Showing posts with label Daryl Wood Gerber. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Daryl Wood Gerber. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Have you ever had a Scotch egg? Delish! Plus book #giveaway from @DarylWoodGerber


 From Daryl aka Avery:

Happy Valentine's Day. This is NOT a Valentine's post. Although I "loved" writing it, does that count? FYI, I am having a giveaway below.  Now that's true love, right? LOL

*

When I researched foods I wanted to share in my upcoming Pressing the Issue, the 6th Cookbook Nook Mystery that features a Renaissance Fair plus a wedding at a vineyard (hence why I used "pressing" in the title), I was astounded by the variety. There are Renaissance Fair sites that specify which foods they feature, like hawker's mush and roasted legs of turkey, and creamed spinach, and yes, Scotch eggs. The vendors have charming names, too. Like Mayhawke Armory and Faire-icatures and Wicks and Woods.


As a writer, I like to make up my own names for venues, so check them out as you read along. I particularly like Thistle Thy Fancy, a crafts and hair wreaths.

As a foodie mystery writer, I like to make up my own recipes. This Scotch Eggs one is really simple and since there aren't many ingredients, so I couldn't quite pretend that I came up with all the ingredients; however, I made a gluten-free version that was very tasty. A few weeks ago, I mentioned using gluten-free panko crumbs for a veggie recipe. Well, they work for this, as well, so if you need to eat gluten-free, or you're just trying to avoid the wheat belly syndrome that is so popular right now, give them a try. (*I used Ian's brand.)

Enjoy, you varlets.

-->
Scotch Eggs
(Serves 4)

1 pound bulk pork sausage
1 teaspoon dried parsley
1 teaspoon salt
4 hard-boiled eggs, peeled
Flour or cornstarch (to make gluten-free, use cornstarch or rice flour)
1 egg, beaten
3/4 cup panko crispy breadcrumbs (if necessary, use gluten-free crumbs)

Heat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a large bowl, mix pork sausage, parsley, and salt. You’ll need to use your hands. Shape mixture into 4 patties.

Roll each hard-boiled egg in flour (or cornstarch/rice flour) to coat.

Place egg on sausage patty and cover egg by wrapping sausage around it. Dip each hard-boiled/sausage egg into beaten egg. Coat with panko breadcrumbs to cover completely (you may use gluten-free panko crumbs).

Set on ungreased cookie sheet.

Bake 35 minutes or until sausage is thoroughly cooked through and no longer pink near the egg.


How to Make the Perfect Hard-Boiled Egg

In a medium saucepan, cover 4 eggs with water. Bring eggs to boil. This takes about 7 minutes. Reduce heat to simmer and cook for 13 minutes. Remove saucepan from heat and immediately pour off hot water. Add cold water to the saucepan.

Meanwhile, fetch a dozen or so ice cubes from your freezer. Pour off the water from the eggs, and add fresh cold water and ice cubes. Let sit for 20 minutes. Remove eggs from water. Store in refrigerator until using.

THE ABOVE RECIPE IS IN THE BOOK. My daughter-in-law swears by another method, which I just tried this weekend and it worked like a dream. She brings a pot of water to boil. Inserts the eggs (using tongs) one at a time, and boils them on high boil for 10 minutes. She removes the eggs and they are done. Much simpler than my method. Both work.  :)







What is PRESSING THE ISSUE about?


The annual Renaissance Fair serves up a helping of crafty courtiers, damsels in distress, and medieval murder . . .

As the annual Renaissance Fair comes to Crystal Cove, Jenna Hart’s Cookbook Nook is packed with tasty treats and all things medieval, while her pal Bailey is ready to swoon over her upcoming nuptials at a local vineyard. But when the two friends discover the body of the vineyard’s owner bludgeoned by a wine press, all their merriment fades, along with their hopes for a vintage year.

Which churlish varlet did the deed? Was it the victim’s errant brother, who stood to inherit the vineyards? Or the owner’s crestfallen ex-girlfriend? Mayhap it was the newly arrived lusty wench, or her jealous husband. Fie on them all! Verily, Jenna can’t rest until justice is served, and she vows to track down the killer. But can she sniff out the truth before the villainous culprit strikes again? 


