Showing posts with label Shrimp Scampi. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Shrimp Scampi. Show all posts

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Shrimp Scampi recipe plus #bookgiveaway from Linda Wiken, author @LWiken


I love seafood. Born and raised on the West Coast and of Scandinavian heritage, it's not a surprise. I won't charm you with some of my favorites...ok, I'll just mention the pickled herring in white wine sauce in passing. Love, love, love anything to do with salmon, scallops, and shrimp.

So, I went to Shrimp Scampi for a birthday dinner I hosted a couple of weeks ago. I'd forgotten how easy this dish actually can be, once you get past the de-veining (if not already done) and I also like to remove the stomach, that black thread that resembles a vein only on the other side of the little suckers.

After that, it's a snap.

I actually tried a mish mash of recipes this time, adding some tasty fresh green onions and basil, along with a topping of Parmesan Padano cheese, grated on the spot. Also, I cut down on the amount of sale because I had only salted butter on hand while the recipe called for unsalted. It turned out really well but I also like it the previous plain way. So, your choice of what to do.

Here's what you'll need:

1 lb. large shrimp, peeled, deveined
 1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes
4 garlic cloves; 2 grated, 2 thinly sliced
2 tsp. chopped fresh basil
2 tsp. chopped fresh parsley
1 green onion, thinly sliced
1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1/4 c. white wine
1/4 c. butter
pinch of Kosher salt
3 tbsp. olive oil, divided
















Here's what to do:

1. In a medium bowl, whisk 1 tbsp. olive oil, grated garlic, and salt. Add prepared shrimp, tossing to thoroughly coat. Chill, uncovered, for up 30 to 60 minutes.

2. Heat remaining olive oil in a large skillet over medium and cook the shrimp, about 1 min. per side, until pink but slightly underdone. Use a slotted spoon and transfer to a plate.


3. To the remaining oil, add sliced garlic and red pepper, stirring for about 1 min.  Add wine and lemon juice, cooking for about 2 min. Add butter and cook until sauce thickened and butter is melted.

4. Add shrimp and any juices to the skillet and toss for about 2 min., until shrimp are fully cooked.

5. Transfer to a plate, top with basil, green onions, and parsley. Grate fresh cheese overtop.



6. Serve with rice or pasta and your favorite veggies. A fresh bread slice or roll is perfect for sopping up all the sauce.


Yay! It's Release Week for ROUX THE DAY, the second Dinner Club Mystery!
And, I'm celebrating with a book giveaway today. To be entered in the draw, leave a comment about your favorite seafood dish, and be sure to leave your email addy! A winner will be drawn on Friday midnight.   



ROUX THE DAY, A Dinner Club Mystery is now available in paper and as an e-book.


The first in the Dinner Club Mysteries is available at your favorite bookstore and on-line, as a paperback and as an e-book.  
Recipes included!



Writing as Erika Chase -- the Ashton Corners Book Club Mystery series are available on-line or at your favorite bookstore.

             
Visit Linda at www.lindakwiken.com
Love to hear from you at my Facebook author page and
on Twitter  @LWiken  
Also appearing at www.killercharacters.com
                                                                               


Visit Erika at www.erikachase.com 
 at my Facebook author page
and on Twitter  @erika_chase. 






Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Healthier Shrimp Scampi and a Fun Florida Film Festival by Cleo Coyle





You will not find "shrimp scampi" in a cookbook of authentic Italian dishes. This dish was born in America, and when you order it, you'll usually be served a gratin of large shrimp that have been split, brushed with an obscene amount of garlic butter and then broiled. 

Cleo Coyle, pasta eater,
is author of
The
Coffeehouse  Mysteries
Some restaurants like to serve it over pasta or rice. A famous chain of American seafood restaurants has long been known for its scampi. You can even get Red Lobster's copycat scampi recipe by clicking here.

My scampi recipe for you this week is not from any particular menu, it's simply my improvised, lighter version. The meal is satisfying yet healthy. Garlic, olive oil, fresh parsley, and seafood--all good stuff. You can make it even healthier by using a spinach, whole wheat, or low glycemic index pasta. When I make it, my husband inhales bowls of it, and I hope you enjoy it, too.


