Showing posts with label Julia Child. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Julia Child. Show all posts

Friday, January 20, 2017

French Style Chicken

This past weekend my local paper’s magazine section had an article on how to cook chicken in various French-ish ways. I cook a lot of chicken, and I like French cooking, so I read on. [Please note that all parties shall remain nameless, because I disagreed with just about everything the author said.]

The author started out by claiming that a lot of cooks are still scared of exotic-sounding recipes, despite Julia Child’s eye-opening influence (which now dates back half a century! But I think they’re still the gold standard: she explains clearly and well, and the recipes work). The author claims that the dishes presented in the article are simple, if you know some basic techniques.

“Simple” is kind of a slippery idea. The author goes on to present recipes that are about as over-wrought as any contemporary ones that I’ve seen. We here at Mystery Lovers’ Kitchen love to give you new and interesting recipes from all sorts of sources, but we try to offer recipes that normal people can make. Maybe we take some shortcuts, but what we’re aiming for is tasty food that’s easy to put together.

This author missed the boat. Actual, the author lost me when author added sugar to the chicken. That was the first step in the recipe. Author then devoted ten lines to sautéeing boneless skinless chicken breasts. We do know how to do that, don’t we?

And so it went. Every step, every ingredient, was described to death, but not in a clear way. How the heck do you grate garlic (without grating your fingers)? What is a “strong simmer”? “Slightly reduced”? One instruction was to simmer something for 40 seconds. Do you keep a stopwatch by your stove?

Hey, it’s a recipe that sounds flavorful, so I gave it a shot anyway, translating it into normal cooking language—you know, “chop,” “mince,” “low heat,” “stir until thickened.” Instructions we can all understand. And it tasted just fine!


Sauteed Chicken French Style

The ingredients
The ingredients, chopped and measured
4 chicken breasts (note: you can use either boneless, skinless ones, which cook quickly, or bone-in, which I think taste better—just make sure they’re cooked through)

1 Tblsp vegetable oil
2 Tblsp butter
1/2 cup minced shallots
1 tsp fresh thyme
1 Tblsp minced garlic (about 4 cloves, depending on size)
1 Tblsp flour
3/4 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup chicken broth
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 tsp fresh lemon juice
3 Tblsp fresh parsley
Salt and pepper

In a large skillet heat the oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Sautee the chicken until lightly browned, turning once. Set aside.

Will someone please explain to me why when
you buy a package with two pieces, they're
never the same size?

Reduce the heat, add the butter and let it melt. Add the shallots, thyme and a half tsp of salt and cook over medium-low heat until the shallots are soft. 



Add the garlic and flour and cook for about a minute.



Add the wine, scrape the pan to gather up all those tasty bits that stuck to it, and whisk until there are no lumps. Cook for about a minute longer, until the sauce is thickened. Add the broth and stir.

Return the chicken and any juices from it to the pan, dunk both sides in the sauce, cover and cook until the chicken is done [yanno, you can use a meat thermometer, or you can poke it to see how springy it is, but chicken breasts vary so widely in size that there’s no single right cooking time. Just make sure it’s not pink in the middle.]. Remove the chicken to a serving platter and keep warm while you finish the sauce.


Add the cream to the sauce in the skillet, turn the heat up to medium-high and cook until the sauce thickens. Remove from the heat and add the lemon juice. Taste and add salt and pepper if you like. Stir in the parsley. 



Pour the sauce over the chicken pieces and serve with rice (or a carb of your choice). To quote the immortal and pragmatic Julia Child, “Bon appetit!”

Looks a bit messy but it tastes good!


Cruel Winter (County Cork #5), coming in less than two months!

You may have noticed that Maura Donovan doesn't cook. But her young barmaid Rose does, and when a group of people get snowed in overnight at Maura's pub, Sullivan's in Leap, Rose dusts off the old kitchen in the back and feeds the crowd!

(And yes, it snowed in County Cork this month. It happens!)

Available for pre-order at Amazon and Barnes & Noble

www.sheilaconnolly.com

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Why City Chicken has No Chicken: A New Look at a Century-Old Recipe by Cleo Coyle

Behold the "mock drumstick" of our (baked not fried)
City Chicken, smothered in a delicious pan gravy.
A century-old recipe bringing comfort food joy...


