Sunday, May 15, 2016

Welcome author @HannahDennison with book #giveaway!!


Please welcome our guest, Hannah Dennison.

Hannah is the author of The Vicky Hill Mysteries (Little, Brown) and the Honeychurch Hall Mysteries (Minotaur), both set in the wilds of the Devonshire countryside. Hannah originally moved to Los Angeles to pursue screenwriting. She has been an obituary reporter, antique dealer, private jet flight attendant and Hollywood story analyst. Now living in Portland, Oregon, Hannah still continues to teach mystery writing workshops at the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program in Los Angeles, California. Hannah has served on numerous judging committees for Mystery Writers of America and is serving on the MWA board for 2016-2018.

Although she spends most of her time in Oregon with her husband and two insane Vizsla dogs, Hannah’s heart remains in England. She is a passionate supporter of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, the Historic Houses Association, and the National Trust. She enjoys all country pursuits, movies, theater and seriously good chocolate.

Don't miss Hannah's book(s) giveaway below!!

Take it away, Hannah!

How to make a traditional English Cottage Pie!

When I was a child in the early sixties, my mother’s variation on our weekly menu rarely changed. On Sunday we had a roast (beef, lamb or pork); Monday was either Cottage or Shepherd’s Pie (depending on what joint**was leftover on Sunday); Tuesday was bangers and mash; Wednesday was a stew of some kind; Thursday was the dreaded fried liver and onions; Friday was fish and chips and Saturday was soup and cold cuts or eggs.
**Joint is British slang for a particular cut of meat—usually “topside”—and not to be confused with cigarettes of the recreational kind.

At that time, pasta was only just making an appearance in England but my father was leery of “foreign goop” as he called it, so pasta did not feature in our household until I was a teenager.

As the Dennison’s weekly menu illustrates, it was not particularly varied and definitely the kind of culinary fare that gave British cooking the bad reputation that it wholly deserved back in the last century.

But I really did enjoy eating Monday’s Cottage Pie. As you can probably gather, it was a popular way of eking out a Sunday roast by using the leftover meat and the gravy.
It honestly makes a huge difference if you can make this dish from scratch— which is what I did especially for Mystery Lovers’ Kitchen (fanfare of trumpets please!). And yes, I agree, who has time to do that these days!

If you are making it from scratch you’ll need some kind of meat-grinding contraption. Pictured is the one my mother gave me­ decades ago. See how shiny it is? I am embarrassed to admit that up until now, I’ve only used it three times.

A quick note: This is not a Bolognese sauce with mash on top so be brave. Don’t use tinned tomatoes. Ever. But by all means add lashings of tomato ketchup as a condiment on the side.

So here we go:

Cottage Pie (Serves 4) 
Oven temperature: 375F

Ingredients
2lbs Russet potatoes or any that mash well
4oz butter
1 medium onion, chopped
2 sticks celery, chopped
1tsp of dried thyme
½ glass of red wine (optional)
1 ½lbs of cooked beef tenderloin (if making from scratch) OR 1 ½lbs ground beef
1½ cups of beef stock/gravy
1tsp of cornstarch (optional—I don’t put this in if I’m using the gravy from the roast)
2tsp of Worcestershire sauce
Sour cream (optional)
Salt & Pepper

Method from scratch:
Grind up the leftover beef.
Heat the oil in a large skillet. Add the freshly ground beef, chopped onion, celery and crushed garlic. Cook until slightly brown.




Method using ground beef:
Gently fry the ground beef in it’s own fat in a large skillet until brown.

Remove meat with a slotted spoon and set aside. If there are more than a couple of tablespoons of fat left, drain off the rest and discard.

In the remaining fat, gently fry the chopped onion, celery and crushed garlic until soft. I don’t add oil when frying ground beef because the end result can be very fatty.

Both methods:
You’ve now got your browned beef, onion, celery, and crushed garlic in the skillet.

Pour in one cup of leftover gravy, half a glass of red wine (optional), 2tsp Worcestershire sauce and dried thyme, salt and pepper.

Simmer for ½ an hour, adding a touch of water if you think it’s too dry but don’t make it too runny or the mashed potato will sink. If you think it’s too watery, add a touch of cornstarch.

Meanwhile, peel and cut the potatoes into chunks. Boil them until you can stick them through with a knife. Drain the water and mash them up with butter and sour cream until they are fluffy.


