Showing posts with label Chicken. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Chicken. Show all posts

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Rosemary and Lemon Chicken #Recipe @PegCochran

This is one of those easy yet tasty and delicious one-pan dinners.  I found making it on a cookie sheet worked perfectly.  This is also open to interpretation--don't like rosemary?  Use thyme instead.  Don't want to use chicken thighs?  Go with breasts.  Lots of room for improvisation depending on what your family likes and what's in your pantry and refrigerator.

Ingredients

Chicken pieces--about four pieces but you can increase as needed
1 onion cut into wedges
4 red potatoes quartered or cut in eighths if large
1 lemon sliced
1 - 2 tsps. minced garlic (depending on how much you like garlic)
4 sprigs fresh rosemary (or less if they are huge--mine were like tree branches!)
1/4 cup olive oil
Salt & Pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 450 degrees

Combine onion, lemon, garlic, rosemary and olive oil in a bowl.  Add chicken and potatoes wedges and toss well to coat.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

Spread out on cookie sheet and cook until potatoes are done and chicken reaches 165 degrees.

Slice lemons


Quarter onion



Spread on cookie sheet


Bake at 450 degrees


 


The county fair is the highlight of the year for the small town of Lovett, Michigan—especially for food-and-lifestyle blogger Shelby McDonald, who writes as the Farmer’s Daughter. She’s submitting jams and jellies she’s created from the produce she grows at Love Blossom Farm in hopes of harvesting a blue ribbon.

But the townspeople get more than just the excitement of hayrides, tractor pulls, and cotton candy when Shelby’s neighbor and volunteer fireman, Jake Taylor, extricates the body of Zeke Barnstable instead of a dummy during a demonstration of the Jaws of Life. The fact that Jake and Zeke were known to be at odds plants suspicion in the minds of the police. As evidence against Jake grows, Shelby knows she has to plow through the clues to weed out the true killer and save her friend.

Follow me on Facebook to learn about upcoming giveaways! 

 




 

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Roasted Baby Tomatoes with Grilled Chicken and Tarragon #recipe @LeslieBudewitz


LESLIE BUDEWITZ:  A few weeks ago, I shared a favorite recipe, Julia Child’s Tarragon Chicken, known in our house as “Chicken Julia.”

This dish uses some of the same flavors. (I found the original in Good Housekeeping, but surprise, surprise! I changed it!) Instead of making a sauce in a pan, the roasted tomatoes and their juices create the sauce. The first time we made this, Mr. Right’s last patient ran late – his acupuncture clinic is in our home – and the tomatoes were done before we threw the chicken on the grill. They were still warm and wonderful, but I realized that better timing would make for a better flavor, and our second try proved the theory. The tomatoes lose their juice as they cool, but when hot, the juices seep into the chicken and gives it an extra punch.

So don’t be like us. Timing matters.

We were super-proud of ourselves for growing the tomatoes, garlic, and tarragon. Not the chicken, though—too many hungry foxes and grizzlies in our neighborhood. A mix of sizes and colors makes the tomatoes extra yummy. We served this with a green salad and grilled naan -- mmm!

And yes, I did kill someone once with a meat mallet. On the page, but still. Be careful.

Roasted Baby Tomatoes with Grilled Chicken and Tarragon

1 pound grape or cherry tomatoes, mixed
2 large cloves of garlic, crushed or minced
3 tablespoons olive oil (divided use)
1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
kosher salt
fresh ground black pepper
3/4 to 1 pound chicken breasts
1 tablespoon fresh tarragon, chopped

Heat oven to 500 degrees and pre-heat your grill to medium.

Cut about one cup of the tomatoes in half. Mix in a bowl or on your baking sheet with the garlic, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, pepper flakes, and ½ to 1 teaspoon salt. Roast on the middle rack, stirring once or twice, about 18-20 minutes, or until tomatoes begin to burst and soften. (You might even hear them!) Some charring is great. If your tomatoes aren’t very juicy, you can add a tablespoon or two of water, but be careful—it will instantly steam up, so keep your hands and face out of the way.




Meanwhile, lay the chicken breasts in plastic wrap, fold, and pound to about ½" thick. Brush with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill until lightly marked and cooked through, 3-4 minutes a side.



Place grilled chicken on serving plate. Toss the tomato mixture and its juices with the tarragon, and spoon on top of the chicken.


Serves 2-4.

Bon appetit!


From the cover of TREBLE AT THE JAM FEST, Food Lovers' Village Mystery #4 (Midnight Ink, June 2017):  

Erin Murphy, manager of Murphy’s Mercantile (aka the Merc), is tuning up for Jewel Bay’s annual Jazz Festival. Between keeping the Merc’s shelves stocked with Montana’s tastiest local fare and hosting the festival’s kick-off concert, Erin has her hands full.