One hundred years ago, when you couldn't afford real chicken, "City Chicken" was a tasty alternative, a way to enjoy mock fried chicken drumsticks using meat scraps (pork, beef, veal) from the butcher. 

Different regions have their own take on this dish. Some deep fry the mock drumsticks, others have no breading. My 
husband's mother prepared it, "Pittsburgh style"breaded, sautéed, baked, and served with pan gravy, which is the very recipe I'm sharing with you today. 

Our longtime followers may recall my sharing this recipe a few years ago. I thought it would be fun to share again for our new followers and readers. AND since my husband (and partner in crime writing) has been craving it lately, I thought it was about time I aided and abetted his desire to...

Eat with joy!

~ Cleo



Cleo Coyle has a partner in 
crime writing—her husband. 
Learn about their books
by clicking here and here.
Cleo Coyle's
City Chicken


So why is it called City Chicken?

During the Depression, when this mock chicken dish really took off, fatty trimmings and meat scraps of pork, beef, and veal were less expensive than chicken, especially in urban areas that were far from poultry farms. In other words, city-dwellers were the ones making it because chicken was too expensive to eat.

And how does it taste?

Incredibly good. Marc and I grew up just outside of Pittsburgh, where the dish has been popular for years. Wednesdays were City Chicken night at my husband's house, where his mom served her hearty mock drumsticks with string beans and mashed potatoes—to soak up all that good pan gravy. 

For years, many of the grocery stores in the Pittsburgh area sold "City Chicken" packs of pork pieces with skewers included. Wikipedia's entry on City Chicken even features a picture of one of these Pittsburgh packs. (See Wiki photo at left.)

Here in New York, where we've lived for decades, we've never seen "City Chicken" packs—ironic since it's the biggest city in the country! But, hey, that's okay. Marc and I don’t need those packs. And neither do you. Just look for packages of boneless pork and/or veal pieces (usually marked for stew, see my pictures below), follow our recipe, and you’re all set to make your very own Pittsburgh-style comfort food.






To download a PDF copy 
of this retro recipe that
you can print, save, 
or share, click here.



Cleo Coyle's
City Chicken Recipe



Makes six servings
INGREDIENTS:

- 6 six-inch wooden skewers (in a pinch, simply cut down longer skewers)

- 3 pounds of meat cubes (we use):
    1-½ pounds boneless pork pieces (or "stew meat") +
    1-½ pounds veal pieces (or "stew meat")


- 1 cup all-purpose flour

- 1 cup seasoned bread 
crumbs (we use Italian seasoned)

- 2 large eggs (beaten with fork)

- 1 tablespoon milk (or water) to make the "egg wash" for breading

- 1 medium white or yellow onion, chopped 

- 1/4 cup vegetable oil 

- 2 Tablespoons butter 

- 2/3 cup chicken or veg stock

- Salt and pepper to taste

- 1 tablespoon (or so) Wondra flour or cornstarch


DIRECTIONS:

Note: If you bought "stew meat" packages as shown above, you should be ready to go. If you can't find stew meat, purchase pork loin chops and/or veal steaks and cut them into small pieces ( about 1- to 1-1/2 inches in size). 

Step 1: Prepare the Meat - Arrange the meat pieces on each of the six skewers. If using more than one type, alternate them (pork, veal, pork, veal, etc...) Fit the pieces together tightly to create a mock chicken drumstick. Dredge each of the mock drumsticks in flour, then in the egg wash (2 eggs beaten with 1 T. milk or water), and finally coat generously with the seasoned bread crumbs.




Step 2: Brown the meat – Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. While oven is heating, place the vegetable oil in a large oven-proof skillet over medium high heat. When this shallow oil is hot enough to ripple, add 1 tablespoon of butter and allow it to melt. Sauté the mock drumsticks about five minutes in the hot oil, turning often, until the outsides are golden brown. Remove the mock drumsticks from the pan and set them aside on a holding plate. Turn the heat to low.

Step 3: Sauté the onions – Add the chopped onion to the hot oil, along with about 1 tablespoon butter. Cook and stir over the low heat until the onions are brown, about five minutes. Now return the mock drumsticks to the pan (along with any drippings that may have accumulated on the holding plate). Cook them only for another minute or two.


