Showing posts with label pancakes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label pancakes. Show all posts

Saturday, May 28, 2016

Whole Wheat Sour Cream Pancakes with Blueberries, Strawberries and Maple Whipped Cream #recipe #mystery @abbottmysteries

BY MARY JANE MAFFINI aka VICTORIA ABBOTT







Sometimes things just come together!  We had weekend guests, a new griddle on our stove, a new pancake flipper and a supply of berries, plus some whole wheat flour from our nearby mill.  Snooping through and combining recipes with our own favorite flavors (maple syrup) and methods resulting in these very tasty pancakes.  We loved them!








Whole Wheat Sour Cream Pancakes with Blueberries, Strawberries and Whipped Cream



1 cup whole wheat pastry flour + 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, sifted
3 Tbsp sugar
1 Tbsp maple syrup
1 tsp lemon zest (optional but delicious)
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/2 cup full-fat sour cream
3/4 cup milk
2 extra large eggs at room temperature
2 tsp pure vanilla extract
2/3 cup fresh blueberries (frozen would be fine too)
3 - 4 strawberries, chopped, plus extras for garnish
canola or other quality vegetable oil for griddle
3/4  cup whipping cream
2 Tbsp flavoring for cream: sugar, maple syrup or liqueur
butter for topping pancakes (optional)

Directions:

Whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, zest and salt in a bowl.  In another bowl combine sour cream, milk, eggs, vanilla extract and maple syrup.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry ones and mix until just combined. Don't overbeat! Lumps are your friend.


Add the blueberries and strawberries.

Whip cream with flavoring until thick. Set aside.



Pre-heat the griddle (or skillet if you're using)  Pour the pancake batter 1/3 cup or less at a time and cook until bubbles appear on top and pop.


Next time, I'll try 1/4 cup. The bottom should be golden.  We invested in this great pancake flipper on a whim and we love it.


 Flip the pancakes over and cook for another minute or so until they are nice and brown.



Stack 'em high. Serve with whipped cream and berry garnish if that suits you, or maple syrup and/or butter.



Enjoy!


You can save any extras (again in a bag!) in fridge for a day or so or in the freezer.  When you are craving pancakes, just pop a couple in the toaster.



TIP: make sure your baking powder is less than six months old or it won't perform as well. Are we the last people in the world to learn this?

This was a terrific warm weather brunch and we enjoyed it outside in the screened porch






Good-bye winter! Hello, berries!

The shadowy body known as VICTORIA ABBOTT is collaboration between artist and photographer Victoria Maffini and her mother Mary Jane, author of three mystery series.  Together they write the book collector mysteries.  








 By the way, we  (THAT'S VICTORIA ABBOTT) are very excited that THE MARSH MADNESS was shortlisted for a Bony Blithe Award, for 'mysteries that make us smile'.




We think THE MARSH MADNESS might make YOU smile. If you haven't read it yet, it's easy to get!  HERE  Or ask your favorite bookseller.  

And if you have read it, then keep in mind that THE HAMMETT HEX is now ready for pre-order.




Or wherever you like to order books!





Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Fiction and Flapjacks for Fat Tuesday by Cleo Coyle #MardisGras #PancakeDay




The making and eating of pancakes is an old tradition for Fat Tuesday (aka Mardis Gras) that came from people wanting to use up their lard (fat) and rich ingredients before Lent began.

Because writing fiction with recipes is our business, my husband and I decided to do a roundup of fiction and pancake recipes for you today, one we hope you’ll flip for...



Hey, no groaning. Puns are our business, too.

~ Cleo





* In an 1844 letter to Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne reported that just as he ran out of beef and bread, two local women delivered to him a plate of "specially good flapjacks, piping hot," in what is perhaps the first mention of pancakes by an American literary figure.

Perfect Pumpkin Pancakes with warm
Butter Pecan Syrup

When we think of Mr. Hawthorne, we think of great American writing, which is why we'd pair him with our Pumpkin Pancakes, a recipe that makes good use of a great American squash.

To get our recipe, click here.









* In the 1899 collection In a Far Country, Jack London wrote about the harsh conditions in the Yukon during the Alaska Gold Rush, where he wintered in a log cabin, and subsisted on flapjacks cooked in bacon grease and soaked in sugar water, in lieu of maple syrup.


The Best Oatmeal Pancakes
with a dairy-free option


Mr. London's dietary plight eventually turned tragic. His consistently poor diet is what helped lead to his early demise. During those days in the Klondike, he suffered from scurvy, which is why we'd suggest our nutritious and fiber-rich Oatmeal Pancakes (with a glass of orange juice)!

To get our recipe, click here.






* In the short story "Big Two-Hearted River," Ernest Hemingway’s character Nick Adams meditates upon the proper way to prepare and flip pancakes. 

Buckwheat Pancakes with
gluten-free and dairy-free options
Because the story explores the regenerative power of nature (contrasted with the destructive qualities of war), we would suggest our nutty, hearty Buckwheat Pancakes. Despite its name, "buckwheat" is not any kind of wheat. It's an ancient grain that comes from a fruit seed via a plant related to rhubarb. Healthy and delicious, it's also a lovely example of those rejuvenating powers of nature.

