Showing posts with label peppers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label peppers. Show all posts

Friday, August 4, 2017

Dinner by Color

Often I choose what I buy at the market and what I decide to make for dinner based on a flavor I'm craving, or because I found something new and unexpected in the market, or there's a fruit or vegetable that has a very short season and I'd better grab it immediately. This meal was based on color.




We eat fish once a week on average, and that means a lot of salmon, which is a wonderful color. But then I saw some beautiful variegated sweet peppers (new to our market) and realized how nicely they went with the salmon. But I needed a recipe that highlighted the peppers--if I just added them to the salmon, their impact would be lost.




Then I stumbled upon something I'd never seen before: black bean pasta. I did a double-take. Yes, it's pasta, made solely from beans. What's more, it's black. It's made in Italy. So of course I had to try it--and then I realized that it would be the perfect background for those pretty peppers.

Voila! A meal is born!

I borrowed a recipe for the salmon from the market where all these ingredients came together--Hannaford. They have a carousel of fish recipes, many of which I've used (no other recipes on site, though--wonder why). I tweaked it a bit, and I cut it in half to serve just the two of us, but it's quick and easy and tasty.

Baked Glazed Salmon with Black Pasta

Ingredients:

2 pounds salmon filet

1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
3 Tblsp soy sauce
2 Tblsp fresh lime juice

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a baking dish large enough to hold your fish in a single layer.

To make the glaze, blend the ingredients in a bowl until the sugar dissolves.




Place the salmon, skin side down, in the baking dish. Pour the glaze over it and turn the fish to coat both sides (bake skin side up).




Bake for 15-20 minutes, basting with the glaze every few minutes. Do not overcook--the salmon should stay bright pink inside.




Before or while the salmon is cooking, julienne the peppers (leave the pieces large enough so you can see the color variations) and saute lightly in olive oil.




Prepare the pasta according to the package directions, then drain. Add the cooked peppers with their oil and toss to cover the pasta. 

Put the salmon portions and the plates and add a portion of the pasta. Spoon or pour any of the remaining glaze over all and serve. Enjoy!




Okay, I was getting a little punchy, and the pepper pieces were too pretty to throw away, so this is what I did:



Books! I'm writing or planning a lot of books (four over the next year, that I know of, and maybe a few short stories). But the next one to appear is A Late Frost (Orchard Mystery #11), making its debut in November.



Believe it or not, farmers do have some slack times in their schedule, which is why the town of Granford decided to hold a WinterFare in February, to chase away the blahs--unfortunately with fatal results.

www.sheilaconnolly.com

Friday, July 7, 2017

Easy Corn Casserole

I can’t believe I haven’t shared this recipe before! (I did search for it in my computer files but came up blank—if you’ve seen it before, I’m the one who’s crazy, not you.) I found it in a magazine sometime in the 1980s, when I was living in California, and it became one of my go-to recipes. It’s a big hit at pot-lucks because it tastes good hot or at room temperature, and it travels well.

Corn Casserole


Ingredients:

2 cups fresh corn kernels 


     (or use frozen but let thaw)
1/2 cup butter, melted
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 cup diced Monterey Jack cheese
1/2 cup cornmeal
1 4-oz. can diced green chiles
1 tsp salt

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 350F.

Generously butter a 2-quart casserole dish.

Puree 1 cup of the corn kernels with melted butter and eggs in blender/food processor.





Mix remaining ingredients (including the rest of the corn) in a medium bowl. Add the pureed mixture and blend well. 






Pour into casserole and bake, uncovered, for 50-60 minutes, or until lightly browned.








Simple, isn’t it? Which is why I’ve been using it all these years. But! (drumroll, please) I was feeling creative recently, so I came up with a very different variation, which turned out much better than I expected. Stay tuned for next week’s post!


And don't miss out on our giveaway drawings! Yes, drawings with an S, because we're going to pick five winners! For details click on the cheerleaders on the left sidebar!

Friday, March 18, 2016

Spring Fever Pasta

Spring! I finally saw my first crocus! The lilacs have buds! I am positively giddy, and I may have gone a little crazy in the supermarket this past weekend. I’ll blame it on spring fever.



I promised you a recipe that wasn’t fish or cookies (or even Irish!). I was mulling over options when I found myself in the vegetable section of our local market and saw one of those bags of tiny peppers, in vivid yellow, orange and red. Ooh, pretty! (Hey, it’s been a long, dull, brown winter in New England.) Then I turned around and there was a basket of tiny tomatoes in the same colors. Light bulb moment!