Step 4: Bake in the oven – Add ½ cup chicken or vegetable stock to the skillet, cover with a lid, and bake in the preheated oven for about 50 minutes, or until the meat is tender. 




Step 5: Make the gravy - The onions and stock create a nice gravy as the meat cooks. While you can spoon this thin gravy over the mock drumsticks as is, we prefer to thicken it. To do this, you'll need to remove all of the mock drumsticks from the pan while leaving the liquid in there...



Over low heat, whisk the Wondra flour (or cornstarch) into the liquid. If you like, you can stir a bit of butter into the gravy for richness, as well, although it's not a necessity. Simmer for a minute or two, whisking in more flour or cornstarch until the gravy thickens to your liking. Then plate the mock drumsticks, spoon the gravy over them, as shown, and...





Eat (and read) with joy!

~ Cleo Coyle

New York Times bestselling author of  
The Coffeehouse Mysteries


Friend me on facebook here. * Follow me on twitter here
Learn about my books here


* * *


Our Newest Mystery is
a Bestselling Hardcover!



Coffee. It can get a girl killed.

Amazon * B&N




A "Most Wanted" Mystery Guild Selection
A Baker & Taylor Trends Pick
Three "Best of Year" Reviewer Lists


Dead to the Last Drop 
is a culinary mystery with 
more than 25 delicious recipes!

See the free illustrated 
Recipe Guide by clicking here.



*  *  *



The Coffeehouse Mysteries are bestselling
works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark
Greenwich Village coffeehouse, and each of the
15 titles includes the added bonus of recipes. 


GET A FREE TITLE CHECKLIST
OF BOOKS IN ORDER

(with mini plot summaries)


* * * 


Marc and I also write
The Haunted Bookshop Mysteries

Get a free title checklist, 
with mini plot summaries, 



Or learn more about the 
books and meet Jack Shepard, 
our PI ghost by clicking here.



Friday, September 4, 2015

My New Pan

by Sheila Connolly

Once upon a time, in a universe far far away… Oops, wrong story. When I got married in 1976 (I was a babe in arms, of course), a friend of mine gave me a Le Creuset enameled cast-iron Dutch oven. It became my go-to pan for everything (of course, at the time I didn’t have a lot of cookware). It was the perfect size for four servings. It distributed the heat beautifully. I loved that thing.

Over the years, it started getting a bit grungy. Those of you who follow us at Mystery Lovers’ Kitchen may have noticed that red pot whose white interior wasn’t exactly white any more. And there were a few chips around the edges. It was tired, even though I’d babied it for decades. But it still worked.

Then a friend told me something wonderful: Le Creuset has a life-time guarantee for its products. Lifetime. No questions asked (unless you drop it from a fifth-story window, maybe). No proof of purchase required. Send the old one to the factory, and they will send you a brand new one. I did.



It arrived on Monday. It is shiny and new. It is beautiful.

So I had to christen it. My first thought was to pull out the old faithful cookbook, Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking. My copy is one I bought for myself when I graduated from college and moved to my first apartment, so it was even older than the old pot. It still gets a lot of use.

I started leafing through the chicken section. I’d already shared my version of Julia’s Tarragon Chicken here, so that was out. Looking at the recipes was kind of a time-travel trip: there was a lot of butter and cream and wine involved, although at least Julia called for fresh herbs and shallots. But it’s still summer-ish here, so I wanted something not too heavy to inaugurate my lovely red pot. Here’s what I came up with (with honors to Julia Child but updated):


Poulet Sauté (okay, Sauteed Chicken)

I’ll give you the recipe for four, but since there are only myself and my husband (and a cat who likes chicken) at home, I’ll cook only for two.



3 pounds frying chicken, cut into pieces
Salt and pepper
2 Tblsp butter plus 1 Tblsp cooking oil

Place the casserole over medium high heat and melt the butter with the oil. Season the chicken pieces with salt and pepper. When the foam from the butter is all but gone, add the chicken pieces, skin side down, in one layer (do not overcrowd!). When the first side has turned a nice golden color (in 2-3 minutes), turn the pieces over to brown the other side. Do not let the fat overheat.



