Showing posts with label bread pudding. Show all posts
Showing posts with label bread pudding. Show all posts

Sunday, February 7, 2016

Dessert for Breakfast by Victoria Hamilton




A very warm welcome to Amanda Cooper, author of the Teapot Collector mystery series! You might know Amanda for something else, though. Yes, she does write cozy mysteries as Victoria Hamilton. But that's not it.

Amanda is one of the queens of cozy giveaways. In fact, today she has not one, but two special giveaways. Don't forget to enter!

 



Random Observation #1:
I have a raging sweet tooth. Seriously. I have to be strict with myself, or I’d be eating cookies for breakfast, brownies for lunch, and French Toast for dinner. But then, who doesn’t like breakfast for dinner?

Random Observation #2:
Recently I was reminiscing how much my mom LOVED bread pudding. Even in her mid eighties she’d make it for herself often. I suddenly thought, well, it takes bread, eggs and milk… isn’t that really French Toast in a casserole? And… if you ate it in the morning that would just be… dessert for breakfast? Or a breakfast dessert?

Random Observation #3
I occasionally buy raisin bread and Cinnabon bread, but I don’t eat a lot of bread these days, so I inevitably end up throwing half loaves in the freezer. Where they sit. Sometimes I’ll make French Toast out of them, but not often.

These random thoughts come together in today’s recipe. I have dragged out my bits of raisin and Cinnabon bread loaves, whipped up the other ingredients, and voila, dessert (bread pudding) for breakfast. Though it doesn’t need it, I’ve made a sugar free berry sauce to pour over it, just as if it was French Toast, using my Christmas gift, an immersion blender! If you don’t have one, you can use a blender or just leave the berry sauce chunky. The beauty of this recipe is, it’s readily scalable for however many folks you’re feeding, or however many ramekins you have!

Individual Bread Puddings
Yield: 2 Servings
Ingredients:
2 cups day-old bread cubes, preferably raisin bread, Cinnabon Bread, etc.
*I actually used four slices, 2 of Cinnabon bread and 2 Weight Watchers’ Raisin bread, and it was a little too much for 2 - 12 oz. ramekins. It would easily have made 3 servings.
2 eggs
1 cup milk
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions:
1 - Divide bread between two greased 12 oz. oven safe ramekins and set aside.
2 - Beat eggs, milk, sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg, then pour equal amounts into each ramekin. Let the milk/egg mixture soak in for a few mintues.
3 - Bake uncovered, at 350° for 40-50 minutes or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool slightly.
4 – Serve warm with Sugarfree Fruit Sauce (recipe follows), custard sauce, whipped topping or on its own.

Sugar Free Fruit Sauce

Ingredients:
2 Cups Frozen Berries – I like Europe’s Best, which I use for my smoothies, as well.
2 Cups Water
2 tsp. lemon juice

Directions:
1 – Put berries and water in pan and turn to medium/low.
2 – Simmer until the berries break down, about 20 minutes, depending on the size of the berries, then using your immersion blender (or cool the mixture and use a blender, if you prefer) blend until the consistency you prefer. Simmer blended mix longer to reduce and thicken.
3 – Sweeten to your taste after you’re done cooking, if you’re using Stevia. If you’re using sugar, you must cook it with the berries. Don’t use too much Stevia because it is a powerful sweetener!
4 – Pour the fruit sauce into a glass jar once it’s cooled enough. Keep it in the fridge, but not for too long; this is not jam and will go bad. I would suggest it will keep for a few days.

  
Sauce Ingredients
Fruit Sauce

Bread Pudding Ingredients

Bread Pudding for Breakfast!


Giveaway!

You could win one of two fun prize packages:

First Prize: Vintage teacup and saucer, Auntie Rose’s Tea-rrific Tea blend, a signed copy of The Grim Steeper, bookmark and a Cozy Mystery book tote!



Second Prize: A signed copy of The Grim Steeper, tea, and a bookmark.




Open to US and Canadian addresses.

Leave a comment, with some form of your name and email address so we can contact the winner! Contest ends at 11:55 PM on Wednesday, February 10th, so don't delay.


~::~

About The Grim Steeper:
The national bestselling author of Shadow of a Spout invites readers back to the Finger Lakes town of Gracious Grove for more tea and murder...

