chicken
* Silver Dollar Chocolate Chip Cookies
* Poor Man's Caviar
* Snow White Chocolate Mocha

...and many more recipes, including 
a guide to reading coffee grinds...

See Once Upon a Grind's 
Recipe Guide by clicking here.



* * *







See Billionaire Blend's Free 
Recipe Guide by clicking here.



* * *



The Coffeehouse Mysteries are bestselling
works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark
Greenwich Village coffeehouse, and each of the
15 titles includes the added bonus of recipes. 


GET A FREE
TITLE CHECKLIST 
OF BOOKS IN ORDER


See mini plot summaries 
for every title and news on
 Cleo's next release!




****







Book #1 of
which Cleo write under the name 
Alice Kimberly


Haunted Bookshop 
Mysteries

Get a free title checklist, with 
mini plot summaries, by clicking here.


Or learn more about the books
and meet Jack Shepard,
our PI ghost by clicking here.

* * * * * *


Comments and
Questions!



To leave a comment or 
question for Cleo, click here
and visit the
Coffee Talk Message Board 
at her online coffeehouse.




* * * 



Subscribe to Cleo's Coffeehouse Newsletter for bonus recipes, fun info, and drawings for free books, premium coffee and more....






Top 10
New York Times
Bestseller!



A Coffeehouse 
Holiday Mystery!

Click here for
Free Recipe Guide

👓 👓 👓