Fresh herbs (note: Julia was very conservative with the amount of herbs she suggested—I was much more liberal, especially since they came from my own pot of herbs)

2-3 Tblsp butter

If the fat in the pan is too dark, pour it out and add the fresh butter. Mix in the herbs, then place the chicken in the pan and baste it with the herbed butter. Cover the pan and lower the heat to medium. Baste and turn the chicken a few times, until it is done (10-15 min for white meat). Remove to a heated platter and cover while you finish the sauce.

1 Tblsp minced shallot or green onion
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/2 cup chicken broth (Julia said canned; I use what comes in a box these days, which is available in a low-sodium form)
1-2 Tblsp softened butter
Minced herbs if you want

Remove all but 2-3 Tblsp of the fat from the casserole. Add the shallots or onions and cook slowly for a minute. Pour in the wine and allow the alcohol in it to boil off. Add the chicken stock. Raise the heat and boil, scraping up any juices and scraps in the pan—you should have about 1/3 cup when you’re done. Taste for seasoning. 



When you’re ready to serve, swirl in the last of butter and more fresh herbs. Arrange the chicken on a platter or individual plates and pour the sauce over the pieces. 



Julia suggested serving this with some form of potatoes, but I usually serve chicken with rice, which is simpler to cook. Add something green (a summer salad, for instance) and voila! Le dîner est servi!
Thank you, Le Creuset! 


Only one more month to wait!

Wedding bells are ringing for Meg and Seth in the latest Orchard Mystery from the New York Times bestselling author of Picked to Die…

The fall harvest may be just about over, but orchard owner Meg Corey is busier than ever planning her wedding to Seth Chapin. Who knew picking apples would be less work than picking out rings and a dress? And even though the happy couple has invited most of Granford, Massachusetts, to the ceremony, they might have to make room for one more guest…

Ex-con Aaron Eastman has unexpectedly reappeared in his hometown, searching for answers to the tragic fire in his family’s past that put him behind bars twenty-five years ago. Moved by his sincerity, Meg vows to do everything she can to help him solve the cold case. As she cobbles together the clues, it becomes increasingly clear that Aaron may have been considered the bad seed of the family, but someone else was one bad apple…

Preorder it now at Amazon or Barnes and Noble

www.sheilaconnolly.com

Saturday, November 1, 2014

Warm Gingerbread with Whipped Cream

by Peg Cochran

Oh the weather outside is frightful...not quite that bad yet, but our temps here in Michigan are going down to the 20s in the next few days.  Brrrrrr!  Perfect weather for warm gingerbread with some cold whipped cream!  This is an old-fashioned favorite--and for a reason!  Spicy and sweet, it's a delicious end to a good dinner.  This recipe is from a very old James Beard Cookbook.  My paperback copy fell apart and my sister-in-law found a hard cover copy for me at a book sale.

James Beard was the consummate American chef called the  “Dean of American cookery” by the New York Times in 1954.  He hosted the first food program on television in 1946 when television was in its infancy, long before Emeril, Rachel Ray and Bobby Flay.  And like Julia Child, he wasn't afraid of butter and cream!  And Julia Child lived to be 92 and James Beard to 82, so maybe they were onto something!  Eschew processed food, eat real food in moderation, and live a long life.

This recipe is easy but oh, so, delicious on a cold winter's night! 

1 cup molasses
1 cup butter
2 1/3 cups flour
pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1 cup sour cream

Put molasses and butter in a saucepan and heat until they boil.  Let cool slightly.  Sift the flour with the salt, baking soda, ginger, cinnamon and cloves.  Stir the sour cream into the cooled molasses/butter mixture and stir in the flour and spices.

Bake at 350 for approximately 40 minutes in a pan sprayed with cooking spray or greased with butter. Serve warm (if desired) with a dollop of whipped cream.   


Heat butter and molasses until boiling and butter is melted.


Sift spices and flour together


Bake in a square pan coated with cooking spray


 

Delicious topped with whipped cream!

If you enjoy culinary mysteries you might like my Gourmet De-Lite series.  
Iced to Death is the latest book

Available at Amazon and B&N and most bookstores

Lucille Mazzarella, the protagonist in my Lucille series is always cooking huge Sunday dinners for her family and friends.  Unholy Matrimony is the second book in the series.