Mid-October in the charming Finger Lakes town of Gracious Grove means it’s time for the annual Fall Fling Townwide Tea Party. The highlight of the festivities is a roaming tea-tasting, which includes a stop at Auntie Rose’s Victorian Tea House. Sophie Taylor would like to share her enjoyment of the event with her sort-of boyfriend, English teacher Jason Murphy, but Jason’s dean has accused him of falsifying grades to help an athlete at the local college. Steamed and stressed, Jason shows up the night of the party with bags under his eyes.

But the dean shows up under Sophie’s Japanese Maple later that night, murdered, and now Jason is suspected of far worse than fudging grade reports. It’s up to Sophie, her Nana, and their friends the Silver Spouts to pore over the clues to find out who really decided to teach the dean a lesson.



Social Media Links:
Amanda Cooper/Victoria Hamilton Mysteries: http://www.victoriahamiltonmysteries.com
Amanda Cooper/Victoria Hamilton Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorVictoriaHamilton
Twitter: https://twitter.com/MysteryVictoria - or - @MysteryVictoria




Monday, April 27, 2015

Krista's Double Chocolate Bourbon Bread Pudding


I hate bread pudding. Seriously. It's just one of those desserts that I rarely like. I will confess to gobbling it up when a friend insisted we try a special bread pudding at the Hard Rock Cafe. It was fabulous. But most of the time - meh.

So it was very odd when I was overcome by the notion of making a chocolate bread pudding recipe for THE DIVA STEALS A CHOCOLATE KISS. I have no idea what possessed me. But I did it. And it was so good that I worried that it wasn't a real bread pudding!

Consequently, I enlisted the aid of two friends who love bread pudding. I set it before them and asked - is this bread pudding? Pretty pathetic, huh? They confirmed that not only was it great but that it was bread pudding. So if you happen to have people in your life who love chocolate but aren't enthusiastic about bread pudding, this recipe might change their minds.

You can serve it with whipped cream, but honestly, it's so addictive that it's very tasty plain.


Krista's Double Chocolate Bourbon Bread Pudding

9x13 baking dish
butter for greasing

1 loaf Challah

1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder (I used Penzeys)
1 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup heavy cream
3 1/2 cups milk (can use nonfat)
4 large eggs
4 tablespoons bourbon (1 airline size bottle)

1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips (I used Callebaut)

1. Tear the Challah into pieces and place in a large bowl.

2. Combine the cocoa powder, sugar, and salt and whisk together. Stir in the heavy cream and the  milk. In another bowl, lightly whisk the eggs. Whisk them into the milk mixture. Add the bourbon, give a final stir with the whisk and pour 1/2 of it over the bread. Turn the bread until it is all coated. Set aside for 30 minutes.

3. Preheat the oven to 350 and grease the pan. Pour the bread into the pan along with any liquid. Spread the bread in the pan. Scatter the chocolate chips over the bread. Pour the remaining milk mixture over top and bake for 20 minutes.

4. Turn the heat down to 275 and bake another 10 minutes or until the middle is firm and a cake tester comes out clean.


Tear up one loaf of Challah.

Sprinkle with chocolate chips.



Friday, December 13, 2013

Black and White Bread Pudding

by Sheila Connolly


These days I consistently embarrass my husband when we eat out by taking pictures of my meals.  Luckily cameras and cellphones are sensitive enough that flash is rarely necessary, because that would be even tackier.  But there are definitely dishes that I want to remember—and try to recreate.

On this most recent trip to Ireland we went back to a place where we’d eaten last year.  It’s called The Mills Inn in Ballyvourney, County Cork—the town of Ballyvourney is in one of the Gaeltachts, where only Irish is spoken within the community (they do speak English to outsiders who pass through), with a nice package of tax breaks for living there.  I went back to the restaurant because I was blown away by their filo-wrapped prawns last year (yes, I took a picture then), and I had them again this year.  As good as I remembered.
But this year I tried a dessert that really stood out:  a chocolate bread pudding.  Part of that was because it was nicely presented, with multiple sauces on the plate, each in its own container.  Part of it was because it simply tasted good.

I know, I gave you a classic American bread pudding not that long ago.  But this was different, and more interesting (and would impress guests more!).

