Showing posts with label Father's Day. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Father's Day. Show all posts

Thursday, June 11, 2015

Alvina's Crumb Cake #FathersDay @LucyBurdette #recipe




Alvina's Crumb Cake, passed down from Bob Isleib to his family 

With father's day coming up soon, it's hard not to think of my sweet dad--I still miss him a lot. He was a great dad, and an interesting, funny man who was crazy about his family.

My dad and his darling wife, Mary Jane

My father did not cook much, but he was proud of the two recipes in his repertoire. One was his easy but controversial method for making pie crust, which he used to make occasional apple pies.




The other was this recipe for coffee cake. I love having the recipe card in his handwriting--a treasure in my box. Although I've canvassed my living relatives, no one is completely sure who Alvina was.

I made a few tweaks to his recipe including using cake flour which makes a finer crumb. I also added butter and brown sugar to the topping, and reduced the oven temperature. (I remember the cake often coming out crispy.)



Ingredients

2 cups granulated sugar
1/2 lb (2 sticks) butter, softened
4 cups flour, cake if you have it
4 tsp baking powder
3 beaten eggs
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup Milk

 



1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 stick butter
1 tsp cinnamon
1/3 cup additional flour

Preheat the oven to 350.

Pulse the sugar, 2 sticks of butter, and flour together. (I used a stand mixer—small lumps are acceptable, even encouraged.) Remove one cup of this mixture for topping and in another bowl, cut in 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 stick of butter, and 1/2 cup brown sugar. Set that aside.

To the original  mixture, add 4 heaping tsp baking powder and 3 beaten eggs. Mix well.

Mix in the milk and vanilla—do not overbeat.


 

 Pour into a well-buttered 9 by 13 inch pan and sprinkle crumbs over top. Bake for 35 or so minutes, or until a toothpick stuck in the middle comes out dry.

 


This is also delicious with a handful of fresh blueberries folded in before baking.

When she is not blogging and cooking, Lucy Burdette writes the Key West food critic mysteries!

Fatal Reservations, the sixth book in the series, will be in bookstores on July 7, but you can certainly order it now! And, to begin the countdown and launch the celebration, we will be giving away one copy of the new book--leave a comment with your email to be entered in the drawing.

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Strawberry Shortcake--with a Twist



LUCY BURDETTE: I know Father's Day has flown past, but I couldn't resist a shout-out to two fabulous fathers, my dad on the left and my father-in-law on the right. We miss them so!

And I wanted to make something special but not too complicated to help celebrate Father's Day for John. 


It's hard to resist the idea of strawberry shortcake, right? Especially since last Saturday was "National Strawberry Shortcake Day!"Fresh strawberries, crisp, warm
biscuits, homemade whipped cream. The problem is the reality often doesn't quite match up with that fantasy. I'd rather pass than gobble a bread-y supermarket biscuit. And whipped cream out of a can? Just can't do it. 

But as I was making biscuits for dinner the other night, adding a little white whole wheat flour instead of all white, and whirring the oats so they had just enough texture, I thought--now these would be perfect for strawberry shortcake! They are whole grain, but not in an obnoxious aren't I healthy way, and they soak up the strawberry juice without disintegrating into mush:). 

For the biscuits: Make a recipe of the Cottage Oat biscuits a la Jane Brody--recipe right here. Or, if you were clever enough to freeze some, take a few out to thaw.

For the whipped cream:

1 cup heavy or whipped cream
1 tsp vanilla
1 big ripe strawberry, mashed
1 tablespoon powdered sugar

I decided to experiment with adding a little strawberry to the cream so it would come out slightly pink:). So I mashed one big strawberry and mixed it with the sugar. I was worried about making the whipped cream watery, but next time I think I'd use two strawberries. So whip the cream until it's thick, add the vanilla, whip in the strawberry-sugar mixture. You can do this ahead and refrigerate.

For the strawberries, themselves:

 2 cups of strawberries, cleaned and sliced
1 Tbsp sugar

My sister has always taught me that if you rinse fruit and veggies that aren't organic in a bowl of water to which white vinegar has been added, you lose pesticide residue. (I almost always listen to her LOL, so you probably should too!)

Slice the strawberries, stir in the sugar, refrigerate until you're ready to put everything together.


Warm the biscuits, split them open and heap with strawberries, then add the pink whipped cream.  Voila! A celebration fit for a king!


Photo showcases strawberries

Better shot of the biscuit






MURDER WITH GANACHE, the fourth Key West mystery, is in stores now. DEATH WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS will be out in December.

 Follow Lucy on Facebook

And Twitter

And Pinterest.




Tuesday, June 10, 2014

What would YOU deep fry? Father’s Day Giveaway from Cleo Coyle



Behold two "Danger Dogs,"
deep-fried bacon-wrapped hot dogs.
Frighteningly delicious!




My husband and I first heard about the "Danger Dog" via a friend in Los Angeles, where the recipe has made its way north from the street food of Tijuana, Mexico. 

Esquire magazine actually put the "bacon-wrapped hot dog" on its list of "Sixty Things Worth Shortening Your Life For." What number was the bacon dog? Hard to believe it but #1. To see the entire list, click here


More fun trivia...