Put the meat sauce in a deep pie dish. I use a soufflé dish.

Pop the mashed potato on top of the sauce. Dab it with butter and run a fork across to help the potato crisp up.


Stick in the oven for 40 minutes until brown and crisp on top and you can just see the sauce beneath sizzling.

Serve with English garden peas or green beans

A final note, Cottage Pie freezes well.

ENJOY!


And now for that giveaway! I am giving away 1 hardback copy of KILLER BALL AT HONEYCHURCH HALL plus 1 paperback copy of MURDER AT HONEYCHURCH HALL to 2 winners. Leave a comment telling me whether you've ever eaten anything British in nature and remember to leave your email (cryptic or else-wise) so I can contact you if you win.  Cheers!

Connect with Hannah:
Twitter: @HannahDennison


A Killer Ball at Honeychurch Hall, May 3, 2016

When antique dealer Kat Stanford discovers the partially mummified body of a young woman in an abandoned
wing at Honeychurch Hall, suspicion falls on those who had been living there half a century ago. In those days the Bushman Traveling Fair and Boxing Emporium camped on the estate grounds, so Kat is not surprised to learn that her mother Iris knew the victim.
Meanwhile, the unexpected appearance of retired sailor and local lothario Bryan Laney sets female hearts aflutter. Despite the passing years, time has not dampened his ardor for Iris but the feeling is not reciprocated. With stories of hidden treasure and secret chambers, misguided loyalties and spiteful deception, past and present collide. As Kat becomes embroiled once more in her mother’s tumultuous bygone days, she comes to realize that life is never black and white, and that sometimes, lies become necessary to protect the ones you love.





143 comments:

  1. Lived in London for a while, and have an English son-in-law, so I've eaten lots of English food. Mark specializes in curries, but I love to make cottage pie and sticky toffee pudding.

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    1. I love sticky toffee pudding but I have never made it myself!

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  2. As an ex-pat living with my American wife & son and being the chief cook & bottle washer I feed them British food as much as possible ingredients willing. Most weeks I make a korma curry, a shepards or cottage pie & a jam roly poly. I've not managed to find a proper haggis yet or even persuade them that they'd like to try it but I live in hope. russell at russelldavis.org

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    1. Ha! You are a braver soul than I. I'm not sure I'd try haggis ... my husband (American) tasted black pudding once and never got over what it really was!

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    2. I love Black Pudding. You can't make a proper full english without it.

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  3. Excellent Cottage Pie recipe! Can't beat homemade. I have had cottage pie before in the past - great hearty dish. EMS591@aol.com

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  4. I have had cottage pie and fish and chips. Of course liver and onions, but not once a week. Thanks for sharing your recipe and for the chance to win one of your books!
    angelhwk68@yahoo.com

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    1. I always think that fish and chips is best eaten out of newspaper the old-fashioned way. Funny to think we'd even consider that these days!

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  5. Cottage Pie looks so yummy! Thank you for the recipe.
    myrifraf (at) gmail (dot) com

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  6. I was lucky enough to spend a couple of months working in England years ago. I had the traditional breakfast many times in my hotel (not sure about that fried bread) and our team went to local pubs each day for lunch and nearby restaurants for dinner. Ploughman's lunch, Shepherd's Pie, quail, lemon curd - lots of good stuff, with special trips to Betty's in Yorkshire.
    Love the Honeychurch Hall series; thanks for the giveaway.
    sallycootie@gmail.com

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    1. I'm happy you are enjoying Honeychurch Hall. My mum makes a great lemon curd.

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  7. Thanks for sharing. I'm a big fan of cottage pie - it is a great way to use leftovers. We have fish & chips and liver & onions (I even have family members who hate liver & onions eat mine) and bangers & mash at least a several times a year. I also like to have a traditional English tea and breakfast but now that the kids are gone it's not as much fun to cook all that for just my husband.

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    1. Have you ever tried "bubble-and-squeak?" That's another way to use up yesterday's vegetables - adding brussel sprouts to the mix makes it extra tasty.

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    2. I've Americanized my Bubble-and-squeak as it's normally made after the St. Patty's Day corned beef & cabbage so it ends up being smushed cabbage, potatoes & carrots with whatever remains of the corned beef to make a corned beef hash bubble-and-squeak

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  8. Thanks for sharing. I'm a big fan of cottage pie - it is a great way to use leftovers. We have fish & chips and liver & onions (I even have family members who hate liver & onions eat mine) and bangers & mash at least a several times a year. I also like to have a traditional English tea and breakfast but now that the kids are gone it's not as much fun to cook all that for just my husband.