Now, if you go online looking for chocolate bread pudding, you usually find some intense all-chocolate recipes, maybe with chocolate chips sprinkled in.  This one was smart:  layers of white and chocolate cake, in a standard egg/sugar/milk custardy mix. Aha, I said:  a relatively quick and easy dish, and a great way to use up stale cake.  What, you have no leftover cake?  Get ye to the market and buy a pound cake, fresh or frozen.  You need pound cake or a similarly dense cake so it will stand up to the eggy mix—regular cake will turn to mush.  In fact, slice it (if it isn’t already) and let it sit around uncovered and get just a bit stale.

I had more trouble finding chocolate pound cake.  Actually, I never did find it in a store, so I made one.  But this is something you can make well ahead of time and freeze, then whip it out when company’s coming and assemble the dish at the last moment.

The Mills presented this dish with the options of whipped cream, custard, and ice cream on the side.  Any of those is good, but I thought a dash of color and tartness might jazz it up just a bit, so I offer a puree of sweetened fresh raspberries.  You can pick and choose as you like.

If I may make some edits to my own recipe, next time I would make the slices of the cakes thinner, so there would be more layers.  I do have to point out that judging the volume of cake slices is not exactly easy, but this dish is forgiving:  if your top layer is left high and dry, just add more milk until the top slices are almost covered.  You won’t need to adjust the amount of the egg mixture because it distributes itself surprisingly well throughout.

Black and White Bread Pudding from The Mills Inn at Ballyvourney

3-1/2 cups stale cake or bread, half golden, half chocolate

3 cups warm whole milk (add more if needed)

1/4 tsp salt


4 egg yolks

3/4 cup sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2 Tblsp butter                                 

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.


Arrange the cake pieces in a baking dish and soak them in the milk.

Mix the other ingredients together and beat well.  Pour them over the soaked bread in the baking dish and stir lightly to blend.
Dot the top with small pieces of butter. Set the baking dish in a pan of hot water (the water should come about halfway up the sides) and cook for about 45-60 minutes, or until the top layer is crisp and lightly browned.
Serve with sauces of your choice or whipped cream on the side.

Hmm, must practice my sauce presentations...



Coming February 2014

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Spiced Apple and Brown Sugar Spoonbread: An Easy Bread Pudding by Cleo Coyle #apples





The earliest published version of spoonbread dates back to the Carolina Housewife cookbook by Sarah Rutledge, 1847.

To make Sarah's version, you take...

"One pint of corn flour; boil half to a mush; add, when nearly cold, two eggs, a table-spoonful of butter and a gill* of milk, and then the remaining half of flour. Bake on a griddle, or grease a pan and drop in spoonfuls."

*A gill equals 1/2 cup. (And, yes, I had to look it up.)

So there you are. You can try Sarah's recipe or give mine a go. This Spiced Apple and Brown Sugar Spoonbread has layers of harvest flavor added to make a lovely, warm breakfast bread pudding for apple season. 



With our own New York apples in the markets now (or a short drive away to pick-your-own orchards), this is not only a great time for apple dishes, but also apple mysteries...

Warm congrats to my fellow crime-writing cook, Sheila Connolly, on the release of her new Orchard Mystery Golden Malicious.

May you eat (and read) with joy! 


~ Cleo





Cleo Coyle, author of The
Coffeehouse Mysteries
, has
a partner in crime-writing--
her husband, Marc.
Cleo Coyle's
Spiced Apple
and Brown Sugar
Spoonbread


An Easy Bread Pudding


Spoonbread is said to have its roots in a Native American dish called subpawn, a type of cornmeal porridge. English colonists added eggs and milk to enrich the dish, and (as I mentioned above) the first published version appeared in 1847. 

I built on the classic recipe, adding harvest flavors to create an easy, tasty breakfast bread pudding, perfect for chilly fall mornings. Serve it plain or with a drizzle of maple syrup for a tasty alternative to pancakes or waffles. And don't forget that fresh, hot pot of coffee to warm your bones while you're waiting to eat with joy... ~ Cleo


To download my recipe in a free PDF document that you can print, save, or share click here.

This recipe is perfect for a 1-1/2 quart casserole dish. In a pinch, however, you can use an 8-inch square baking pan. Whatever you use, be sure it is well greased with butter or cooking spray to prevent sticking. For a larger batch, double the amount of ingredients and use a 2-1/2 quart casserole dish or a 9 x 9 x 2-inch pan. Cooking time may be a bit longer for a larger casserole, check for doneness as indicated in the recipe.