Our recipe (click here) includes gluten-free and dairy-free options.




* In The Maltese Falcon, one of the earliest examples of the hardboiled detective novel, Dashiell Hammett coined the slang term "a stack of wheats" to describe a tough guy’s pancake breakfast.

Old-Fashioned
Buttermilk Pancakes













We think Mr. Hammet and his famous detective Sam Spade would flip for a stack of old-fashioned buttermilk pancakes, the kind you'd down at a diner with a hot cuppa joe.







To download the recipe (below) in a free PDF that you can print, save, or share, click here.


Click for the free PDF or scroll down for the recipe...

Cleo Coyle has a partner in 
crime-writing—her husband. 
Learn about their books 
by clicking here and here.


Cleo's Old-fashioned
Buttermilk Pancakes

Yields: 12 pancakes (about 5 inches in diameter)

Ingredients:

4 Tablespoons butter, melted
4 eggs
1-1/2  to 2-1/2 cups low-fat buttermilk
         (or regular milk with 1 tsp lemon juice)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 Tablespoons white, granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
3 teaspoons baking powder

Directions:

Step 1 - Make Batter: Melt the butter and set aside to cool a bit. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, vanilla, and 1-1/2 cups of the buttermilk (or regular milk with lemon added). Add flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, and finally the melted butter. Stir together the ingredients into a lumpy batter, do not over-mix. Now consider the thickness of the batter.

Step 2 - Adjust Thickness: 
If you like thicker, heavier pancakes, you may be good to go at this point. I usually add 1/2 cup or more of buttermilk (or milk). Depending on your climate, you may need to add even more to get the batter to your desired thickness (or thinness). Again, the batter should be lumpy, not smooth, and do not over-mix or you'll develop the gluten in your flour and your pancakes will be tough instead of tender.

Step 3 - Ladle, Flip, and Serve: You can either make the pancakes immediately or allow the batter to sit in the refrigerator (and hydrate) for up to an hour. Ladle the batter onto a pre-heated, non-stick griddle or skillet. TIP: If you have a good quality, non-stick griddle or skillet that's completely clean of residue, you will see prettier pancake results without oil or grease. Butter, cooking spray, and oil will all produce mottled surfaces on your cakes. When the tops begin to bubble, flip. Serve with butter and syrup. These pancakes are amazing when served with homemade blueberry syrup/compote. See the recipe below...




Cleo Coyle's
Fresh Blueberry Syrup/Compote

Yields: 2 cups of amazingly delicious syrup/compote

Ingredients:

2 pints blueberries
1/2 cup white, granulated sugar
1/2 cup water


Directions: Place all ingredients in a bowl and lightly stir until all sugar is dissolved. Allow to stand 30 mintues to an hour. Transfer everything to a saucepan (ideally your pan will have a non-stick surface). Be sure to include all excess liquid that accumulated at the bottom of the bowl. Heat the blueberry mixture to boiling then reduce heat a bit and simmer 8 to 10 minutes, stirring often to prevent sticking. The mixture will thicken and darken, as shown in the photo at right.

Remove from heat and serve immediately over pancakes, ice cream, slices of angel food or pound cake. To store, allow to come to room temperature then pour into an airtight container and keep in the refrigerator.



Pumpkin Pancakes with warm
Butter Pecan Syrup



May you eat (and read) with joy!


~ Cleo Coyle

New York Times bestselling author of  
The Coffeehouse Mysteries


Friend me on facebook here. * Follow me on twitter here
Learn about my books here

* * *

Now a Bestselling Hardcover!


Coffee. It can get a girl killed.

Amazon * B&N




A Mystery Guild Selection
A Baker & Taylor Fall "Trends" Pick
Three "Best of Year" Lists


Dead to the Last Drop 
is a culinary mystery with 
more than 25 delicious recipes!

See the free illustrated 
Recipe Guide by clicking here.

*  *  *



The Coffeehouse Mysteries are bestselling works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark Greenwich Village coffeehouse, and each of the 15 titles includes the added bonus of recipes. 




GET A FREE TITLE CHECKLIST
OF BOOKS IN ORDER
(with mini plot summaries)

* * * 

Marc and I also write
The Haunted Bookshop Mysteries

Get a free title checklist, 
with mini plot summaries, 



Or learn more about the books and meet
Jack Shepard, 
our PI ghost by clicking here.



The Coffeehouse Mystery Newsletter
Fun Contests, New Recipes, 
Book News, Videos, and more...

To subscribe, click here.



Tuesday, January 27, 2015

The Secret to Perfect Oatmeal Pancakes with #DairyFree Version by author Cleo Coyle


We're hunkered down here in New York City, along with millions more of you along the east coast, as the "Snowmaggedon" blizzard blows. How does it look outside your window? 

Here in Queens, the storm's intensity has been on and off, and last evening we had a whiteout rush hour. I snapped the photo below at a busy intersection about a block from our home.


(Photo by Cleo Coyle)

A fun, little FYI...
A local New York television station featured my
news-weather photo above. (An OMG moment.)
To see the video clip, click here and visit my
facebook page (please feel free to friend me).