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  9. Cottage pie is yummy. Also remember eating Cornish pasties, scones with clotted cream and jam while in England. grace dot koshida at gmail dot com

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    1. LOVE Cornish pasties - although I always think they'd make an excellent murder weapon if the pastry case is particularly hard.

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  10. Love scones and shepard's pie! Thanks for the recipe! Dspinlexo@aol.com

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    1. I like cheese scones and fruit scones as well. Thanks for leaving a comment

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  11. Loved the first Honeychurch book and looking forward to the new one. At home we eat a lot of shepherd's pie (with ground lamb), but your tip for using a fork on the potatoes sounds like a good one. The most unexpected meal in England was when we stopped somewhere in Wales (does that still count as England?) and Boxty was on the menu. We thought it was delicious, and only later did we learn it included liver dumplings (had we but known, we never would have ordered it). (You don't need to enter me in the drawing!)

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    1. OMG Sheila! I have never heard of liver dumplings! I'm not sure I could even try one without gagging....

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  12. I make cottage pie once in a while. We like it but it's a lot for three people. I've been to England and some of my favorites there were steak and ale, fish and chips, bangers and mash, and Cornish pasties.

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    1. I have reheated cottage pie the following day - as long as you cover the dish in aluminum foil so it doesn't dry out it tastes okay!

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  13. I love cottage pie or shepherds pie. And I love visiting a British shop we have in Toronto that has all kinds of treats! Thanks for the chance!
    karen(dot)kenyon(at)rogers(dot)com

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    1. If my mum doesn't send me care parcels full of British goodies, I order from an online British Food Depot. http://britishfooddepot.com

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  14. Thank you for the recipe...I shall have to give that a go.

    I have enjoyed upon occassion eaten British cuisine...and have always loved it. While in England I had Yorkshire pudding, shepherd's pie, fish and chips, bangers and mash....and good ole ale to go alongwith the meal :). mommy_to_zoe @ hotmail.com

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    1. I love Yorkshire pudding. If you put bangers into the batter and then stick it into the oven it becomes "Toad-in-the-Hole."

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    2. we'd sometimes put in lamb chops instead of sausages and it was then called "sheep in the fold" inmy neck of the woods (Leicestershire & Essex)

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  15. When I was in England, I made sure to try cottage pie, and it was delicious. Mine has never turned out that well, so I'm looking forward to trying your recipe. I really enjoy the Honeychurch books! Looking forward to the new one. frybbe (@) gmail.com

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    1. So glad you enjoy Honeychurch. I hope you give my recipe a try. Thanks for stopping by today.

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  16. We've attempted making Cottage pie once or twice and it never seemed to come out right. We always ended up with something that ended up as mashed potatoes with mashed hamburger under it.

    NoraAdrienne (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. Ha ha! My mashed potato used to sink into the meat beneath and get all stodgy. That's when I realized that sometimes, letting the meat mixture cool a little helps because it solidifies a little.

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  17. I really enjoy scones. My family likes the peanut butter ones that I make. Thank you for the giveaway!
    mittens0831 at aol dot com

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    1. I must have that recipe! I love peanut butter so I know I would love those scones!

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  18. I like cottage pie , but bubble and squeak is my favorite dish ! Thank you for a chance to win one of your books , they are wonderfully written . kathambre@yahoo.com

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    1. I love super-crispy bubble and squeak. I haven't made it though (I really should). I'm glad you enjoy the Honeychurch books.

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  19. I've never eaten anything British---but I'm sure going to try that recipe for cottage pie--I think my hubby will even like it.
    suefarrell.farrell@gmail.com

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    1. As your first venture into British cooking - it's a safe bet. My husband is American and he loves it!

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  20. While I have never been overseas ... I have be fortunate enough to live close to a British bakery where I've sampled many delicious treats (sweet and savory) as well as attending some great festivals that have served British fare!
    I love cottage pie, although I grew up calling it shepherds pie!

    I love your recipe and hope to try yours out =)
    celticmajic @ hotmail . com

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    1. Ah yes - shepherds vs. cottage pie. I honestly only realized the difference myself when I dug out an old cookery book by Mrs. Beeton. In that one she calls lamb "mutton" which is basically a very old sheep.