Discord erupts when jazz guitarist Gerry Martin is found dead on the rocks above the Jewel River. The one-time international sensation had fallen out of sync with festival organizers, students, and performers. Was his death an accident?or did someone even the score?

Despite the warning signs to not get involved, Erin investigates. And when the killer attacks, she orchestrates her efforts into one last crescendo, hoping to avoid a deadly finale.



Leslie Budewitz is the author of the Food Lovers’ Village Mysteries and the Spice Shop Mysteries—and the first author to win Agatha Awards for both fiction and nonfiction. The past president of Sisters in Crime, she lives in northwest Montana with her husband, a musician and doctor of natural medicine, and their cat, an avid bird-watcher.

Swing by my website and join the mailing list for my seasonal newsletter. And join me on Facebook where I announce lots of giveaways from my cozy writer friends.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Chicken with Balsamic Glaze

I love recipes that are quick, easy and yet have that little something "extra" to them.  I thought this recipe fit the bill so I decided to try it.  I made a few changes to it so I'll give you the original recipe plus the options I came up with!  It was a big hit with both me and hubby, and I'll definitely make it again.

1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
2 large boneless, chicken breasts cut in half horizontally (I used four boneless chicken thighs instead)
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
salt & pepper to taste
1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, cut in half (I used half a pint and it was plenty in my opinion)
2 minced cloves garlic
1 medium onion, chopped
basil leaves, sliced

First make the balsamic glaze.  Put the vinegar in a small pan over medium high heat.  Reduce until the consistency of a syrup. (I over reduced and got an almost jam like consistency. Easily fixed by adding a bit of water and reheating it.)

Season the chicken with salt and freshly ground pepper.

Heat the oil until very hot.  Add the chicken and let brown for about one minute. Turn the breasts and brown the other side.  Reduce heat to low, cover the pan and cook for approximately ten minutes or until chicken is cooked through.  Remove chicken to a serving dish and keep warm.

Turn the heat back up to high and reduce liquid in pan until it is syrupy.  Reduce heat to medium and add the onions.  Saute until the onions are soft.  Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds then add the tomatoes. Cook for two minutes (I wanted my tomatoes cooked more so I cooked them longer than that.) 

There were so many lovely browned bits in the pan that I decided to deglaze it with a tablespoon or two of water at this point but that's optional.

Spoon onion/tomato mixture over chicken and drizzle balsamic glaze on top. Sprinkle with basil.


This was a little too thick--I had to add water

Chopped veggies ready to go

Brown chicken

Saute veggies

Enjoy!


Listen to my Podcast!


I just recorded a fun podcast with the lovely Jenny Wheeler of Binge Reading about reading and writing cozies!  You'll love her delightful New Zealand accent!

https://thejoysofbingereading.com/peg-cochran-cozy-mystery-queen/ 



The county fair is the highlight of the year for the small town of Lovett, Michigan—especially for food-and-lifestyle blogger Shelby McDonald, who writes as the Farmer’s Daughter. She’s submitting jams and jellies she’s created from the produce she grows at Love Blossom Farm in hopes of harvesting a blue ribbon.

But the townspeople get more than just the excitement of hayrides, tractor pulls, and cotton candy when Shelby’s neighbor and volunteer fireman, Jake Taylor, extricates the body of Zeke Barnstable instead of a dummy during a demonstration of the Jaws of Life. The fact that Jake and Zeke were known to be at odds plants suspicion in the minds of the police. As evidence against Jake grows, Shelby knows she has to plow through the clues to weed out the true killer and save her friend.

Follow me on Facebook to learn about upcoming giveaways! 

 


Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Stuffed Potato, Zucchini, Chicken and Cheese #recipe from author @DarylWoodGerber




I don't know about you, but every once in a while, I have to empty my refrigerator. That means going through things and deciding what absolutely must be eaten. I found a carton of sour cream that was begging to be used. And chicken (already cooked) that cried out, "Eat me!"  (I have to admit I was feeling a bit like Alice in Wonderland. I also found an onion and a zucchini that were going to grow tired if I didn't do something with them.  I like to accommodate my vegetables, don't you? And honestly I hate tired zucchini.  The peel loses that lovely crunch factor. And a tired onion simply grows limp and loses flavor. Ugh. 

What to do?

Well, I hadn't eaten a potato in I can't tell you how long. I love potatoes, but they don't particularly like my waistline. However, I figured if I made this as a lunch—I like to eat all my starchy...glycemic... (non-green) carbs before dinner time and stick to protein and green veggies for dinner—I could rationalize eating the potato.

Talk about easy and quick! I baked the potato in the microwave. I found a nifty trick while refiguring Sparky's diet lately. You wrap the potato (or in Sparky's case a sweet potato) in saran. Cut two holes into the potato and microwave for 5-6 minutes. When done, the skin peels right off.  I didn't want the skin to peel off my baked potato, but it could have, if desired.