Pressing the Issue will come out Feb 20 in e-book and print on demand. You can order the e-book now and the POD on the day of release. PREORDER NOW 





GIVEAWAY

To celebrate the upcoming release of PRESSING THE ISSUE, I'm giving away to one commenter a choice of any of my currently published titles. Tell me, what kind of medieval food would suit your fancy?
-->Remember to include your email (cryptically if necessary) so I can contact you if you win. -->


Savor the mystery!


Friend Daryl and Avery on Facebook
Follow Daryl on Twitter
Follow Avery on Twitter
Follow both of us on Pinterest
Plus check out my website.

A DEADLY ÉCLAIR, the 1st in the French Bistro Mysteries.

Can Mimi clear her name before the killer turns up the heat?
Click here to order.

GRILLING THE SUBJECT, the 5th Cookbook Nook Mystery!
The Wild West Extravaganza has come to Crystal Cove. Click here to order.

FOR CHEDDAR OR WORSE, the 7th Cheese Shop Mystery is out!
Finally there's going to be a cheese festival in Providence!
Click to order.

GIRL ON THE RUN, a stand-alone suspense.
When a fairytale fantasy night becomes a nightmare, Chessa Paxton must run for her life...but will the truth set her free?
Click to order

DAY OF SECRETS, a stand-alone suspense
A mother he thought was dead. A father he never knew.
An enemy that wants them dead.
Click here to order




Wednesday, February 7, 2018

The Renaissance Fair is coming to town! Shepherd's pie #recipe + book #giveaway from @DarylWoodGerber


From Daryl:

Giveaway below!

That's right. The Renaissance Fair is coming to Crystal Cove in the 6th Cookbook Nook Mystery, PRESSING THE ISSUE. The book comes out February 20. You can pre-order the e-book now; the paper will be available starting February 20. Keep your eyes peeled. 

I had so much fun researching this story. I visited the Renaissance Fair in Los Angeles, which is huge! Acres and acres of fun. (*The fair in my story is on a much smaller scale, with vendors lining the Pier, which marks the most southern end of town.) I dressed for the occasion, and I talked fair speak to any who would listen. What's fair speak? That's using medieval terms to express something.

For example: E’en means evening. Good morrow means good day. Verily means truthfully, and so on. There are lots of websites devoted to teaching a future fair-goer how to speak. 

I took in the bird of prey show. I watched dancers frolic to lively music. I shopped. And I ate.  How I love a good roasted leg of turkey! 



To celebrate the upcoming release of the book, for the next few weeks, I'm giving away previous books in the series so  you can get up to speed on where Jenna is at this point in her life. She's running the Cookbook Nook. She's learning how to cook more than just 5-ingredient recipes. And she's falling madly in love with Rhett. Oh, and she's also solving a mystery or two.  A woman's work is never done.

Shepherd’s Pie
Shepherd’s pie was originally called “cottage pie” because the poorer people of Britain, who lived in cottages, started using potatoes in their everyday diet. Nowadays, a dish made with beef is referred to as cottage pie, while a dish made with lamb is shepherd’s pie. I have fun scoring the mashed potato topping. I hope you do, too.

(Serves 69)

1 to 1 1/2 pounds potatoes (about 12 large brown potatoes), peeled and quartered.
2 teaspoons salt, divided
8 tablespoons (1 stick) butter, divided (more, if necessary)
2 medium onions, chopped (about 2 cups)
1 cup diced carrots
1 1/2 pounds ground lamb
2 teaspoons ground black pepper, divided
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 cup broth (more, if necessary; beef or chicken will do)
1 teaspoon rosemary
1 cup peas
2 tablespoons cream or milk (more, if desired)
Cheese, if desired

First, peel and quarter the potatoes. Then place the potatoes in a medium-sized stockpot and cover them with cold water. Add a teaspoon of salt. Bring the potatoes to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender, about 20 minutes; a fork should be able to easily pierce them. When done, drain the water, but leave the potatoes in the pot.

Next, melt 4 tablespoons of the butter in a large sauté pan on medium heat. Add the chopped onions and carrots and cook until tender, about 610 minutes.

Add the ground lamb to the pan with the onions. Break into small pieces with the side of a spoon. Cook the meat until no longer pink. Season with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Add the Worcestershire sauce, broth, and rosemary. Bring the broth to a simmer and reduce heat to low. Cook uncovered for 10 minutes, adding more broth, if necessary, to keep the meat from drying out. Add the peas, stir, and then remove meat mixture from heat.