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  21. I'm eager to try your recipe, Hannah. My mother always served fish on Fridays, too, which I found amusing because we weren't Catholic. Maybe it was just a universal thing for women their age.

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    1. I think you're right about that! We're not Catholic either but it was definitely a Friday thing. Unfortunately, we never experimented with fish or ways to cook it. It was usually just boiled and served plain!

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  22. I make (and eat) scones, lemon curd, and cottage pie. I've eaten bubble-n-squeak, and spotted dick when I've been in London, as well as a "farmer's lunch" at local pubs. pjcoldren@tm.net

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    1. What about jam ropy poly? We ate that at school and it was always a disappointment. I've not made spotted dick though.

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  23. I have eaten cottage/Shepherd's pie. I also love scones and eat them quite frequently. Your books sound very interesting. This would be a nice giveaway to win.
    marlene.ezell@gmail.com

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    1. I really wish I could buy Devonshire clotted cream in the USA - the real stuff - not the one in the jar. For me, that's the best way to eat scones (with jam of course).

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  24. Thank you for the giveaway! I've never eaten anything British but I think my dad will like your recipe for Cottage Pie. Your books sound great!! smmolloy1105@yahoo.com

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    1. Thanks Shannon! I hope you give it a try and that your Dad will like it.

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  25. I have never tried anything British..thanks so much for the chance!

    rockergoddess2002@yahoo.com

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    1. ... there is always a first time :) Thanks for stopping by today!

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  26. I make Cottage Pie quite a bit when our kids come to visit. They pretty much grew up on it since it was economical and at the time budget was tight. Now when they visit they ask for it as their special :mommy make it" meal. I also love scones with my morning coffee so have to make them to get them the way I like. I also love collecting authographed copies of cozy author books for my special book shelf! Merry email: northstarvance@gmail.com

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    1. Excellent! I love hear about the "mommy make it" meal. I also love the sound of your special bookshelf. There are so many amazing cozy writers out there - I have a special bookshelf too.

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  27. I've vacationed in London and loved an English breakfast, as well as yummy fish and chips! Thanks for the giveaway!
    Kim Burch email: bispi821@yahoo.com

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    1. Somehow eating an English breakfast that's cooked by someone else is much tastier than when I cook it myself. I really like the fried bread (which is so bad for you, I know!)

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  28. I've eaten and loved Cottage Pie and Fish and Chips. Thank you for the Cottage Pie recipe and this chance.
    peggyhyndman(at)att(dot)net

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    1. I admit I cheat with the chips though. I use oven-ready - is that bad? My mum makes them from scratch.

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  29. Never had Cottage Pie but it sounds really good. Have added this book to my TBR list and can't wait to read it. brichardson0056@yahoo.com

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    1. I love hearing that! Thank you! I hope you try the pie....

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  30. That sounds quite good. I sent the first 10 years of my life in Canada & we have relatives in England. I've been offered cow's tongue as my mother grew up with it. I politely declined. We do have Yorkshire Pudding with our roast & our family is definitely yea drinkers. Hot, of course. Ahmad is my favorite & I many different varieties in my "tea cupboard". Your books all sound very good. They've been on my Goodreads list a while.
    bpwoodfield@gmail.com

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    1. I don't think I could eat cow's tongue either ... and I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be as polite as you were!

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  31. Is there a difference between cottage pie and shepherd's pie? I love British pub food, and found two great ones in Monterey, California. At both places they served British beers I've never found anywhere else. Their menu was loaded with what Americans like me think as British food..."Bloody" good roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, fish 'n chips, bubble 'n squeak, and (yuck!) steak and kidney pie. Even at EPCOT center there's a pub with marvelous British fare and countrymen. I loved the Welsh Rarebit on toast with a pint of Tennent's!!
    kat8762@aol.com

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    1. Cottage pie is beef, shepherds pie is lamb

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    2. I haven't eaten Welsh Rarebit for years. I now have a distinct hankering to make some! I must admit that bubble n' squeak is an acquired taste though.

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  32. I guess the only British-style food I've eaten is fish and chips. I love antiquing so your book sounds interesting to me.
    k_shurden@yahoo.com

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    1. I worked for this amazing antique dealer when I was in my twenties. He taught me so much. I love antiquing too!