By the way, this means that I now have plenty of space in my refrigerator for all the goodies I want to share with you as we draw near to the release of A DEADLY ÉCLAIR in November. On my list of recipes not found in the book:  French Pear Tart, French Roquefort Tart, Gogeres (a cheese puff appetizer - yum), Spinach soufflé and more!  Get ready. Ooh, la, la!

Stuffed Potato, Zucchini, Chicken and Cheese

1 Russett potato
1 tablespoon butter
¼ cup chopped onion
¼ cup chopped zucchini
¼ cup cooked chicken ( I used half a chicken a thigh)
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon pepper
½ teaspoon mixed herbs (I used Penzey’s Parisienne)
2-4 tablespoons shredded Gouda cheese (or Cheddar cheese)
1-2 tablespoons sour cream
A dash of paprika

Wrap potato in plastic wrap. Cut a large slice into the potato through the plastic wrap. Cook in microwave for 5-6 minutes until tender. Remove plastic wrap and cut the potato in half. Scoop out the potato meat. Set aside ¼ cup, diced. (You can save or toss the rest.)

In a sauté pan over medium-high heat, melt the butter. Add the onion.  Stir for one minute. Add the zucchini. Stir for another minute. Add the chicken.  Season with salt, pepper, and herbs.  Add the reserved ¼ cup cooked potato. Stir fry for 1 minute longer.

Set the scooped out potato skin on a plate. Top with the stir-fried potato and veggies mixture. Add cheese and sour cream. Sprinkle with paprika and serve immediately.












Savor the mystery!

*
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A DEADLY ÉCLAIR, the 1st in the French Bistro Mysteries, is coming November 2017. Can Mimi clear her name before the killer turns up the heat? Click here to order.










GRILLING THE SUBJECT, the 5th Cookbook Nook Mystery, is out!
The Wild West Extravaganza has come to Crystal Cove.
Click here to order.









FOR CHEDDAR OR WORSE, the 7th Cheese Shop Mystery is out!
Finally there's going to be a cheese festival in Providence!
Click to order.










GIRL ON THE RUN
                                a stand-alone suspense
When a fairytale fantasy night becomes a nightmare, 
Chessa Paxton must run for her life...but will the truth set her free? 
Click to order




DAY OF SECRETS

my new stand-alone suspense
A mother he thought was dead. A father he never knew. 
An enemy that wants them dead.
Click here to order.



Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Chicken Julia - #recipe @LeslieBudewitz

LESLIE BUDEWITZ: A few years ago, Mr. Right and I spent a month in my France for my mumbledy-mumbledy birthday. For me, it was a dream come true. For him, it started out as something he agreed to because it was my dream—and ended up as possibly his favorite trip ever, for a man who’s traveled much of the world.

It was the people (seriously!), the art, the history, the landscape, and the food. The food, the food, the food. When we returned home, we set about transforming ourselves from decent home cooks to good ones. That Christmas, he bought me an armful of Julia Child cookbooks and videos, while I bought him a raft of kitchen accessories.

One of our go-to recipes we simply call “Chicken Julia,” based on a recipe in Julia’s Kitchen Wisdom: Essential Techniques and Recipes from a Lifetime of Cooking. The sauce is incredibly simple, and so rich and flavorful--the perfect illustration of the importance of a simple technique like deglazing the pan and using the juices as the base for the sauce.

I'm honestly not sure I'd ever used fresh tarragon before we first made this recipe; now, I keep a pot growing on the back porch during good weather and do my best to nurture it inside through the Montana winter. In fact, I've kept the current pot going over two seasons--last fall, it had gotten quite leggy so I cut it back and dried the leaves, then forgot it in the laundry room. A couple of weeks later, I discovered that it had sent up new green shoots. Looks like it will keep going this year, too, making my 99 cent annual quite the bargain. (That's it in the terra cotta pot.)

Even if you can't grow your own tarragon, do try to find some fresh stuff at least once when you make this recipe. I can pretty much guarantee it will become a staple in your house, too!

Chicken Julia

2 boneless chicken breasts
salt and pepper
1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
½ cup dry white wine or French vermouth
1 tablespoon minced shallot
1/4 cup chicken stock
1 tablespoon fresh or 1 teaspoon dried tarragon

Place the chicken breasts in plastic wrap and flatten with a mallet or the flat of a large chef’s knife to about ½ inch thick. Season with salt and pepper. Melt butter in a large saute pan, add the oil, and heat. Saute the chicken breasts, about one minute a side, until thy are springy to the touch; be sure they are done but not overcooked—Julia says the juices should run clear or yellow with no pink. Remove the chicken; the sauce won’t take long to cook, but keeping them in a warm oven is a nice touch.



Deglaze the pan with the wine or vermouth. Add the shallots, stock, and vermouth, and cook two to three minutes, stirring, to make a sauce. Plate the chicken and divide the sauce, pouring it over the chicken.