Where the Danger Dogs Roam

  • Down Mexico way, the original Danger Dog (aka Tijuana Bacon Dog) is topped with grilled onions and hot chili. North of the border, this same barker is often topped with mayonnaise, and in Los Angeles, California, it’s known as a street dog.
  • The Jersey Breakfast Dog is a bacon-wrapped hot dog that is deep fried until it’s curled or falling apart. Also called rippers, they're served with fried or scrambled eggs.
  • A Chicago variation is the Francheezie, a jumbo hot dog split and stuffed with cheddar or Velveeta cheese before it’s wrapped in bacon and (oh, yes) fried.
The truth is, when my dear Marc fries up these babies (and he doesn't do it often, thank goodness), he always prepares one for me. It may be disgusting, but it’s also to die foran unfortunate phrase since too many of these puppies would insure it, as Esquire pointed out!



Cleo Coyle has a partner in
crime-writing—her husband.
Learn about their books
by clicking here and here.
Cleo Coyle's
Danger Dog


Because we don’t own a deep fryer, my husband was forced to adapt and overcome—to borrow a motto from the Marines, a few of whom would probably enjoy this recipe, too, with a few good beers. And since Father's Day happens to be this Sunday...

*Optional Grilling instructions below...

Makes 6 servings 

6 hot dogs 
6 slices bacon 
1 cup vegetable oil (we use canola oil) 
6 hot dog buns 
12 wooden toothpicks 

(Additional optional topping suggestions: grilled or raw onions, mayo, mustard, relish, chopped tomatoes, jalapeno peppers, etc.) 

Step 1—Slice the hot dogs (important)Slit each dog lengthwise. Don’t split the dogs in two, simply cut a deep slice. This cut will help the hot dog cook at the same fast pace as the bacon. It also will prevent the dog from bursting when it hits the hot oil.

Step 2—Wrap with bacon: Take one slice of bacon, regular or thick cut, and tuck the end of the slice into the cut at the tip of the hot dog. Wrap the bacon around the hot dog, being careful to completely cover the hot dog with the bacon. When finished wrapping, tuck the opposite end of the bacon into the hot dog's slit. Secure both ends with dry toothpicks. See my photos below.


(If grilling over charcoal, gas, or an open flame, be sure to soak the toothpicks in water for at least an hour before inserting into the dogs. This will prevent the toothpicks from burning. See more grilling notes below.)


Step 3—Fry the dogs (*see grilling option below)Place about one inch of oil at the bottom of a skillet and heat at medium until the oil is shimmering and ready to smoke, about five minutes. (If using a deep fryer, set to 375° F.) When the oil is hot enough, quickly place 2 to 4 hot dogs into the oil. For best results, do not fry too many at one time. If pan frying, cook about three minutes on one side, then turn and fry for an additional four minutes. If using a deep fryer cook the hot dogs for about seven minutes. Remove from heat and drain on a paper towel. Serve warm on a bun and add your favorite condiments.



*GRILLING OPTION: To grill bacon-wrapped hot dogs, keep these notes in mind: (1) Soak the toothpicks in water for a good hour before inserting or they may burn up on your grill. Or use metal skewers instead of toothpicks and you won't have to worry. (2) The cooking time will be longer on the grill, about 6 to 8 minutes per side. You're watching for the bacon to cook through without burning.

F o o d i e
P h o t o s









My Giveaway Question to You

Now that we've entered carnival and state fair season,
the deep-frying floodgates are open. I've never tried a
deep-fried Twinkie, but I'm game...

What are you longing 
to see deep fried?

The comment contest is
now closed. To see my three winners,
read the announcement post
by clicking here.


(BTW) Yes, I bought a mug for Marc!
They are sold by the wonderful
One Good Woman Coffee and Tea,
at this link!




~ Cleo Coyle

New York Times bestselling author of
The Coffeehouse Mysteries

Yes, this is me, Cleo (aka Alice). 
Friend me on facebook here.
Follow me on twitter here
Visit my online home here.





To view the
Coffeehouse Mystery
book trailer, click here.
 







The Coffeehouse Mysteries
Free Title Checklist
(with mini plot summaries)


The Coffeehouse Mysteries are bestselling
works of amateur sleuth fiction set in a landmark
Greenwich Village coffeehouse, and each of the
13 titles includes the added bonus of recipes. 






Sign up for my newsletter!
Simply write an e-mail that says
"Sign me up" and send it to this address...

CoffeehouseMystery@gmail(dot)com 

This will also enter you in my weekly
Free Coffee Drawings.
Every week, I give away a package of
premium coffee to a subscriber.
Good luck!




* * *


The hardcover bestseller
is releasing in paperback
August 2014


A Coffeehouse Mystery 

*Starred Review* -Kirkus

"...a highly satisfying mystery."
-Publishers Weekly


See the book's
Recipe Guide by

clicking here.


*** 



Haunted Bookshop
Mysteries

Free Title Checklist,
with mini plot summaries,



Tuesday, June 12, 2012

What Is a Danger Dog? Cleo Coyle Tells You and Cooks One Up!