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  33. We eat shepherd's pie occasionally and I used to make Yorkshire pudding. My son loves to eat scones.
    We had a grinder like that when I was growing up but my mom never used it for meat. She used it to grind up apples and cranberries for sauce for Thanksgiving dinner. I wonder where it is???
    lkish77123 at gmail dot com

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    1. What a great idea! I have never thought of using the grinder for apples and cranberries. I have considered using it as a murder weapon however (but just in a book!)

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  34. Sounds good! Thanks for the recipe. jmhinton@psci.net

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  35. Pat (patdupuy@yahoo.com)May 15, 2016 at 1:20 PM

    I enjoy your books so much, Hannah! We've visited Ireland and Scotland and had delicious food there. I particularly like cullen skink. Delicious. But can't take smoked salmon;we just do not agree. My husband tried haggis; I had a few bites of his and we were both pleasantly surprised. I spend a week in London years ago so had the famous English breakfast, lots of fish and chips, and good beer. We do have some pubs here in Houston that serve up British fare so we can indulge from time to time.

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    1. Pat - thank you. I so love hearing that. Believe it or not I have never tried haggis. Smoked salmon tastes good but tends to accompany me for the rest of the day! Next day I'm in Houston I will definitely hunt for some pubs!

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  36. Scones is the only thing I can think of that could be British. I've also had what they call the English Breakfast in Thailand. pgenest57@aol.com

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    1. Oh - I would be VERY curious to know about the Thai English breakfast!

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  37. Scones, crumpets, lemon curd, cottage pie, shepherds pie, steak and kidney pie, fish and chips, bubble and squeak, bangers and mash, and Eaton mess have all been enjoyable meals. Oh, and a giant English breakfast. Thanks for the chance to win. Dmskrug3(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. Eaton Mess! We served that as dessert at our wedding in Yorkshire. It's one of my favorite puddings.

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  38. I lived in London for a short time and adored the fish and chips we were able to get at the shop around the corner from our apartment.
    Lil
    little lamb lst at yahoo dot com

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    1. My nephew worked in a fish and chip shop one summer. All his clothes reeked of fish and chips when he came home but he didn't care. He got free food!

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  39. I love the idea of a dependable weekly menu. It certainly made things easier for your mum.
    I admit to being a bit of an Anglophile. My challenge with novels placed in the UK is that food references (She drank a lovely glass of claret, or They sat down to some tea and scones, fresh from the oven) sends me into the kitchen looking for something to eat or drink.
    libbydodd at comcast dot net

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    1. ha ha! I know! As I'm replying to all these lovely comments I am getting seriously hungry.

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  40. Welcome Hannah! I've made Shepard's Pie many times & have eaten fish & chips as well. Thank you for the Cottage Pie recipe. Thank you so much for a chance to win one of your books! sxygrndma48{at}yahoo{dot}com

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    1. And thank you for stopping by today. I think Fish and Chips is definitely the most popular dish on MLK today!

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  41. I love afternoon tea at Reynold's Tavern in Annapolis. Want to get to England to experience other foods first-hand. Thank u for the recipe! jsomers421@gmail.com

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    1. I have yet to visit Annapolis but when I do, I shall head for Reynold's Tavern. I hope you give the recipe a try!

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  42. The closest I've come to eating anything English would be Shepherd's pie in Toronto.. Thanks for the recipe and the chance to win. salvatoresmom71@yahoo.com

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    1. I like Shepherd's Pie as well as cottage pie - sometimes I can't honestly taste the difference :)

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  43. We love Fish and Chips and Shepherd's Pie. lkleback@hotmail.com

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  44. I think scones are the only experience I've had with English food, but the cottage pie sounds delicious. I'm loving your Honeychurch Hall series and looking forward to reading this latest!

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    1. Kathy! Thank you. I am so happy to hear that. I haven't made scones for ages but since there have been so many pro-scones foodies on this blog I think I should.

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  45. When I was in England I didn't try too much of their food. I did however fall in love with their chocolate. Matter of fact I think I will go grab a twirl or maybe a flake out of my hidden chocolate stash while the kids are out with their dad. utaker555@gmail.com

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    1. English chocolate is THE BEST. I really like flakes as well but usually manage to get most of it down my pants because ... it's so flakey!