Ingredients:

1 large ripe apple (or 2 small), peeled and shredded
using a boxed grater (or food processor)
(about 1-1/4 cups shredded apple)

3 tablespoons melted butter

2 tablespoons white, granulated sugar

¼ cup (packed) light brown sugar

1 teaspoon apple pie spice

¼ teaspoon salt

1-1/2 cups milk whole or low fat (1% or 2%, not skim)

½ cup apple juice (or apple cider)

¾ cup cornmeal (yellow or white)

(optional) ½ cup raisins or craisins (sweetened dried cranberries)

2 eggs

2 teaspoons baking powder

Directions: First preheat your oven to 350° F. Into a medium size saucepan, place the shredded apples and butter, warm over medium heat, stirring while butter melts. Add the white and brown sugars, apple pie spice, and salt and stir to blend the flavors. Add the milk, apple juice, 3/4 cup of cornmeal, and (optional) raisins or craisins (or a combination of the two). Cook and stir this mixture over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes, until mixture thickens and resembles porridge.

IMPORTANT: Remove from heat and allow the mixture to cool off for at least ten minutes before whisking in the eggs and baking powder. Transfer immediately to a well-greased 1-1/2 quart casserole dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes (depending on oven). When spoonbread is set on top (no longer liquid and jiggling) and slightly browned, it’s finished cooking. As the name implies, spoon the bread pudding onto plates right from the baking dish. You can eat it plain or drizzle pure maple syrup on it for an amazing breakfast.


Foodie
P h o t o s 



Eat (and read) with joy! 
~ Cleo Coyle

New York Times bestselling author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries

Yes, this is me, Cleo (aka Alice). 
Friend me on facebook here.
Follow me on twitter here
Visit my online coffeehouse here.







To view the
Coffeehouse Mystery
book trailer, click here.
 







A Brew to a Kill

The bestseller in hardcover is
now a bestseller in paperback.

"A foodie's delight...And a
satisfyingly rich mystery."
~ Kirkus Reviews


The Coffeehouse Mysteries are bestselling
works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark
Greenwich Village coffeehouse, and each of the
12 titles includes the added bonus of recipes. 

Friday, May 17, 2013

Bread Pudding

by Sheila Connolly

I love traveling (except for the getting there and back again—where's a transporter when you need one?), and I love trying new things.  This month I've been through Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, Pittsburgh and points between, and I came upon some great food, either because someone pointed me toward it or I stumbled on it by happy accident.

The concierge at my small hotel in Philadelphia suggested Talula's Garden around the corner, where I ordered a dish I won't even try to describe, much less make at home.  What I can say is that it was memorable because it contained a wonderful range of ingredients, and each bite tasted slightly different. (You can see the menu here.)

In a small town in New Jersey, where I was staying with a friend, I wandered into a restaurant called Sweet Lula's.  I went in because it was the first place I came to, and I was starving after a long day of driving across Pennsylvania.  Once inside I ordered from their ambitious menu and nearly dropped my fork at my first bite of their Roast Cod with Sage Brown Butter, it was that good. With grilled endive on the side—you can bet I'll try that this summer (I think the trick is to halve it and soak it in salted water so it doesn't cook too quickly on the grill).

Dessert there was bread pudding, and that's what I want to talk about here.  I seem to remember eating bread pudding most of my life, but when I went to look up recipes in my trusty cookbook collection (both old and new books), most of the recipes I found called for dry bread crumbs, and all I could think of was mush.  Lula's pudding was made with thick slices of bread.  Luckily I returned from my East Coast odyssey with a loaf of homemade apple cinnamon raisin bread, which worked just fine (and the slices fit very neatly in a 9-inch square pan).

This recipe is kind of a hybrid of French toast and custard, and it's easy to make.


OLD FASHIONED BREAD PUDDING

Preheat the oven on 350 degrees F.  Butter a 9" square baking pan (this works for slices of bread—if you want to tear up the pieces you can use any pan you like).



Lay the bread slices in the pan. This took eight slices.  If you're using pieces, that's about four cups. If you want to add raisins or even a dried fruit like cranberries, now is the time.