My husband, Marc, doesn’t smoke. He doesn’t drink (much). But on days he’s semi-suicidal (few and far between, thank goodness), he makes this lunch. Needless to say, I cringe when I see the ingredients hit the kitchen counter: hot dog, bacon, cooking oil…oh, god.

Marc first heard about the "Danger Dog" via a good friend in Los Angeles, where the recipe has made its way north from the street food of Tijuana, Mexico. Here's the scoop on this deep fried bacon-wrapped hot dog and its variations.

Where the Danger Dogs Roam

  • Down Mexico way, the original Danger Dog (aka Tijuana Bacon Dog) is topped with grilled onions and hot chili. North of the border, this same barker is often topped with mayonnaise, and in Los Angeles, California, it’s known as a street dog.

  • The Jersey Breakfast Dog is a bacon-wrapped hot dog that is deep fried until it’s curled or falling apart. Also called rippers, they're served with fried or scrambled eggs.

  • A Chicago variation is the Francheezie, a jumbo hot dog split and stuffed with cheddar or Velveeta cheese before it’s wrapped in bacon and (oh, yes) fried.
The truth is, when Marc fries up these babies, he always prepares one for me. I hate to admit this, but I do consume it with (you guessed it) joy. It may be disgusting, but it’s also to die foran unfortunate phrase since too many of these puppies would insure it. 

Finally, a fun note. A few years ago, Esquire magazine actually put the "bacon-wrapped hot dog" on its list of Sixty Things Worth Shortening Your Life For. What number was the bacon dog? Hard to believe it, but #1. To see the entire list, click here

Esquire's list left me wondering
what would be on yours?


Cleo Coyle, Danger Dog eater,
 is author of The Coffeehouse
 Mysteries



What food or foods would you shorten your life for? 
As a writer who deals in food and death, I'd really like to know. Just leave your answer in the comments and have a delicious day.






Because we don’t own a deep fryer, my husband was forced to adapt and overcome—to borrow a motto from the Marines, a few of whom would probably enjoy this recipe, too, with a few good beers. And since Father's Day happens to be this Sunday...


Cleo Coyle's Danger Dog!
Fried, Bacon-Wrapped Hot Dog


*Optional Grilling instructions below...

Makes 6 servings 

6 hot dogs 
6 slices bacon 
1 cup vegetable oil (we use canola oil) 
6 hot dog buns 
12 wooden toothpicks 

(Additional optional topping suggestions: grilled or raw onions, mayo, mustard, relish, chopped tomatoes, jalapeno peppers, etc.)

Step 1—Slice the hot dogs (important): Slit each dog lengthwise. Don’t split the dogs in two, simply cut a deep slice. This cut will help the hot dog cook at the same fast pace as the bacon. It also will prevent the dog from bursting when it hits the hot oil.

Step 2—Wrap with bacon: Take one slice of bacon, regular or thick cut, and tuck the end of the slice into the cut at the tip of the hot dog. Wrap the bacon around the hot dog, being careful to completely cover the hot dog with the bacon. When finished wrapping, tuck the opposite end of the bacon into the hot dog's slit. Secure both ends with dry toothpicks. See my photos below.


(If grilling over charcoal, gas, or an open flame, be sure to soak the toothpicks in water for at least an hour before inserting into the dogs. This will prevent the toothpicks from burning. See more grilling notes below.)



Step 3—Fry the dogs (*see grilling option below): Place about one inch of oil at the bottom of a skillet and heat at medium until the oil is shimmering and ready to smoke, about five minutes. (If using a deep fryer, set to 375° F.) When the oil is hot enough, quickly place 2 to 4 hot dogs into the oil. For best results, do not fry too many at one time. If pan frying, cook about three minutes on one side, then turn and fry for an additional four minutes. If using a deep fryer cook the hot dogs for about seven minutes. Remove from heat and drain on a paper towel. Serve warm on a bun and add your favorite condiments.




*GRILLING OPTION: To grill bacon-wrapped hot dogs, keep these notes in mind: (1) Soak the toothpicks in water for a good hour before inserting or they may burn up on your grill. Or use metal skewers instead of toothpicks and you won't have to worry. (2) The cooking time will be longer on the grill, about 6 to 8 minutes per side. You're watching for the bacon to cook through without burning.

F o o d i e
P h o t o s








Happy Father's
Day!

Eat with joy.

~ Cleo Coyle, author of 
The Coffeehouse Mysteries 



To view the
Coffeehouse Mystery
book trailer, click here.




To get more of my recipes, enter to win
free coffee, or learn about my books, including
my bestselling 
Haunted Bookshop series, visit my online coffeehouse: CoffeehouseMystery.com



The Coffeehouse Mysteries are national bestselling
culinary mysteries set in a landmark Greenwich Village 
coffeehouse, and each of the ten titles includes the 
added bonus of recipes. 
 


The Ghost and
Mrs. McClure


Book #1 of 

The Haunted Bookshop
Mysteries
, which Cleo writes
under the name Alice Kimberly
To learn more, click here.