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  46. Although my paternal relatives were from England, I've not been able to sample anything identified as English fare. My father's mother showed my mother how to make tomato gravy using bacon fat to serve in the morning over toast, but not sure that can be classified as English food. My bucket list has a journey to England to research my ancestry someday. Thanks for your wonderful books since they will help me feel like I'm there. robeader53@yahoo.com

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    1. Oh Robin - I'm glad you get a sense of England when you read the Honeyhurch mysteries. I miss living there very much so I feel like I visit there every day. BTW - I would love the recipe for tomato gravy. It sounds delicious!

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    2. Robin, by random generator, you are the winner of Hannah's paper back book! She'll be in contact via email. Congrats!!

      ~Daryl

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  47. I vacationed In England years ago. I didn't think it was too different. They ate more lamb and the bacon was not the same but otherwise I didn't eat snything very different. suefoster109@netzero.net

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    1. I confess I much prefer British bacon. It does taste different and the rashers are much bigger!

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  48. My mystery club used to have an annual English Tea. Some of the things we had included scones, Devonshire Cream, and Lemon Curd. In Home Ec, the teacher had us make the Shepherd's Pie. dbahn@iw.net

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    1. You had a better Home Ec. teacher than I did. Our first dish was some kind of fruit fool. Mine never set and ended up all over the backseat of my Mum's car. She wasn't very happy.

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  49. Recipe sounds really good. I've enjoyed fish & chips, liver & onions and cottage pie. Fish & chips could be every day as far as I am concerned. Love this series, so thanks for a chance to win. doward1952@yahoo.com

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    1. Fish and chips are very popular today. I like mine with malt vinegar, salt and ketchup. I'm getting really hungry right now ...

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  50. Spent a few days in England. best thing I had was Fish & Chips. everything else I tried was kind of bland.

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    1. Yes ... it can be bland. Perhaps that's why the Brits tend to use tons of ketchup!

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  51. Forgot my e-mail. kckendler {at]gmail [dot] com

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  52. I've eaten scones, but I think that is about the only thing British I've eaten. This is a new series to me and I can't wait to read.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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  53. I've eaten scones, but I think that is about the only thing British I've eaten. This is a new series to me and I can't wait to read.
    diannekc8(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. I love meeting new readers in cyberspace. I hope you get a chance to explore Honeychurch Hall! Thanks for stopping by.

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  54. I have had scones and fish and chips from a restaurant named Ye Olde English Shoppe. They were delicious but I am not sure if it was authentic. Thank you for the giveaway! crossxjo@hotmail.com

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    1. Ha! There are quite a few Olde English Shoppes around - but I hope the food was good regardless!

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  55. We have traveled to England, and I remember being very pleasantly surprised the first time at all the good food! We often make cottage pie, but your recipe sounds very good, I'll definitely try it! I would love to win your give-away:
    michele.vaneoos@gmail.com

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    1. The food has definitely improved. Probably because England is very much like the rest of the first world now and can get everything. When I was a child we only ate produce that was in season. It was so exciting when strawberries made their annual appearance!

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    2. Michele, by random generator, you are the winner of Hannah's hardback book! She'll be in contact via email. Congrats!!

      ~Daryl

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  56. Roast beef, popovers and pudding. Thanks for this lovely feature and giveaway. saubleb(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Hmm pudding. My mum used to steam jam puddings on top of the stove. We'd eat them with lashings of custard and thick double cream!

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  57. I love tea and scones. Many thanks. elliotbencan(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. I love PG Tips in the morning and Earl Grey in the afternoon :)

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  58. nothing authentic,but I have had fish n chips, and love scones of any flavor.. and tea,lol thanks for the chance rosep@bayland.net

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    1. Fish and chips and scones definitely seem to be a favorite today! Thanks for stopping by.

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  59. What a tasty-sounding recipe and what a GREAT giveaway! I was fortunate to spend 3 1/2 weeks (primarily) in London in January, 1973, taking a travel course "Nursing in Great Britain." I have so many wonderful memories from that experience! As far as food and beverage memories I recall trifle, fish and chips, and warm beer or lager. Thanks for the stroll down memory lane! I would LOVE to become acquainted with Honeychurch Hall!! bskts4unme@hotmail.com

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    1. Ah trifle! And did the trifle you tasted have lashings of sherry? I have to say ours did - and it made the evening much more lively!