If you live in or near Sarasota, Florida, you may also enjoy this bit of news. The annual Sarasota Film Festival is underway this week and from now through Sunday, April 22nd, you can catch a wonderful presentation of films, many with the filmmakers and actors in attendance and ready to answer questions after the screenings.


A good buddy of mine, Scott Ciencin, is on the Festival staff and answered questions in the video below. Just click on the arrow to learn more, and if you see Scott at the festival, tell him Cleo Coyle says Hey! No kidding, don't be shy. Scott is one of the nicest guys in the whole wide world.

---------------



-------------------


Sarasota Film Festival official website - Click Here for more information, including the film schedule and tips from "The Insider," my friend Scott Ciencin.




 
Cleo Coyle's (Healthier)
Shrimp Scampi
with Angel Hair





To download a PDF of this recipe that you can print, save, or share, click here.


Servings: about 4
Ingredients:

20-24 Large Shrimp (fresh or frozen) 
16 ounces pasta (1 box is usually 16 oz or 1 pound) 
5 tablespoons olive oil 
6-8 cloves garlic, roughly chopped 
1 tablespoon butter 
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley (or 1/4 cup dried, but fresh tastes better!) 
1/4 cup Italian seasoned breadcrumbs 
1/2 teaspoon oregano

(Optional finishers) Freshly ground pepper; a quick squeeze of fresh lemon wedge or a bit of lemon zest grated over the top; sea salt; or freshly grated pecorino (read the comments after this post for the cheese on seafood question). 


Directions:

(1) First clean and peel your shrimp. If you are using frozen shrimp, defrost the shrimp first. Then make your pasta according to the package directions. I like angel hair but any pasta will work. To make this dish even more healthy, try spinach, whole wheat, or a specialty pasta with a low glycemic index. Drain well and set aside.

(2) Warm olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Throw in the chopped garlic cloves and saute for a minute or two. Toss in your shrimp. In 3 to 5 minutes, when they turn pink, stop the cooking. Do not overcook or shrimp will be tough and rubbery. Leave the oil in the pan but take out the shrimp and the garlic and set aside.

(3) Add the butter to the pan. When the butter melts, add your drained pasta, rolling around to coat well with the oil and butter. Toss in the Italian seasoned breadcrumbs, parsley, and oregano, and put your shrimp back into the pan to warm again.

(4) There is no need to add the chunks of garlic back in because by now the garlic has imparted its flavor to the oil. However, if you really like garlic (as we do), then throw it back in there, baby! Toss all ingredients together and serve.

Finish: Although there is much debate about whether to serve seafood pasta dishes with cheese (see the comments :)), I do enjoy grating pecorino over the top. Freshly ground pepper is also nice on this dish and/or a squeeze of lemon.





Eat with joy!

~ Cleo Coyle, author of




To get more of my recipes, enter to win
free coffee, or learn about my books, including
my bestselling 
Haunted Bookshop series, visit my online coffeehouse: CoffeehouseMystery.com



The Coffeehouse Mysteries are national bestselling
culinary mysteries set in a landmark Greenwich Village 
coffeehouse, and each of the ten titles includes the 
added bonus of recipes. 
 


The Ghost and
Mrs. McClure


Book #1 of 

The Haunted Bookshop
Mysteries
, which Cleo writes
under the name Alice Kimberly
To learn more, click here.