And if that wasn’t enough, I had some humongous carrots waiting at home (they label them Rainbow Carrots, and they come in shades of orange, yellow and red). That clinched it. I wanted bright! Sunny! Cheerful!

I grabbed a package of fresh chives for color contrast and headed home to throw together a quick and easy pasta dish. This one’s simple, once you get done cutting up your vegetables.


Spring Fever Pasta

1 bag mini sweet peppers (in assorted colors)
1 package tiny tomatoes (likewise)
1 giant carrot (or a couple of smaller ones)
A bunch of fresh chives (use plenty, because 
they give a bit of onion flavor to the dish,
   as well as color)
Olive oil for cooking

Pasta of your choice (I used fettucine, but the kind doesn’t make much difference. This amount of sauce was about right for 12 ounces of pasta (not quite a full supermarket box), or two servings for hungry adults.)

Salt and pepper to taste


Chopped!

Rinse your peppers and tomatoes. For the peppers, cut off the stems and remove the seeds and any thick membranes. Cut into julienne strips. For the tomatoes, halve or quarter them (depending on size) and remove the seeds.

Teeny tiny cutters
Now here’s another crazy part. I love buying the colored carrots. They all taste about the same, but the colored ones are pretty. For some reason, recently the ones in our market have been immense (although reasonably tender), and I had a few left. I grabbed the pale yellow one.

I also had a set of miniature cutters, which I think was one of my flea market finds. It turned out they were all of tiny birds and animals. I looked at my giant carrot, and I looked at my cutters—and I decided to make birds and bunnies. (I could have made cows, but that made less sense to me.) So, peel your carrot(s), slice thinly, and cut out whatever shapes you feel like (that will fit inside a carrot slice). Or if you’re a normal sensible person, just julienne them like the rest of the vegetables.




Put on your pasta water to boil. Read the label, because cooking time for pasta is all over the map. Mine happened to need 11 minutes cooking time, which I figured was about right for putting together the sauce. Once the water came to a boil, I added the pasta and then turned to the sauce.


See? Fish and birds
In a sauté pan, heat enough olive oil to cover the bottom over medium heat. Put in the carrots (they will take the longest to cook) and cook a couple of minutes until they’re softened. Add the peppers and continue to cook for a few more minutes. Add the tomatoes and let them release their juices for a couple of minutes. Toss in the chives last. Add salt and pepper as needed.




Drain the pasta and place a serving in individual bowls. Spoon the vegetables over the top. Add a sprinkle of parmesan cheese if you like, or just enjoy the flavor of the vegetables on their own. And take a moment to enjoy the colors!






A Turn for the Bad is still sailing along.

Find it at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.











 









And coming in June: Dead End Street, the next book in the Museum Mystery series.

The New York Times bestselling author of Privy to the Dead returns to Philadelphia for more history—and a chilling mystery . . .
 
When the Pennsylvania Antiquarian Society discovers it owns some unique real estate, a deadly plot unfolds . . .
 
Society president Nell Pratt believes life is finally going her way. Everything’s running smoothly at work, and her love life is thriving. Then some unexpected news rocks her foundation. Two members of a local neighborhood rescue program, Tyrone Blakeney and Cherisse Chapman, inform Nell that her society owns an abandoned row house in a rundown area of Philadelphia and they insist on taking her to see the property before its date with the wrecking ball.
 
But soon after they arrive at the house, Cherisse is fatally shot and Tyrone is badly injured. The police believe it’s just random violence in a bad neighborhood, but Nell thinks there’s more to it and is determined to find answers before someone else becomes history . . .

Available for pre-order at Amazon and Barnes and Noble



www.sheilaconnolly.com

Saturday, October 17, 2015

Baked Peppers with Cream #Recipe @pegcochran

This recipe comes from Williams Sonoma Simple Classics Cookbook which I bought at a used book sale at the library.  I can't imagine anyone selling this lovely book unless they'd given up cooking!  The recipes are classic as the title says and relatively easy but spectacular enough for guests.

I've taken a few liberties with the recipe.  Peppers were $1 each at my grocery store which was a very good price--they're usually way more than that.  I bought two without having any specific use in mind.  I used a yellow pepper and an orange one.  There are only two of us so I scaled down the recipe for us, but I'll give you the original quantities as they are in the cookbook.