Available at Amazon and for all e-readers. 

Visit me on my web site, Facebook page or Twitter -- @pegcochran



Saturday, July 20, 2013

Mousse de Foies de Volaille or Chicken Liver Mousse


by Peg Cochran


This is a very elegant hors d’oeuvres that is easy to make and very inexpensive—the chicken livers were $1.05!  It’s impressive and so delicious, it will be gone in a flash.  We took a bowl to a friend’s for a weekend at her lake house and sat outside eating it on crackers and drinking a nice, light white wine.  The recipe is compliments of Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking.

1 lb. or about 2 cups chicken livers
2 TB shallots or minced green onions 
2 TB butter

Cut chicken livers into small pieces and mince shallots or green onions.  Saute in the butter until stiff but still rosy inside.

1/3 cup Madeira or cognac (I used inexpensive brandy)
¼ cup heavy cream
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp allspice
1/8 tsp pepper
pinch of thyme
½ cup melted butter

Put livers and shallots in a blender or food processor.  To the same pan, add the liquor and boil down rapidly until you have about 3 TB left. 

Add to blender along with livers and shallots.  Blend until you have a smooth paste.  Add melted butter and blend until incorporated.

The directions call for forcing the mixture through a sieve…I must confess to skipping that step and it was still delicious!

Chill until firm and cold.  Serve on French bread rounds or plain crackers.


Nicely blended

Out Now! 
Out Now!
Catch up with me at my website or on Facebook or follow me on Twitter @pegcochran

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Why City Chicken has no chicken: A new look at a century-old recipe by Cleo Coyle





Like "Chicken Fried" Steak, "City Chicken" is a delicious comfort food that makes use of the word chicken in the title but not in the recipe. So exactly what is City Chicken?

Well, if you take a six-inch wooden skewer, load it up with scraps of pork and/or veal, and dip it in flour, egg, and breading, you're on the right track. A good pan gravy should be made during the process, and in the recipe below, I’ll show you how I and my husband (and partner in crime writing) do ours. 
There are many variations, based on region. We do ours Pittsburgh style.

But first a bit of fun...

Do you remember the scene below 
in the biopic JULIE AND JULIA?

Julia Child is excited to meet the famous cookbook author Irma Rombauer, who wrote Joy of Cooking, and Irma tells Julia about her horrific publishing experience...


Here's an even greater calamity (in my opinion): My 7th edition (1997) JOY OF COOKING did not include the recipe! As noted above, City Chicken was included in earlier versions, and I'm happy to prove it from a photo of the page in my own well-worn copy of the 5th edition (the comb-ring bound version, which is over 40 years old now). If any of you have the 8th edition, you can check for the recipe in your index of "Joy Classics," to see if it's made a reappearance there!



How do "mock drumsticks" taste?

Incredibly good. City Chicken is a delicious way to cook pork. It's a relatively healthy entree, too, because pork is a white meat, and (in our Pittsburgh-style version) it's baked and not deep fried. 

Growing up just outside of Pittsburgh, Marc and I ate City Chicken regularly. Marc's mother actually made Wednesdays City Chicken night and served her hearty mock drumsticks with string beans and mashed potatoes—to soak up all that good pan gravy. Now if that's not a down-home comfort-food dinner, I don't know what is.

City Chicken is such a popular dish in the Pittsburgh area that some groceries sell "City Chicken" packs of pork pieces with skewers included. Wikipedia has an entry on City Chicken that actually features a picture of one of these Pittsburgh packs. (See Wiki photo at right.)

Ironically, though I now live in New York, the biggest city in the country, I cannot find "City Chicken" packs. Hey, that's okay. Marc and I don’t need them. And neither do you. Just look for packages of boneless pork and/or veal pieces (usually marked for stew), follow our recipe, and you’re all set to…

Cook with joy! 

Cleo Coyle's
City Chicken Recipe

To download a PDF copy of this recipe that you can print, save, or share, click here. 





Cleo Coyle, maker of mock
drumsticks, is author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries
So why do we call it "chicken," 
when no chicken is in it?