Mix together:


2 eggs
2 cups milk (I used half milk, half cream)
½ cup white sugar
Nutmeg or cinnamon if you like

Beat the eggs, then add the milk, sugar and spice(s).  Pour the liquid over the bread and let it stand until the bread pieces are soaked through (a few minutes).



Bake for 20-30 minutes until the top is golden.  I added caster sugar to the top before baking, for a little crunch.



You can serve this with whipped cream, ice cream or a sauce (Lula's offered whisky caramel sauce!)  It also kept surprisingly well for a day or two.





Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Spoonbread Recipes for Thanksgiving: Sweet Corn and Candied Yam by Cleo Coyle


Holiday Buzz
Click here to
learn more.
First a quick giveaway note! Another signed ARC (advanced reading copy) of Holiday Buzz is up for grabs. More info at the end of this post.

If you have roots in the South or enjoy soul food, I don’t have to describe spoonbread to you. For everyone else, I’m happy to explain.

I didn’t discover spoonbread until I moved to New York City. An acquaintance who grew up in Louisiana first mentioned the dish to me. 

"What is spoonbread?" I asked her. 

"It's a kind of cornmeal casserole that’s baked," she replied. "I know it sounds odd." 

I laughed and told her it didn't sound odd at all because I’d grown up on the Italian version: polenta.

Cleo Coyle, cornmeal eater,
is author of The
Coffeehouse Mysteries
Now I realize polenta is not a traditional Thanksgiving food, but...it was at our house, along with gnocchi, wedding soup, and other favorite dishes that were served each year by my Italian-born mom and aunt, right alongside the turkey, stuffing, and pumpkin pie. And so the US melting pot continues with new immigrants serving their own culture’s favorites along with those enjoyed by us native Americans. Hmm...sounds suspiciously like the first Thanksgiving...



Which leads me right back to spoonbread because its roots are in a native American dish called subpawn, a type of cornmeal porridge. Apparently, English colonists were the ones who added eggs and milk, making the dish richer. 

Basic spoonbread, however, is pretty bland. Like grits or mashed potatoes, plain old cornmeal spoonbread gets its flavor boost from a generous pour of gravy or maple syrup (depending on whether you'd like it savory or sweet). 

Taking more liberties than the English colonists, I adapted the basic recipe even further, layering flavors into the spoonbread itself so it can be eaten as a delicious dish without adding gravy or syrup. 

For example, the Sweet Corn & Cheddar Spoonbread is a tasty side dish for a roasted meat dinner. And the Candied Yam (Sweet Potato) Spoonbread gives a sweet spin to the traditional turkey day casserole. Let's start with...





Cleo's Sweet Corn
& Cheddar Spoonbread


(A Tasty Corn Casserole)

This recipe is perfect for a 1-1/2 quart casserole dish. In a pinch, however, you can use an 8-inch square pan. Whatever you use, be sure it is well greased with butter or cooking spray to prevent sticking. For a larger batch, double the amount of ingredients and use a 2-1/2 quart casserole dish or a 9 x 9 x 2-inch pan. Cooking time may be a bit longer for a larger casserole, check for doneness as indicated in the recipe.

Ingredients:

2 cups sweet corn kernels (I use frozen, no need to thaw)
4 tablespoons melted butter
1 tablespoon white, granulated sugar
1 teaspoon regular table salt or finely ground sea salt
1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper (white will look better, but you
      may substitute ground black pepper)
Pinch of cayenne pepper 
1-1/2 cups milk whole or low fat (1% or 2%, not skim)
½ cup water
¾ cup cornmeal (yellow or white)
2 eggs
2 cups shredded mild cheddar cheese, yellow or white (*See my end note on reheating)
2 teaspoons baking powder

(Optional flavor additions: ¼ cup crumbled bacon; ¼ cup chopped roasted red and/or green peppers; ¼ cup finely chopped, lightly grilled sweet onions**)

Directions: First preheat your oven to 350° F. Into a medium size saucepan, place the corn kernels (still frozen is fine) and butter, warm over medium heat, stirring while butter melts. Add the sugar, salt, white pepper, cayenne pepper and stir to blend the flavors. Add the milk, water, and 3/4 cup of cornmeal. Cook and stir this mixture over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes, until mixture thickens and resembles porridge. 