Add the remaining 4 tablespoons of butter to the potatoes that you have reserved in the stockpot, plus add 2 tablespoons cream or milk. Mash with a fork or potato masher, and season with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. (Add more butter, cream, or milk if necessary so potatoes are moist.)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Place the meat mixture in an 8 x 8 pan. Top with the mashed potatoes. Score the surface of the mashed potatoes with a fork so there are peaks that will get well browned. Be creative.

Place casserole in oven and cook until browned and bubbling, about 2030 minutes. If necessary, broil for the last few minutes to help the surface of the mashed potatoes brown.

If desired, sprinkle grated cheddar cheese or Parmesan cheese over the top of the mashed potatoes before baking.

*For a 13 x 9 pan, double the recipe.

The annual Renaissance Fair serves up a helping of crafty courtiers, damsels in distress, and medieval murder . . .

As the annual Renaissance Fair comes to Crystal Cove, Jenna Hart’s Cookbook Nook is packed with tasty treats and all things medieval, while her pal Bailey is ready to swoon over her upcoming nuptials at a local vineyard. But when the two friends discover the body of the vineyard’s owner bludgeoned by a wine press, all their merriment fades, along with their hopes for a vintage year.

Which churlish varlet did the deed? Was it the victim’s errant brother, who stood to inherit the vineyards? Or the owner’s crestfallen ex-girlfriend? Mayhap it was the newly arrived lusty wench, or her jealous husband. Fie on them all! Verily, Jenna can’t rest until justice is served, and she vows to track down the killer. But can she sniff out the truth before the villainous culprit strikes again? 


Pressing the Issue will come out Feb 20 in e-book and print on demand. You can order the e-book now and the POD on the day of release. Plus you'll find it in LIBRARIES!  PREORDER NOW 





GIVEAWAY

To celebrate the upcoming release of PRESSING THE ISSUE, I'm giving away to one commenter a choice of any of my currently published Cookbook Nook Mysteries. Tell me have you ever attended a festival? Would you like to?



Savor the mystery!
-->
Friend Daryl and Avery on Facebook
Follow Daryl on Twitter
Follow Avery on Twitter
Follow both of us on Pinterest
Plus check out my website.

A DEADLY ÉCLAIR, the 1st in the French Bistro Mysteries.
Can Mimi clear her name before the killer turns up the heat?
Click here to order.

GRILLING THE SUBJECT, the 5th Cookbook Nook Mystery!
The Wild West Extravaganza has come to Crystal Cove. Click here to order.

FOR CHEDDAR OR WORSE, the 7th Cheese Shop Mystery is out!
Finally there's going to be a cheese festival in Providence!
Click to order.

GIRL ON THE RUN, a stand-alone suspense.
When a fairytale fantasy night becomes a nightmare, Chessa Paxton must run for her life...but will the truth set her free?
Click to order

DAY OF SECRETS, a stand-alone suspense
A mother he thought was dead. A father he never knew.
An enemy that wants them dead.
Click here to order.





Monday, February 5, 2018

Around Our Kitchen Table: Food Mystery Mentors + book #giveaway

Today we welcome you to sit and chat with us around our kitchen table. Read all the way to the bottom for the super giveaway we're offering...


Lucy Burdette: I’ve been thinking about how food has become such a major part of my character’s life—and hence my Key West food critic mystery series—that it’s hard to imagine not including it in a book. And I’m certain that writing about food and creating recipes for the series and for this blog has helped me become a better cook. It’s been life-changing...

How did I even get started down this path? I can point to Diane Mott Davidson’s series starring Goldy the caterer as a major influence. I loved reading about how Goldy cooked—so effortlessly. And then how her new cop husband took care of her by baking special treats, creating homey dinners, and making her delicious coffee. I inhaled the food in these books! Food was love, and that’s how my character Hayley Snow thinks about it, too. (And so you can imagine how thrilled I was to have a quote from Diane Mott Davidson on my first Key West book...)


🍴

Writers, how did you get started writing culinary mysteries? Can you point to a certain influence?


Sheila Connolly: Everyone eats, right? So food--both making and consuming--is a common thread that links us all.

Diane Mott Davidson was one of the first cozy mystery writers I ever read, and when I went to a signing of hers, rather than her book I asked her to autograph one of her recipes. I watched Julia Child give a cooking demonstration in San Francisco, and I dedicated a book to Alice Waters. I've been a foodie since before the term was invented!