Serves two. Bon appetit!  

From the cover of TREBLE AT THE JAM FEST, Food Lovers' Village Mystery #4 (Midnight Ink, June 8, 2017):  

Erin Murphy, manager of Murphy’s Mercantile (aka the Merc), is tuning up for Jewel Bay’s annual Jazz Festival. Between keeping the Merc’s shelves stocked with Montana’s tastiest local fare and hosting the festival’s kick-off concert, Erin has her hands full.

Discord erupts when jazz guitarist Gerry Martin is found dead on the rocks above the Jewel River. The one-time international sensation had fallen out of sync with festival organizers, students, and performers. Was his death an accident?or did someone even the score?

Despite the warning signs to not get involved, Erin investigates. And when the killer attacks, she orchestrates her efforts into one last crescendo, hoping to avoid a deadly finale.


Leslie Budewitz is the author of the Food Lovers’ Village Mysteries and the Spice Shop Mysteries—and the first author to win Agatha Awards for both fiction and nonfiction. The past president of Sisters in Crime, she lives in northwest Montana with her husband, a musician and doctor of natural medicine, and their cat, an avid bird-watcher.

Swing by my website and join the mailing list for my seasonal newsletter. And join me on Facebook where I announce lots of giveaways from my cozy writer friends.

Friday, August 11, 2017

An Irish Pasty?

Okay, I'm almost out of new Irish recipes (from this trip), but this one sneaked up on me.

I will happily cede the title of Pasty Queen to Rhys for her Cornish version. I'm not sure I've ever seen an official pasty in Ireland, and the ones shown online seem to lean toward beef stew in a crust. 

But I was having a nice lunch at The Coffee Shop in Union Hall (I love their house-baked pastries! see their Facebook page), and I ordered what was described on the menu as a chicken and Camembert panini with pesto. It arrived, and I was so intent on eating it that I didn't notice that it didn't quite fit the definition of a panini, which usually calls for something between two pieces of bread, pressed to cook, leaving a nice grilling pattern. 

What I got was delicious, but I actually observed it being made: no press involved. However, it did have a wonderful short crust, which I envied. And the filling was flavorful and interesting, so I decided to recreate it (as best I could). Call it whatever you like--it tastes good.

An Irish Pastypannini a la The Coffee Shop

Ingredients

(note: this recipe serves two, but you can expand it or make a second batch later--I had plenty of chicken and cheese left over))

1 recipe pie crust (I shamelessly borrowed Lucy Burdette's version of the Moosewood crust, which actually held together!) It is the simplest version I have ever seen.




Filling:




one chicken breast, skinned and deboned, lightly cooked 



a small amount of pesto, to rub into the chicken

a small Camembert cheese

1 egg, beaten (this is the glue that holds things together)

Instructions:

Make the pesto, to your taste. I used fresh basil, pine nuts, olive oil, salt and pepper (no garlic, but add it if you like). Mash them together and massage the chicken with it and let it sit for a while to absorb the flavor.

Saute the chicken lightly in a bit more olive oil. Don't worry if it's not cooked through, because this is going into the oven once the thing is assembled. Let cool, then slice about 1/4-inch thick.




Slice the Camembert to about the same thickness.




Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F and grease a baking sheet.

Make your pie dough (I used a food processor). Combine the flour, butter and salt and process until it looks like sand. Then add ice water, one tablespoon at a time, until it holds together. Turn it out on a wooden board and form two balls.




I considered adding something like mayonnaise to the inside, but the contents are fairly delicate in flavor, so I decided against it. The crust is very buttery, so the results won't be dry.




Roll out the first ball of dough into a rough circle. Lay three or four pieces of the cooked chicken on one half, then the same number of slices of cheese on top. Don't overfill, or it will never hold together!

Beat the egg lightly, and brush some around the edge of the crust. Fold carefully and crimp the edges together--you want to seal this. Repeat with the second one. Brush the tops of both lightly with some more egg.




Place on the prepared cookie sheet and slide into the middle of the preheated oven. Set the timer for ten minutes, then check to see that the crust has begun to brown. Then reduce the heat to 350 degrees and continue cooking for another 10-15 minutes. The chicken should be nicely cooked, and the cheese with be gooey. (And they didn't leak!)




Slice in half to serve. These can be served warm or at room temperature.




You can vary your ingredients however you like, but this is a nice combination. If you have some leftover chicken, you're home free. You can swap in a packaged pie crust if you want (easier still!), but I've never seen a simpler pie crust recipe, and I've tried at least a dozen.



Many a Twist, the next County Cork Mystery, coming next January. Maura actually gets to eat in a variety of restaurants. I'll make a foodie out of her yet!
www.sheilaconnolly.com



The real Coffee Shop in Union Hall