Sunday, October 2, 2011

Flat-Out Delicious


Kitchen-dwellers, I am delighted to introduce today's guest blogger, Jessica Park.  If you are not friends with Jessica on Facebook, do yourself a favor and start stalking her.  Honestly, reading Jessica's status updates is often the highlight of my (admittedly dull) days.  She's also a fantastic writer (see below) and an enthusiastic foodie.  So join me in welcoming Jessica to the kitchen!

~~~~~~

Hello, Mystery Lover’s Kitchen! I love coming here to visit and was so happy to get an invite from Wendy. Now that I’m not writing culinary mysteries, it’s hard to have an excuse to beg for a chance to guest blog, so Wendy saved me the humiliation! But, I’m still as food-obsessed as ever, and getting back into fall cooking after months of fresh summer salads and grilling. This is a dish that is now on the menu once a week, and I really can’t get enough of it. Obviously anything with bacon is always good, but the combination of bacon against the artichoke hearts, capers, and lemon is really awesome. Yes, I know. This dish sounds really strange, but I assure you that it’s delicious.


Fast, Easy, One-Pot, Scrumptious, Perfect-for-Weeknight-Suppers Shrimp Reminiscent of Scampi But Amped Up and Better

Serves two. Or so. I don’t really know. Depends how much you eat.

3 slices of bacon, chopped into ½” strips
1/3 cup good quality olive oil
2 T. butter
One big handful of cabbage, sliced into thin strips
1 ½ cups chicken broth
¼ cup canned tomato puree or a good handful of chopped fresh tomato
5 canned artichoke hearts, cut into quarters
2 T. capers
One big squeeze of lemon juice
2 springs of fresh thyme or 1 tsp. dried thyme
12 fresh or frozen shrimp, deveined and tails off (Do not skimp on the shrimp. Frozen can be absolutely fabulous, but avoid cheap brands where the shrimp are covered in frost. You get what you pay for.)
Salt and pepper to taste

Sautee the bacon over medium-high heat until just browned. Add the rest of the ingredients except for the shrimp, and cook at a medium simmer, stirring occasionally until the cabbage is wilted and tender without being soggy (about 15-20 minutes).  There should be a very nice amount of broth, so add more stock if you need it. Add in the shrimp and season, and then cook for a few minutes until the shrimp are no longer translucent, about 3-4 minutes. If you’ve used fresh thyme, pull the springs because no one needs to chew on little twigs.

Note: Good quality shrimp will release a wonderful flavor into this and limit how much you need to doctor the dish. If you need an extra kick, you can add a splash of white wine and/or a good sprinkle of Cajun seasoning.

Serve over polenta cakes:

If you feel like hanging out stirring a pot of polenta for ages, be my guest, but there is nothing wrong with these delicious rolls. Cylinders. Whatever they are. 


Slice into ½” thick patties (about 4 per person), dust with flour, and fry in a little olive oil over medium-low/medium heat until lightly brown and crispy on both sides. These take longer than you’d think, so plan on at least six minutes per side.

This dish would also be perfect over rice or pasta, of course, but I’m a polenta nut.

**********
Seriously awesome book!
My latest book, Flat-Out Love has nothing to do with food. Although the family in this novel does enjoy regular takeout…. But I hope that you food lovers will consider checking it out nonetheless. It’s a young adult book in many ways because the main characters are college students, but there is a much broader story about the complex family structure that truly makes this book accessible to readers of all ages. By some miracle, Flat-Out Love has spent the past five weeks as the #1 Top-Rated Romance on Amazon’s Kindle, and I’ve been amazed at what lovely reviews the book has been getting. It’s available for most e-readers and also in paperback from Amazon.

Flat-Out Love is a warm and witty novel of family love and dysfunction, deep heartache and raw vulnerability, with a bit of mystery and one whopping, knock-you-to-your-knees romance.

It's not what you know--or when you see--that matters. It's about a journey.

Something is seriously off in the Watkins home. And Julie Seagle, college freshman, small-town Ohio transplant, and the newest resident of this Boston house, is determined to get to the bottom of it. When Julie's off-campus housing falls through, her mother's old college roommate, Erin Watkins, invites her to move in. The parents, Erin and Roger, are welcoming, but emotionally distant and academically driven to eccentric extremes. The middle child, Matt, is an MIT tech geek with a sweet side ... and the social skills of a spool of USB cable. The youngest, Celeste, is a frighteningly bright but freakishly fastidious 13-year-old who hauls around a life-sized cardboard cutout of her oldest brother almost everywhere she goes.