1.5 lbs. red peppers (I don't see any reason why you can't use other colors--just not green peppers which aren't sweet enough.)
2 TBL minced shallots (I used minced onion--didn't have any shallots)
6-8 basil leaves sliced thinly 
3/4 cup heavy cream
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 500 degrees

I used two peppers for the two of us

Cut peppers in half and remove seeds and stem

Place peppers cut side down on a baking sheet and place in oven.  

Roast until skins blister and blacken.

Cover with foil and let sit for 10 to 15 minutes then remove skin

I used two small dishes.  If you are making the full recipe you will want to use a larger baking dish.  Place half the minced shallots (or onions in my case) and basil on the bottom of your buttered dish.

Place peppers in prepared baking dish and sprinkle remainder of shallots and basil on top and drizzle with cream.  Bake at 375 degrees until the cream thickens and the peppers soften--30 to 35 minutes.

Enjoy! The peppers are delicious with roast chicken or a grilled steak.
~ Bon Appetit! ~
There are some yummy recipes in my first Cranberry Cove book--Berried Secrets!  Available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble
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Tuesday, August 11, 2015

What Single Ingredient May Prolong Your Life? Cleo Coyle Shares it in this Recipe




A single ingredient may prolong your life?


Yes, I know. It sounds more like the hook for an infomercial than the summation of a respected medical study, but...

Last week, the BMJ (British Medical Journal) released the findings from a huge study suggesting the humble chili pepper and its many varieties may do more than spice up your life—it may actually prolong it. 




To watch a fun, little 2-minute CBC News
video on the findings, click the arrow in the window below....



********




If you do not see the video above, click here to view it.


************



According to the study, eating spicy foods once or twice a week appeared to lower the risk of mortality by 10%, when compared with those who ate spicy foods less often or not at all. Those who consumed spicy foods six or seven days a week appeared to fare even better, with a 14% lower risk of mortality.

The study has encouraged the medical community to do more research into these findings and into the benefits of hot peppers.



Why Heat May Help Your Health

One component in chili peppers, capsaicin, reduces inflammation in the body, which is believed to help prevent many diseases, including cancer. Spicy foods also raise the heart rate, which improves circulation and brain function. Other studies have shown that hot red chili peppers release endorphins in our bodies, which make us feel good.


Today I'm sharing a recipe that will make
your 
taste buds feel good, too...





Honey-Glazed Garlic Chicken with Jalapeños

Marc and I inhale this dish when we make it. It's fast, easy, full of very healthful ingredients, and delivers delectable flavor. It also uses the most common chili pepper in America, the humble jalapeno

Fresh chili peppers gave the best results in the cited longevity study, and we love slicing up fresh jalapenos for salsa, burgers, and sandwiches. 



The good news is the milder hot peppers deliver the health benefits mentioned above, so you don't have to eat anything as hot as, say... the Carolina Reaper (pictured below), which currently holds the world's hottest pepper title from the Guinness Book of World Records.


Behold the hottest pepper in the world: 
The Carolina Reaper, created in
South Carolina by cross-breeding
two very hot parents, and, no, today's 
recipe does not require that 
you use one!




Cleo Coyle has a partner in 
crime-writing—her husband.
Learn about their books
by clicking here or here.

Cleo Coyle's Honey-Glazed 
Garlic Chicken with Jalapeños

This is a one-skillet stovetop dinner with a quick marinating process and a fast final glaze that's fantastic. 

The heat of the jalapenos is nicely controlled by the honey, which brings the spice level to a very pleasant warmthas opposed to a call-the-fire-department barn burner. The cumin lends an earthy flavor, and the lemon juice brings a nice brightness to the balance. 

May you eat it with joy and in good health!

~ Cleo


Click here to download
the free PDF
To download this recipe in a free PDF document that you can print, save, or share, click here! 





Makes 6 chicken thighs 

Ingredients:

2 Jalapeno chili peppers, chopped and divided*
10 cloves garlic, minced and divided
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 Tablespoon fresh-squeezed lemon juice
1/4 cup olive oil, plus 2 Tablespoons
6 chicken thighs, skin on
1 teaspoon coarsely ground sea salt (or kosher salt)
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup honey (any kind will work, but we suggest a raw local honey)

*Note: When working with jalapenos or any hot pepper, take care not to touch your eyes or you’ll feel the burn. Wash hands after handling. 
Also, make sure you discard all of the seeds and the white pulp, which is where the less pleasant heat hides. 