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  60. Hi Hannah!
    Thanks for posting the recipe, it looks very yummy and comforting and I'll be sure to make it as soon as I have any leftover roast. Once upon a time I had a meat grinder attachment for my KitchenAid, but I donated it many, many moons ago to the Salvation Army because I never used it. Ever. I love fish and chips, Cadbury chocolate, and Twinings tea - and just about anything else British!
    Nicole
    p.s. As I have all three of your Honeychurch Hall books please don't put me in the running to win, I just wanted to chime in on the discussion! :-)
    p.p.s. If there is anyone reading this who hasn't read Hannah's books you must immediately go to your bookstore and pick one up - they're wonderful! :-)

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    1. Aw Nicole ... you are so sweet! Thank you. I am so glad you enjoy the Honeychurch series. I too am very partial to Cadbury's chocolate. I have a personal stash in a drawer that I eat in secret.

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  61. Thanks for the yummy recipe. I love shepherd's pie!

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  62. I too love sheperds pie - thanks for the recipe

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  63. We make a Fantabulous Vegan Shepherd's Pie! I also love Scones, Bubble & Squeak, Concannon and Tea :)
    Cheers-
    Kelly Braun
    Gaelicark@yahoo.com

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  64. We make a Fantabulous Vegan Shepherd's Pie! I also love Scones, Bubble & Squeak, Concannon and Tea :)
    Cheers-
    Kelly Braun
    Gaelicark@yahoo.com

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  65. I have been fortunate enough to travel to Britain several time. I love the food. Shepherd's Pie, Fish & Chips, Scones, and all the tea. I'm passing on the liver and onions. Haven't found a country in the world that makes liver palatable. Your pie recipe sounds amazing. Thanks for the chance to win a book.
    Kay
    ksarginson@tampabay.rr.com.

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  66. I've eaten scones, shepherd's pie, shortbread, tea, and jelly babies. elainehroberson@gmail.com

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  67. what a wonderful recipe. i love scones. I have had English shortbread and a few candies as well as a few snacks. when i worked for the airlines, some of the flight attendants brought us goodies back after we started flying into London. would love to win this book. kayt18(at)comcast(dot)net

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  68. Tea, and scones also liver and onions! Thanks for the chance to win your books!! It's so nice of you. Donamaekutska7@gmail.com

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  69. Scones count, right? I love scones!

    ElaineE246 at msn dot com

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  70. I love British cooking at least what I had in Devon. The Fish and chips when you are on the ocean and its fresh is wonderful. One thing I absolutely loved was Parsnips cooked the way they did it and I liked the Cornish pie,Shepherd's pie and the cream teas...scones and clotted cream to die for. Yum...I love the sound of the book...please enter me.
    Marilyn ewatvess@yahoo.com

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  71. I haven't, but I really want to! My dream trip is to take a summer and visit England and Ireland!

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  72. Fish & chips is the only English dish I have eaten would love to try more! Thanks for this giveaway!

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  73. I have had fish and chips as well as bangers and mash at a British Pub restaurant in Roanoke Virginia. I also have a niece-in-law from England. Her chef husband worked the year before they married in England. So when eating with them, we often get something British. I have grown up eating the American version of your Cottage pie. Only difference I saw was we put the garden peas in betwin the meat layer and the mashed potatoes. My children liked cheddar cheese melted on top.

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  74. I used to work for a husband and wife that were British they would cook while i cleaned or did typing for them. I lived in a foster home and i think my foster parents offered cheap labor as we would go to all these houses and clean or do things they didn't like to do and never a penny went to us. But i did smell alot of good food from the British couples house she was very stern. As an adult I have had fish and chips with the vinegar and that is great then the brats but not sure what they are called but they are good other than that I have not made anything for my husband. I know if there were recipes at the end of a book I would make them as he enjoys different things to eat. Oh yes and Shepherds pie i ate at a neighbors that was amazing that was not long ago. thank you for the wonderful offer of a print book as I am disabled and print is the best. ptclayton2@aol.com

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  75. had British food at The Rose and Crown in Disneyworld...Bangers and Mash, some crumpets and tea....very good! I still eat crumpets :P pjstaton64114@aol.com

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  76. NO I HAVE NOT EATEN ANY BRITISH FOOD THAT I KNOW OFF. THANKS FOR THE GIVEAWAY! SHELLEY S. calicolady60@hotmail.com

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  77. British food sounds like good eating! Good luck to everyone in this giveaway.

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  78. Oops, you might need this if I win! mjhopper at cox dot net

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