And there's that oldest brother, Finn: funny, gorgeous, smart, sensitive, almost emotionally available. Geographically? Definitely unavailable. That's because Finn is traveling the world and surfacing only for random Facebook chats, e-mails, and status updates. Before long, through late-night exchanges of disembodied text, he begins to stir something tender and silly and maybe even a little bit sexy in Julie's suddenly lonesome soul.

To Julie, the emotionally scrambled members of the Watkins family add up to something that ... well ... doesn't quite add up. Not until she forces a buried secret to the surface, eliciting a dramatic confrontation that threatens to tear the fragile Watkins family apart, does she get her answer.

Flat-Out Love comes complete with emails, Facebook status updates, and instant messages.

Jessica Park
Facebook: jumby24
Twitter: JessicaPark24

Friday, January 29, 2010

Cleo Coyle’s (Healthier) Shrimp Scampi with Angel Hair


You will not find a recipe for "shrimp scampi" among the 1200+ pages of The Professional Chef, the cookbook of the CIA. (No, not the guys with black helicopters, the Culinary Institute of America.)

You will not find "shrimp scampi" in a cookbook of authentic Italian dishes, either. For one thing, "scampi" in Italian refers to Dublin Bay Prawns (the singular is scampo. So essentially the loose translation of "shrimp scampi" would be shrimp shrimp, which sounds even sillier than the oxymoron jumbo shrimp).

Like me, shrimp scampi was born in America; and on United States restaurant menus, ordering this dish usually means you'll be getting a gratin of large shrimp that have been split, brushed with plenty of butter & garlic and then broiled. Some restaurants like to serve it over pasta or rice. A famous chain of American seafood restaurants has long been known for its scampi. (You can even get Red Lobster's copycat scampi recipe by clicking here.)


My recipe below is not "authentic" shrimp scampi from any particular menu, it's simply my improvised, lighter version. The meal is satisfying yet healthy. Garlic, olive oil, fresh parsley, and seafood--all good stuff. You can make it even healthier by using a spinach, whole wheat, or low glycemic index pasta. When I make it, my husband inhales bowls of it, and I hope you enjoy it, too...

Cleo Coyle's (Healthier)
Shrimp Scampi with Angel Hair

Servings: about 4
Ingredients:

20-24 Large Shrimp (fresh or frozen)
16 ounces pasta (1 box is usually 16 oz or 1 pound)
5 tablespoons olive oil
6-8 cloves garlic (roughly chopped)
1 tablespoon butter
1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley (or 1/4 cup dried, but fresh tastes better!)
1/4 cup Italian Seasoned breadcrumbs (I use Progresso or 4C brand)
1/2 teaspoon oregano (dried is ok here)

(Optional finishers) Freshly ground pepper; a quick squeeze of fresh lemon wedge (or a bit of lemon zest grated over the top); sea salt; or freshly grated Pecorino Romano. Directions:

(1) First clean and peel your shrimp. (If using frozen, defrost first.) Then make your pasta according to the package directions. I like angel hair but any pasta will work. (To make this dish even more healthy, try spinach, whole wheat, or a specialty pasta with a low glycemic index.) Drain well and set aside.
(2) Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Throw in the chopped garlic cloves and saute for a minute or two. Toss in
your shrimp. When the little fellas begin to turn pink (3 to 5 minutes, do not overcook or shrimp will be tough and rubbery), stop the cooking. Leave the oil in the pan but take out the shrimp and the garlic and set aside.

(3) Add the butter to the pan. When the butter melts, add your drained pasta to the pan, rolling around to coat well with the oil and butter. Toss in the Italian seasoned breadcrumbs, parsley, and oregano, and put your shrimp back into the pan to warm again.

(4) There is no need to add the chunks of garlic back in because the garlic has already imparted its flavor to the oil. However, if you really like garlic (as we do), then throw it back in there, baby! Toss all ingredients together and serve! Finish: Although there is much debate about whether to serve seafood pasta dishes with cheese, I do enjoy grating some nice, salty Pecorino Romano over the top. Freshly ground pepper is also nice on this dish and/or a squeeze of lemon.






Eat with joy!

To get more of my recipes or to learn
about the books in my
Coffeehouse Mystery series,
visit my official Web site:
http://coffeehousemystery.com/



Till next time,
~ Cleo Coyle

author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries

www.CoffeehouseMystery.com



Comments welcome!