Showing posts with label haddock. Show all posts
Showing posts with label haddock. Show all posts

Friday, October 13, 2017

Almost No Apple

(Otherwise known as Haddock in Cider)

All right, enough with the curry and the apples. Except, well, I’m trying to wean myself from all things apple, in case I ever run out, and this is sort of a step in that direction. No, there are no apples in this recipe, but there is hard cider. One step at a time.

Haddock seems to be plentiful this year for some reason, so we’ve been eating a lot of it—fresh and local, never frozen. So I had haddock on hand, and, wonder of wonders, I also had cider (left over from a recent visit from relatives). The rest was easy! this is a quick and simple recipe that combines some interesting flavors.

Oh, and it’s adapted from an Irish cookbook. I’m getting palate in training for my next trip to West Cork, just over a month away.


HADDOCK IN CIDER 

Ingredients


2 Tblsp flour
salt and freshly ground pepper
4 haddock (or similar firm white fish) fillets

2 Tblsp minced shallots
Sprigs of fresh thyme

4 slices lemon
1-1/4 cups (hard) cider
1 Tblsp unsalted butter



Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter an ovenproof baking dish.

In a shallow bowl (or pie pan), combine the flour, salt and pepper. Dip the fish fillets in the mix and place in the buttered dish.



Sprinkle with the shallots and thyme. 



Place the lemon slices on top, then pour the cider over the fish and dot with butter.

Cover the pan with foil and bake for 20-25 minutes (depending on the thickness of your fillets), or until the fish is flaky.



Remove the pan from the oven and preheat the broiler. Remove the foil from the pan and place the dish under the broiler for 1-2 minutes, or until the fish is lightly browned. 


Serve with rice or noodles.

Just to change things up a little, here's an early sketch of what became the cover for A Late Frost. It's fun to see the process!

A Late Frost will be released on November 7th.

Available now for preorder from Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

And if you happen to be at the mystery conference Boucheron in Toronto, grab me and say hello!

www.sheilaconnolly.com

Friday, February 17, 2017

Celery Root Remoulade

Do you watched the show Chopped on the Food Network? That’s the one where four contestants are handed mystery baskets of food items and told to make something yummy in twenty minutes. The results are judged by a panel of food critics and restauranteurs. In case you’re wondering where the hook is, the ingredients can by as weird and wonderful as marshmallows, pickles, frogs legs and peanut butter—and all of them must be used in the same dish. It’s cruel fun to watch the contestant cooks panic, but I must say I get a lot of ideas there.

I hold my own Chopped challenge at home. It’s been snowing around here a lot lately (oh, look, there it goes again), and I really don’t want to go to the local store because I don’t happen to have a lemon or six eggs. So I challenge myself: what can I make using only ingredients in my fridge, freezer or pantry?

What do I have now? Frozen mussels and leftover Thanksgiving turkey. A pair of quinces. A celery root. Some parsnips. A number of spices I can’t even identify, and at least a dozen kinds of salt. All the staples, of course—sugar, flour, butter, eggs, milk. Six kinds of rice, and as many kinds of pasta. Surely there’s a dish waiting to be made somewhere in there?

This is a celery root. Ugly, isn't it?
But somebody tried really hard to make
it sound appealing

Celery root seems to be the prime candidate—you know, that gnarly thing that stays underground while that cluster of nice green stalks rises above it. However, I wanted to skip the obvious choices like puree of celery root, or celery root soup, or celery root gratin, some of which involve combining the celery root with potatoes or even apples. Trolling through Epicurious, I came upon an old recipe from Gourmet magazine that involved celery root and sea scallops. Sorry no scallops, I don’t have any scallops on hand. But I do have a nice filet of fresh (never-frozen) American-caught haddock, which is a sturdy white fish. Bingo. Swap in the haddock for the scallops, and the celeriac goes into a pungent remoulade sauce—for which I actually have all the ingredients!

Haddock with Celery Root Remoulade

Remoulade Sauce:

1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup finely chopped sweet red pepper
1/2 cup finely chopped yellow pepper
1 Tblsp capers, drained and chopped
1 Tblsp Dijon mustard
1 Tblsp chopped shallot
1 Tblsp fresh tarragon, chopped
1-1/2 Tblsp fresh lemon juice
Salt and pepper to taste

1-lb celery root (aka celeriac)

Fish filets
Olive oil for sautéeing


Instructions:

Chop whatever needs chopping;



Mix together the sauce ingredients and season with salt and pepper. (The sauce can be made ahead and kept chilled.)

Sorry, it's still ugly

Peel the celery root (they’re lumpy critters!) and cut into matchsticks (okay, get real—I am not going to slice this thing into 1/8-inch sticks—I’ll settle for maybe 1/4-inch thickness). Add to the sauce and toss (taste for seasoning again and add salt and pepper if needed).



Season the fish lightly with salt and pepper. Heat the olive oil in a skillet and saute the fish filet(s) until they’re cooked through. (I’ll admit, haddock seems to flake apart when you’re cooking it, so it doesn’t look very tidy.)



Serve on a plate with a mound of the remoulade alongside, and some kind of starch—I used pearl or Israeli couscous. Oops, everything on the plate seems to be white. Blame it on the snow.





As you can guess from the cover and the title, Cruel Winter takes place during a snowstorm. Don't worry--snow doesn't hang around in Ireland for very long. In this case, it's just long enough to solve an old murder. Maybe.

Coming March 14. You can pre-order it at Amazon and Barnes and Noble. And after March 14 I hope you can find it everywhere!

www.sheilaconnolly.com