Then it hit me: Nero Wolfe! The main character in Rex Stout's series who was more interested the the menu for his next exquisite meal than in solving the crime at hand. I bought the Nero Wolfe Cookbook (which Stout is said to have supervised carefully so it remains true to the series) when it was released, and I have used it regularly for decades.

Oddly enough, many of the main characters that I've written don't cook, or no more than enough to keep themselves alive, but there's almost always a friend or sidekick who cooks.




🍒

Denise Swanson: Not all of my main characters cook, but they all like to eat. In my Scumble River series, Skye has learned to cook, in my Devereaux's Dime Store series, Dev has no interest in learning, But in my new Chef-to-Go series Dani Sloan has always loved puttering around the kitchen and finally gets to fulfill her dream of becoming a chef.

I'm betting nearly all mystery writers who write culinary cozies were influenced by Diane Mott Davidson. I LOVE her books and her recipes. But I was really influenced to write a culinary mystery series by all the television cooking programs. I watch Hell's Kitchen, Iron Chef, Chopped, Top Chef, all the baking shows, and, yes, even the America's Worst Cooks. 



🍇 

LESLIE:

I'd been writing unsold mysteries for years when I shifted gears to write my first published book, Books, Crooks and Counselors: How to Write Accurately About Criminal Law and Courtroom Procedure. After that, I didn't know what was next, but in my heart I was still a mystery writer. The culinary mystery had begun to emerge--including books by some of my friends--and I devoured them! We'd also just taken a month-long trip to France, which completely changed our relationship to eating and cooking. Krista, Daryl, and Peg were the fairy godmothers of my first published mystery, Death al Dente, reviewing the proposal and helping me find an agent and editor.

I, too, was inspired by Diane Mott Davidson's Goldie series, not just for the food, but because she recognized that the cozy could be about something serious. She incorporated social justice issues into the mystery. Later, I discovered Cleo's Coffeehouse Mysteries and saw that she did something similar, inspiring me to weave issues related to homelessness, domestic abuse, and immigration into my Spice Shop series, along with the food and fun. The cozy really can do it all!

🍑

Linda Wiken: In case you hadn't heard, and I'm happy to share this information whenever I talk about my Dinner Club Mysteries, my character JJ Tanner and I share one very huge trait. We both love cookbooks, and magazines, especially the one with color photos. Now, if that cookbook features cooking from another country along with information on the setting and culinary culture, I'm doubly in.

That's what sparked my interest in writing a cozy culinary series. I wasn't, and still am not, a great cook. But I love reading about something new and especially, combinations of different tastes. As does, JJ. Who knows, perhaps one day we'll both shine in the kitchen.

My inspirations have been the many delicious cozy series and, like Denise, the food programs on TV. I subscribe to the Food Network and spend a portion of my daily viewing time enjoying the shows. Cooks vs Cons is a favorite. And, don't forget those magazines -- Food and Wine, Taste of Italia, and Bon Appetit to name a few.


🌿


Daryl Wood Gerber: The foodie genre sort of picked me. My first attempt at writing a mystery was a Nancy Drew mystery, way back when. That was when I was a girl and it has since disappeared. Go figure! LOL Mom was quite discerning in regards to my baby book content. When I really applied myself, I cranked out a few standalone mysteries, but the agent who liked my work said she couldn’t sell “those.” She needed something with more of a "hook"—a series. I put together a number of proposals for her, but those didn’t satisfy her, either. Then Berkley Publishing approached her with a concept for a cheese shop mystery. She asked if I wanted to audition to write it. I'd catered. I'd run restaurants. I was a cook. I loved cheese--the basics. Sure! So I auditioned and got the job. That’s when I turned to writing cozy mysteries, writing The Cheese Shop Mysteries as Avery Aames. I immersed myself in the world of cheese and found that I wrote about cheese and food well. And so I continue to write other food themed mysteries: the Cookbook Nook Mysteries and the French Bistro Mysteries. By the way, to write about French food, I had to do a lot of TASTY research. I'm a better cook because of it. 


🌷

Krista Davis: Hmm, which came first? The food or the mystery? Food was a big deal in my family. My parents were immigrants and I have noticed that even while they are assimilating and trying out hot dogs and apple pie, most immigrants seek out the dishes they remember from home. Anyone recall the moussaka scene in the lunchroom in My Big Fat Greek Wedding?