IMPORTANT: Remove from heat and allow the mixture to cool off for at least ten minutes before whisking in the eggs, cheese, and baking powder. Transfer immediately to a well-greased 1-1/2 quart casserole dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 40 to 50 minutes (depending on oven). When spoonbread is set on top (no longer liquid and jiggling) and slightly browned, it’s finished cooking. As the name implies, spoon the bread pudding onto plates right from the baking dish and…eat with joy!

*NOTE: When I reheat this casserole, I sprinkle extra shredded cheddar cheese over the top. It's delicious!

**If you’d like to add more vegetable flavors, such as chopped sweet onions and/or peppers, begin by sautéing them in the saucepan. Once they’ve cooked up, use the same pan to begin building the recipe, adding the corn, butter, milk, and so on.






* * * * * *


Next up is...




Cleo's Sweet Potato 
(Candied Yam) Spoonbread


This is absolutely delicious, like a cross between a pumpkin pie and a brown sugar coffee cake. I can't rave enough. If you like sweet potatoes, I think you'll flip for this.

If you don’t care for sweet potatoes, however, try substituting pumpkin puree or cooked and mashed winter squash (acorn or butternut). Although this recipe is perfect for a 1-1/2 quart casserole dish (or 8-inch square pan), you can easily double the amount of ingredients and use a 2-1/2 quart casserole dish or a 9 x 9 x 2-inch pan. Cooking time may be a bit longer for a larger casserole, check for doneness as indicated in the recipe and be sure to grease your pans well to prevent sticking.

Ingredients:

2 packed cups of cooked and mashed sweet potatoes, directions are given for cooking
   (You'll need 1-1/2 pounds of sweet potatoes, about 2 large or 3 small.)
4 tablespoons melted butter
1 cup dark brown sugar, packed
½ teaspoon salt
1-1/2 cups milk whole or low fat (1% or 2%, not skim)
½ cup apple juice (or apple cider)
¾ cup cornmeal (yellow or white)
2 eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 teaspoons baking powder

Directions: Peel your sweet potatoes, cut into quarters, place in a saucepan, cover with water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower heat to medium, cover with a lid, and cook 15 to 20 minutes or until very tender. Drain, mash, and measure out 2 cups. (*Or see Thanksgiving Day baked potato option at the end of this recipe.)

Preheat your oven to 350° F. 
Into a medium size saucepan, 
place the 2 cups of your cooked, mashed sweet potatoes and the butter. Warm both over medium heat, stirring while butter melts. Add the dark brown sugar and salt and stir to blend the flavors. Add the milk, apple juice, and 3/4 cup of cornmeal. Cook and stir this mixture over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes, until mixture thickens and resembles porridge.

IMPORTANT: Remove from heat and allow the mixture to cool off for at least ten minutes before whisking in the eggs, vanilla, and baking powder. Transfer immediately to a well-greased 1-1/2 quart casserole dish. Bake in the preheated oven for 45 to 55 minutes (depending on oven). When spoonbread is set on top (no longer liquid and jiggling) and slightly browned, it’s finished cooking. As the name implies, spoon the bread pudding onto plates right from the baking dish and…eat with joy!

*Thanksgiving Day option: While your turkey is roasting, prick sweet potatoes with fork and wrap in aluminum foil. If potatoes are extremely large, cut in two before wrapping. Bake about 90 minutes on a rack below or above the turkey. Remove potatoes from oven, scoop out and mash up the cooked potato flesh, and continue with the recipe. You can always slip the casserole into the oven on a rack above or below the turkey to cook along with it.





Cook with
Thanksgiving joy!






~ Cleo Coyle, author of 





Yes, this is me - Cleo Coyle
Learn about my books here.

Friend me on Facebook here.
Follow me on Twitter here.





To view the
Coffeehouse Mystery
book trailer, click here.






The Coffeehouse Mysteries are national bestselling
works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark
Greenwich Village 
coffeehouse, and each of the
12 titles includes the 
added bonus of recipes. 
 


**********************


Coming
December 4th!



Win a signed 
ARC of
Holiday Buzz!


Cozy Mystery Book Reviews is holding
the giveaway. Click here to jump there,
leave a comment there, and you'll be entered
to win it. The contest is open until
Tuesday, November 20th.


Happy Holidays, everyone,
and Happy Reading!

~ Cleo