With a day of snow-shoveling ahead of us, Marc and I are happy to start the morning with a stack of warm, fluffy oatmeal pancakes. As a whole grain, oatmeal brings great nutrition and fiber to this lovely stack of cakes, along with a hearty, slightly nutty, and absolutely delicious flavor. But beware...

Not all oatmeal pancake recipes are created equal, and I've tried enough of them to know. The one below is my own recipe, and it has a few tricks to give you great results (that is, tender and fluffy flapjacks instead of rubbery disks). 

I've also included a dairy-free variation for my friends out there who aren't able to consume dairy products. And I promise you, the dairy-free version is every bit as good as the standard, dairy version.

Now let's get cookin'...



Cleo Coyle has a partner in 
crime-writing—her husband.
Learn about their books
by clicking here or here.


Cleo Coyle’s
Oatmeal Pancakes 


A diner near my home in Queens serves fantastic oatmeal pancakes. While they didn't give me their recipe, they did mention soaking their oats in milk, and (after some experimenting), I knew this was the secret to getting great results. 

True, other recipes out there instruct you to simply mix the batter and cook (or even use a food processor, which will grind the oats and over-work the batter), but I knew what I wanted in an oatmeal pancake, and those recipes didn't produce it for me. 

Since I knew what was possible, given the diner's delicious cakes, I set to work playing with my own version of the recipe until I created something very close. Follow the steps and you should have the same results. I sincerely hope so, then we can all...eat with joy!

~ Cleo, author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries




http://www.coffeehousemystery.com/userfiles/file/Oatmeal-Pancakes-Cleo-Coyle.pdf
Click here for free
recipe PDF.

To download this recipe in a free PDF document that you can print, save, or share, click here




Makes about 6 pancakes 
(4- to 5-inches in diameter)

Ingredients:


1/2 cup quick-cooking oats (not instant)
3/4 cup whole or 2% cow's milk
      (*or dairy-free milk) mixed with…
1 teaspoon lemon juice or white vinegar
1 Tablespoon honey (I love using local raw honey)
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt (or 1/8 tsp. table salt)
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 Tablespoons vegetable or canola oil (*see dairy-free note below)
1 large egg
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup + 2 Tablespoons flour (all-purpose white,
               or white whole wheat, or spelt flour)


Directions: Soak the oats in the milk (that you have already mixed with the lemon or vinegar) for about 15 minutes, no longer. You’re watching for the oats to plump up and the mixture to thicken (see my photo below). Whisk in all the other ingredients except the flour. Be sure the mixture is well blended. Now stir in the flour until it is completely incorporated, but do not over-mix. Allow this mixture to sit for 5 minutes. It will thicken up into a nice batter. Grease a non-stick pan or griddle with butter, oil, or coat with non-stick spray. Ladle on the batter, forming cakes of 4 to 5 inches in diameter. See cooking tip below.


*Dairy-free variation: Replace cow’s milk with almond milk (or another nut milk) or soy milk and because these milks are lower in fat than cow’s milk, increase the vegetable oil by 1 teaspoon.


After 15 minutes, the oats will plump up and
the mixture will thicken. Don't skip this step
because it's one secret to getting great results.

Local, raw honey is delicious in this batter.
You can also substitute white or brown sugar
in the same amount.

After the flour goes in, allow the batter
to sit for just five more minutes before cooking,
another secret to getting the best results.

Cooking tip: Oatmeal pancake batter cooks a little differently than standard pancake batter. Watch for the edges to appear cooked and crinkles to form across the cake surface with a few bubbles (you will not see as many bubbles as you would in a standard pancake). When you flip the cake should be golden brown. Cook until golden brown on the other side and serve warm.






http://www.coffeehousemystery.com/userfiles/file/Oatmeal-Pancakes-Cleo-Coyle.pdf
Click here for free
recipe PDF, and...




Stay cozy!

~ Cleo Coyle

New York Times bestselling author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries


Friend me on facebook here. * Follow me on twitter here
Learn about my books here



* * *

Now a Bestselling Hardcover!


Coffee. It can get a girl killed.

Amazon * B&N






A Mystery Guild Selection

A Baker & Taylor Fall "Trends" Pick

"This book is amazing to the last word!"
A Best Read of the Year! 
~ Dollycas


Dead to the Last Drop 
is a culinary mystery with 
more than 25 delicious recipes!

See the free illustrated 
Recipe Guide by clicking here.


* * * 



The Coffeehouse Mysteries are bestselling
works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark
Greenwich Village coffeehouse, and each of the
15 titles includes the added bonus of recipes.


GET A FREE TITLE CHECKLIST
(with mini plot summaries)


* * * 


Marc and I also write
The Haunted Bookshop Mysteries

Get a free title checklist, 
with mini plot summaries, 



Or learn more about the 
books and meet Jack Shepard, 
our PI ghost by clicking here.




The Coffeehouse Mystery Newsletter

Fun Contests, New Recipes, 
Book News, Videos, and more...

To subscribe, click here.


* * *