Step 1 - Make the Fast Marinade: Cut 1 of your 2 jalapenos in half, remove the seeds and chop the flesh. Place the chopped jalapenos in a re-sealable plastic bag. Wash hands well. Mince 5 of your 10 garlic cloves. Place the minced garlic in the bag and measure in the cumin, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, and lemon juice. Shake the bag well to blend. 





Step 2 - Chicken in the Bag: Rinse the chicken and pat dry. Salt and pepper both sides and place the pieces in a plastic bag. Seal the bag and gently shake it, upside down and back and forth, manipulating the chicken inside to make sure the pieces are well coated. Marinate in refrigerator for 2 to 3 hours.

Step 3 - Brown the Chicken: Place your ¼ cup of olive oil in a large nonstick skillet, heat on stovetop at medium-high. When the oil is very hot, place the thighs skin side down and cook for 8 minutes, or until the skin is browned. Flip the thighs over and reduce the heat to medium until the thighs are cooked through, this will take about 20-25 minutes. (Do not cover the pan at any time.) 





Step 4 - Glaze and finish: While the chicken cooks, mince the remaining 5 cloves of your garlic, and chop the final jalapeno (after removing the seeds). Mix these in a small bowl with your 1/3 cup of honey and thin this glazing mixture slightly with 1 or 2 tablespoons of chicken pan drippings. When the thighs are ready, turn the heat back up to medium-high and pour the honey-garlic-jalapeno glazing mixture over the chicken. Cook 5-7 minutes more, uncovered, until the mixture reduces to a savory sauce, and...






Click here to download
the free PDF, and...


May you eat with joy 

and in good health!



Fun Foodie Note

KEEPING YOUR CULINARY COOL

Did you know dairy is the only substance that neutralizes a chili burn?
If your mouth is on fire, don't reach for water, reach for milk or yogurt or ice cream. And, of course, a sour cream dollop is a delightful addition to 
many highly spicy meals.

Q. Why does dairy soothe a pepper burn? Will coconut milk, nut milks, or soy milk work?

A. Chemically speaking, capsaicin in peppers binds with lipoprotein receptors on the tongue, which causes the pepper burn. Drinking water does not help because capsaicin doesn’t dissolve in water. The most effective cure is mammal's milk because it contains casein, a substance which acts on capsaicin the same way soap cuts grease. But it must be mammal’s milk because coconut milk, other nut milks, and soy milk do not contain casein.


~ Cleo Coyle

New York Times bestselling author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries 




Friend me on facebook here. * Follow me on twitter here
Learn about my books here

* * *

Once Upon a Grind:
A Coffeehouse Mystery

New paperback edition
releasing September 1, 2015...

To learn more, click here
or on the cover below...


* A Best Book of the Year
Reviewer's Pick - Kings River Life

* Top Pick! ~ RT Book Reviews 
* Fresh Pick ~ Fresh Fiction 
* A Mystery Guild Selection


Join coffeehouse manager 
Clare Cosi as she solves the crime 
against "Sleeping Beauty," opens 
secret doors (uptown and down), 
and investigates a cold case that's 
been unsolved since the Cold War.


Wonderful recipes are also featured in Cleo's 14th 
culinary mystery, Once Upon a Grind, including...

* Dairy-Free "Cinderella" Pumpkin Cake
* Snow White Chocolate Mocha 
* Black Forest Brownies 
* Cappuccino Blondies 
* Shrimp Kiev
* Dr Pepper Glazed Chicken
* Silver Dollar Chocolate Chip Cookies
* Caramel-Dipped Meltaways
* Poor Man's Caviar

...and many more recipes, including
a guide to reading coffee grinds...



See the book's
Recipe Guide


* * * 

*Starred Review 
~ Kirkus

A Coffeehouse Mystery 

"Top Pick"  -RT Book Reviews
"...a highly satisfying mystery."
-Publishers Weekly



See Billionaire Blend's
Recipe Guide


* * * * * * 



The Coffeehouse Mysteries are bestselling
works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark
Greenwich Village coffeehouse, and each of the
14 titles includes the added bonus of recipes. 



GET A FREE
TITLE CHECKLIST
(with mini plot summaries)



* * * 


Marc and I also write
The Haunted Bookshop Mysteries

Get a free title checklist, 
with mini plot summaries, 



Or learn more about the 
books and meet Jack Shepard, 
our PI ghost by clicking here.




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Thanks for stopping by the Kitchen! 

Cleo