While I was chowing down on my mom's delicious cooking, I was addicted to mysteries. So when the idea for the Domestic Diva Mysteries arose, it seemed like a natural to me. What could be better than a mystery with food?

I have to say that writing culinary mysteries and Mystery Lovers' Kitchen have made me a much better cook. You wouldn't believe how fast you run out of your go-to and family recipes when you have to post one every week!

Like Denise, I love watching cooking shows. My mom was devoted to Julia Child, so I began watching them long before there were channels devoted solely to food. But having to come up with new recipes all the time for books and Mystery Lovers Kitchen has made me even more aware of food. I think I might be a little bit too interested in people's favorite recipes and delicious meals that I have when eating out.



Cleo Coyle: Krista, like you, I grew up in a family with strong food traditions, and I can also relate to My Big Fat Greek Wedding (Italian-style)! As for the link between food and fiction, it really began for me back in the early 1980s with the late, great author and screenwriter Nora Ephron. When I read Ms. Ephron's novel HeartburnI loved that she included recipes and food talk as part of her storytelling. Learning from Ms. Ephron, I try to do the same with my Coffeehouse Mysteries, which I write with my husband, using foods, drinks, and recipes to explore and express character, setting, and story. 

Nora’s book was published back in 1983, long before the current culinary mystery trend, but there was another work, published even earlier (1976), that also left an impression on me: Someone is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe. Do any of you remember the screwball comedy film that was based on the book? Well, that book was penned by married collaborators Nan and Ivan Lyons. A married couple writing fun, foodie fiction seemed like a delicious prospect to me, even though writing is a crazy way to make a living. I'm just lucky my future husband turned out to be a guy willing to take a wild, collaborative ride—and he turned out to be a pretty darn good cook, too! ~ Cleo

🍴
 
Giveaway!
We have a fabulous giveaway to go with today's post--copies of Daryl's upcoming release PRESSING THE ISSUE (Feb 20, might take a week or so to get this), Krista's upcoming COLOR ME MURDER, and Sheila's latest release, MANY A TWIST. Plus an MLK tote bag!







Leave a comment about how you got started reading foodie mysteries to be entered in the drawing...
the winner will be announced on Friday.

Sunday, February 4, 2018

Welcome guest author Amanda Flower + book #giveaway

Amanda Flower is a national bestselling and Agatha Award- winning mystery author. She also writes mysteries as USA Today bestselling author Isabella Alan. In addition to being an author, Amanda is a librarian in Northeast Ohio. Her newest release is Lethal Licoricean Amish Candy Shop Mystery. Follow Amanda on Social Media at: Facebook Twitter Instagram

Beet Pasta Salad

By Amanda Flower

I work full time as a librarian, and I write full time too. I don’t have a lot of opportunity to cook, and one the tasks I dislike the most is packing my lunch for days I’m at the library. After a while, PB and J really gets old. So I have made up recipes that I can make in bulk that will last me the whole week. And even though I write the Amish Candy Shop Mysteries, which are full of sweets, I try to eat as healthy as possible and try to stick to more fruits and veggies in my lunches than candy. Most of the time, I’m successful at that.

One of the recipes that I make a lot is Beet Pasta Salad. It’s fast and easy, and I can pack it perfectly proportioned containers of it for all five days of the work week. I came up with this recipe because I love pasta salad and I love beets. One day, I just decided to put them together. Since I’m a vegetarian, I always have fresh veggies in the house, so I just add whatever vegetables that I have on hand the day I made the salad.

If you are like me and really get tired of sandwiches day after day, this might be the recipe for you.

Enjoy!

Beet Pasta Salad

Ingredients:

1 can of whole beets
1 16 oz box of penne pasta
Raw vegetables of your choice
Salt and pepper
Italian salad dressing or oil and vinegar

Directions:
1)    Boil pasta
2)    Rough chop vegetables
3)    Rough chop beets
4)    Mix pasta, vegetables, beets, and Italian salad dressing in a bowl
5)    Add salt and pepper to taste
6)    Refrigerate overnight





GIVEAWAY

Amanda is offering a copy of Assaulted Caramel today to one commenter. So do tell...what do you like for lunch? Leave your email (cryptic if necessary) so Amanda can get in contact with you should you win.


 Follow Amanda on Social Media at: Facebook Twitter Instagram