Short answer: When you couldn't afford real chicken, City Chicken was an alternative--a way to enjoy mock fried chicken drumsticks using scraps from the butcher. 

Where does the "city" part come in?

Although published recipes for "mock chicken," were found as far back as one hundred years ago, City Chicken really took off during the Depression, when fatty trimmings and meat scraps of pork, beef, and veal were less expensive than chicken, especially in urban areas that were far from poultry farms. 

And there you have it--the name explained.

As I noted above, there are many regional variations of the dish. Some are deep fried, others have no breading. The recipe we’re sharing today was how Marc's mother prepared it, and therefore made "Pittsburgh style," which means it will be breaded, sautéed, and baked. We just love it this way, and hope you will, too...




Makes six servings
 
INGREDIENTS:

- 6 six-inch wooden skewers (in a pinch, simply cut down longer skewers)

- 3 pounds of meat cubes (we use):
    1-½ pounds boneless pork pieces (or "stew meat") +
    1-½ pounds veal pieces (or "stew meat")

- 1 cup all-purpose flour


- 1 cup seasoned bread crumbs (we use Italian seasoned)

- 2 large eggs (beaten with fork)


- 1 tablespoon milk (or water) to thin the beaten eggs, making an "egg wash" for breading

- 1 medium white or yellow onion, chopped 

- ¼ cup vegetable oil 

- 2 Tablespoons butter 

- 2/3 cup chicken or veg stock

- Salt and pepper to taste

- 1 tablespoon (or so) Wondra flour or cornstarch

DIRECTIONS:

Note: If you bought "stew meat" packages as shown above, you should be ready to go. If you can't find stew meat, purchase pork loin chops and/or veal steaks and cut them into small pieces ( about 1- to 1-1/2 inches in size). 

Step 1: Prepare the Meat - Arrange the meat pieces on each of the six skewers. If using more than one type, alternate them (pork, veal, pork, veal, etc...) Fit the pieces together tightly to create a mock chicken drumstick. Dredge each of the mock drumsticks in flour, then in egg wash (2 eggs beaten with 1 T. milk or water), and finally coat generously with the seasoned bread crumbs.




Step 2: Brown the meat – Preheat oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit. While oven is heating, place the vegetable oil in a large oven-proof skillet over medium high heat. When this shallow oil is hot enough to ripple, add 1 tablespoon of butter and allow it to melt. Sauté the mock drumsticks about five minutes in the hot oil, turning often, until the outsides are golden brown. Remove the mock drumsticks from the pan and set them aside on a holding plate. Turn the heat to low.

Step 3: Sauté the onions – Add the chopped onion to the hot oil, along with about 1 tablespoon butter. Cook and stir over the low heat until the onions are brown, about five minutes. Now return the mock drumsticks to the pan (along with any drippings that may have accumulated on the holding plate). Cook them only for another minute or two.


Step 4: Bake in the oven – Add ½ cup chicken or vegetable stock to the skillet, cover with a lid, and bake in the preheated oven for about 50 minutes, or until the meat is tender. 




Step 5: Make the gravy - The onions and stock create a nice gravy as the meat cooks. While you can spoon this thin gravy over the mock drumsticks as is, we prefer to thicken it. To do this, you'll need to remove all of the mock drumsticks from the pan while leaving the liquid in there...



Over low heat, whisk the Wondra flour (or cornstarch) into the liquid. If you like, you can stir a bit of butter into the gravy for richness, as well, although it's not a necessity. Simmer for a minute or two, whisking in more flour or cornstarch until the gravy thickens to your liking. Then plate the mock drumsticks, spoon the gravy over them, as shown, and...



Eat with joy!
~ Cleo Coyle

New York Times bestselling author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries


Yes, this is me, Cleo (aka Alice). 
Friend me on facebook here.
Follow me on twitter here
Visit my online coffeehouse here.




The Coffeehouse Mysteries are bestselling
works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark
Greenwich Village coffeehouse, and each of the
12 titles includes the added bonus of recipes. 
To learn more, click here. 
 

The Ghost and
Mrs. McClure


Book #1 of 

The Haunted Bookshop
Mysteries
, which Cleo writes
under the name
Alice Kimberly

To learn more, click here